1800 United States gubernatorial elections

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1800 United States gubernatorial elections

← 1799 March 11, 1800 – December 7, 1800 1801 →

11 state governorships
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Federalist Democratic–Republican
Last election 10 governorships 6 governorships
Seats before 9 7[a]
Seats won 7 4
Seats after 9 7
Seat change Steady Steady
Seats up 7 4

USgubernatorial1800.png
     Democratic-Republican gain      Democratic-Republican hold
     Federalist gain      Federalist hold

United States gubernatorial elections were held in 1800, in 11 states, concurrent with the House, Senate elections and presidential election.

Six governors were elected by popular vote and five were elected by state legislatures.

Results[edit]

State Election Date Incumbent Party Status Opposing Candidates
Connecticut 10 April 1800[b] Jonathan Trumbull Jr. Federalist Re-elected, 5,544 (100.00%)
[1][2][3][4][5][6]
Kentucky 6-8 August 1800[c] James Garrard Democratic-Republican Re-elected, 8,390 (39.40%) Christopher Greenup (Democratic-Republican), 6,745 (31.67%)
Benjamin Logan (Democratic-Republican), 3,995 (18.76%)
Thomas Todd (Democratic-Republican), 2,166 (10.17%)
[7][8][9][4][10][11]
Maryland
(election by legislature)
10 November 1800 Benjamin Ogle Federalist Re-elected, unanimously
[12][13][14][15]
Massachusetts 7 April 1800 Moses Gill (acting)[d] Federalist Defeated, 2,019 (5.17%)[e][f] Caleb Strong (Federalist), 19,630 (50.26%)
Elbridge Gerry (Democratic-Republican), 17,019 (43.57%)[g]
Scattering 391 (1.00%)
[16][17][18][4][19][20][21]
New Hampshire 11 March 1800 John Taylor Gilman Federalist Re-elected, 10,362 (61.82%) Timothy Walker (Democratic-Republican), 6,039 (36.03%)
Scattering 361 (2.15%)
[22][23][24][4][25][26][27]
New Jersey
(election by legislature)
30 October 1800 Richard Howell Federalist Re-elected, unanimously
[28][29][30]
North Carolina
(election by legislature)
26 November 1800? Benjamin Williams Federalist
[31][32][33][h]
Re-elected, 127 votes[i] Joseph Taylor (Democratic-Republican), 26 votes[j]
John B. Ashe (Democratic-Republican) 17 votes
[38][39][40]
Rhode Island 2 April 1800[k] Arthur Fenner Democratic-Republican/Country Re-elected. Returns lost.
[41][42][43][4][44][45]
South Carolina
(election by legislature)
4 December 1800[46][47] or 5 December 1800[48] John Drayton (acting)[l] Democratic-Republican Re-elected, "majority of 18"
[49][50][51]
Vermont [ru] 2 September 1800 Isaac Tichenor Federalist Re-elected, 6,444 (63.41%) Israel Smith (Democratic-Republican), 3,339 (32.85%)[m]
Scattering 380 (3.74%)
[52][53][54][4][55][56][57][58][59]
Virginia
(election by legislature)
7 December 1800?[60][n] James Monroe Democratic-Republican Re-elected, "by a large majority"
[63][64][60]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "CT Governor, 1800". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 4 July 2020.
  2. ^ Glashan 1979, pp. 38-39.
  3. ^ Congressional Quarterly 1998, p. 44.
  4. ^ a b c d e f Dubin 2003.
  5. ^ Kallenbach and Kallenbach 1977, p. 86.
  6. ^ "Connecticut 1800 Governor". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved 7 July 2020.
  7. ^ "KY Governor, 1800". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 4 July 2020.
  8. ^ Glashan 1979, pp. 108-109.
  9. ^ Congressional Quarterly 1998, p. 53.
  10. ^ Kallenbach and Kallenbach 1977, p. 203.
  11. ^ "Kentucky 1800 Governor". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved 7 July 2020.
  12. ^ "MD Governor, 1800". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 4 July 2020.
  13. ^ Kallenbach and Kallenbach 1977, p. 250.
  14. ^ "Maryland 1800 Governor". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved 7 July 2020.
  15. ^ Votes and Proceedings of the Senate of the State of Maryland. November Session, 1800. Annapolis: Frederick Green, Printer to the State. p. 5.
