1746 to 1750 in sports

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Events of years in sports
Other years
1736 to 1740 | 1741 to 1745 | 1746 to 1750 | 1751 to 1755 | 1756 to 1760

Events in world sport through the years 1746 to 1750.

Boxing[edit]

Events

  • 1746 — Jack Slack defeated several opponents in provincial rings until 1747.[1]
  • 1746 or 1747 — Slack had a fight against Tom Aguer in a bout at New Buckingham, but the outcome is unknown.[1]
  • February 1747 — Jack Broughton introduced mufflers (early boxing gloves), based on the ancient cestus, for use in sparring contests only; matches remained bare-knuckle.[2]
  • 1748 — Jack Slack (who was known as the "Norfolk Butcher") sold his butcher shop to his brother and moved to London.[1]
  • 12 October 1748 — Slack defeated Ned Hunt in a 40 minute 8th round fight in London.[1]
  • 1749 — Slack opened a School of Boxing in Bristol.[1]
  • 1749 — Slack defeated John James in a 4 minute 1st round fight.[1]
  • 9 February 1749 — Slack defeated Sailor Field in a 1 hour 32 minute fight in London.[1]
  • 31 January 1750 — George Taylor defeated Jack Slack at London in 25 minute 17 round fight.[3]
  • 11 April 1747, 10 or 11 April 1750, or 10 May 1750, depending on source — Broughton challenged for his title by Jack Slack. After 14 minutes and in the fourth round, Broughton was blinded by swelling around his eyes and could not continue. Slack became the new English champion until 1760 even though George Taylor reclaimed the title after Slack refused to fight him but after he had already beaten Broughton.[4]

Chess[edit]

Events

Cricket[edit]

Events

  • 1745 to 1748 — single wicket cricket became increasingly popular and was the main form of cricket in England during this decade with lucrative contests taking place at the Artillery Ground in particular.[6]

Horse racing[edit]

Events

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Jack Slack". Cyber Boxing Zone. Retrieved 5 October 2017.
  2. ^ "Broughton's Rules (1743)". Cyber Boxing Zone. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  3. ^ "George Taylor". Cyber Boxing Zone. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  4. ^ "Jack Broughton". International Boxing Hall of Fame. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  5. ^ Murray, H. J. R. (1913). A History of Chess. Oxford University Press. p. 863. ISBN 0-19-827403-3.
  6. ^ Ashley-Cooper, At the Sign of the Wicket, 12 April 1900, pp. 36–52.

Sources[edit]