  16. ^ "MA Governor, 1800". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 4 July 2020.
  17. ^ Glashan 1979, pp. 140-141.
  18. ^ Congressional Quarterly 1998, p. 57.
  19. ^ Kallenbach and Kallenbach 1977, p. 266.
  20. ^ "Massachusetts 1800 Governor". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved 7 July 2020.
  21. ^ Burdick, Charles (1814). The Massachusetts Manual: or Political and Historical Register, for the Political Year from June 1814 to June 1815. I. Boston: Charles Callender. p. 26.
  22. ^ "NH Governor, 1800". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 4 July 2020.
  23. ^ Glashan 1979, pp. 200-201.
  24. ^ Congressional Quarterly 1998, p. 66.
  25. ^ Kallenbach and Kallenbach 1977, p. 372.
  26. ^ "New Hampshire 1800 Governor". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved 7 July 2020.
  27. ^ Farmer, James. The New Hampshire Annual Register and United States Calendar, 1833. Concord: Marsh, Capen and Lyon. p. 17.
  28. ^ Kallenbach and Kallenbach 1977, p. 411.
  29. ^ "New Jersey 1800 Governor". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved 7 July 2020.
  30. ^ Lee, Francis Bazely (1902). New Jersey as a colony and a state. 3. New York: Publishing Society of New Jersey. p. 153.
  31. ^ Glashan 1979, pp. 228-229.
  32. ^ Broussard 1978, p. 220.
  33. ^ Gilpatrick, Delbert Harold (1931). Jeffersonian Democracy in North Carolina, 1789-1816. New York: Columbia University Press. p. 132.
  34. ^ Congressional Quarterly 1998, p. 27.
  35. ^ Kallenbach and Kallenbach 1977, p. 436.
  36. ^ "Gov. Benjamin Williams". nga.org. National Governors Association. Retrieved 7 July 2020.
  37. ^ Cheney, Jr., John L., ed. (1975). North Carolina Government 1585-1974: a narrative and statistical history. Raleigh, NC: North Carolina Department of the Secretary of State. p. 160.
  38. ^ "NC Governor, 1800". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 4 July 2020.
  39. ^ "North Carolina 1800 Governor". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved 7 July 2020.
  40. ^ Broussard 1978, p. 218.
  41. ^ "RI Governor, 1800". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 4 July 2020.
  42. ^ Glashan 1979, pp. 268-269.
  43. ^ Congressional Quarterly 1998, p. 76.
  44. ^ Kallenbach and Kallenbach 1977, p. 507.
  45. ^ J. Fred Parker, Secretary of State (1914). Manual, with Rules and Orders, for the use of the General Assembly of the State of Rhode Island, 1914. Providence, RI: E. L. Freeman Company, State Printers. p. 107.
  46. ^ Lewis, J. D. "John Drayton: 10th Governor of the State of South Carolina 1800 to 1802 and 1808 to 1810". carolana.com. Little River, S.C. Retrieved 7 July 2020.
  47. ^ "A record of this State's executives". Anderson Daily Intelligencer. Anderson, S.C. 26 May 1914. p. 20. Retrieved 7 July 2020.
  48. ^ Pinckney, Charles (6 December 1800). Letter to Thomas Jefferson. Columbia, S.C. https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-32-02-0189. Retrieved 7 July 2020. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  49. ^ "SC Governor, 1800". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 4 July 2020.
  50. ^ "South Carolina 1800 Governor". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved 7 July 2020.
  51. ^ "Charleston, December 8". Virginia Argus. Richmond, VA. 23 December 1800. p. 3. Retrieved 7 July 2020.
  52. ^ "VT Governor, 1800". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 4 July 2020.
  53. ^ Glashan 1979, pp. 314-315.
  54. ^ Congressional Quarterly 1998, p. 83.
  55. ^ Kallenbach and Kallenbach 1977, p. 606.
  56. ^ "Vermont 1800 Governor". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved 7 July 2020.
  57. ^ "General Election Results: Governor". Election Results Archive. Office of the Vermont Secretary of State. p. 2. Retrieved 7 July 2020.
  58. ^ Walton, E. P., ed. (1876). "Record of the Governor and Council at the Session of the General Assembly at Middlebury, Oct. 1800". Records of the Governor and Council of the State of Vermont. IV. Montpelier: Steam Press of J. & J. M. Poland. p. 258., citing Spooner's Vermont Journal of Oct. 27, 1800
  59. ^ Coolidge, A. J.; Mansfield, J. B. (1860). "Governors and Gubernatorial Vote". History and Description of New England: Vermont. Boston: Austin J. Coolidge. p. 964.
  60. ^ a b "Washington City. Monday, December 15, 1800". The national intelligencer and Washington advertiser. Washington, D.C. 15 December 1800. p. 3. Retrieved 7 July 2020.
  61. ^ Journal of the Senate of the Commonwealth of Virginia. Begun and held at the Capitol in the city of Richmond, on Monday the first day of December, one thousand eight hundred. Richmond, VA: Thomas Nicolson. 1800.
  62. ^ Preston, Daniel (2001). A Comprehensive Catalogue of the Correspondence and Papers of James Monroe. I. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press. p. 96. ISBN 0-313-31831-X.
  63. ^ "VA Governor, 1800". Our Campaigns. Retrieved 4 July 2020.
  64. ^ "Virginia 1800 Governor". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved 7 July 2020.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ John Drayton (Democratic-Republican) succeeded South Carolina Governor Edward Rutledge (Federalist) who died in office in January 1800.
  2. ^ Glashan records this election as taking place on 7 April.
  3. ^ A New Nation Votes records this election as taking place on 5-7 August.
  4. ^ As Lieutenant Governor, Gill became acting Governor on the death of Governor Increase Sumner on 7 June 1799.
  5. ^ Gill was re-elected Lieutenant Governor in an election held concurrently with the gubernatorial election.
  6. ^ Gill died in office on 20 May 1800. The Massachusetts Governor's Council headed by Thomas Dawes acted as Governor until Strong's inauguration on 30 May.
  7. ^ Some sources give Gerry's total as 17,060, and scattering votes as 350. This discrepancy depends on the allocation of 41 votes given for "Elbridge Garry."
  8. ^ Some sources describe Williams as a Democratic-Republican, although Broussard refers to him as "a quiet but unmistakeable Federalist" and "undeniably a Federalist", and Gilpatrick describes him as a "mild Federalist."[34] [35][36][37]
  9. ^ Some sources give Williams's total as 126.
  10. ^ Some contemporary sources give Taylor's total as 37.
  11. ^ Glashan records this election as taking place on 16 April.
  12. ^ As Lieutenant Governor, Drayton became acting Governor on the death of Governor Edward Rutledge on 23 January 1800.
  13. ^ Some sources give Smith's total as 3,239. This appears to be a calculation error made in contemporary sources which give county totals which add to 3,339. A New Nation Votes gives Smith's total as 3,360 on the basis of 21 votes not included in the county total for Windham County.
  14. ^ This is highly unlikely to be the correct date as it was a Sunday. The legislature met on 1 December.[61] Monroe acknowledged his election in a letter of 8 December.[62]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Glashan, Roy R. (1979). American Governors and Gubernatorial Elections, 1775-1978. Westport, CT: Meckler Books. ISBN 0-930466-17-9.
  • Gubernatorial Elections, 1787-1997. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Inc. 1998. ISBN 1-56802-396-0.
  • Dubin, Michael J. (2003). United States Gubernatorial Elections, 1776-1860: The Official Results by State and County. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland. ISBN 978-0-7864-1439-0.
  • Kallenbach, Joseph E.; Kallenbach, Jessamine S., eds. (1977). American State Governors, 1776-1976. I. Dobbs Ferry, N.Y.: Oceana Publications, Inc. ISBN 0-379-00665-0.
  • Broussard, James H. (1978). The Southern Federalists, 1800-1816. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press. ISBN 0-8071-0288-1.