1844 and 1845 United States House of Representatives elections

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1844 and 1845 United States House of Representatives elections

← 1842 / 43 July 1, 1844 – November 4, 1845[a] 1846 / 47 →

All 227[b][c]seats in the U.S. House of Representatives
115 seats needed for a majority
  Majority party Minority party
  John Wesley Davis.jpg Samuel Finley Vinton by howe.png
Leader John Davis Samuel Finley Vinton
Party Democratic Whig
Leader's seat Indiana 6th Ohio 12th
Last election 148 seats 73 seats
Seats won 140[b] 81
Seat change Decrease 8 Increase 8
Popular vote 1,276,980 1,143,305
Percentage 50.02% 44.79%
Swing Decrease 1.25% Increase 0.62%

  Third party Fourth party
 
Party Know Nothing Law and Order
Last election Pre-creation 2 seats
Seats won 6 0
Seat change Increase 6 Decrease 0
Popular vote 53,413 3,030
Percentage 2.09% 0.12%
Swing New Party Decrease 0.23%

  Fifth party
 
Party Independent
Last election 2 seats[d]
Seats won 0
Seat change Decrease 2
Popular vote 31,961
Percentage 1.25%
Swing Decrease 0.81%

Speaker before election

John Jones
Democratic

Elected Speaker

John Davis
Democratic

Elections to the United States House of Representatives for the 29th Congress were held at various dates in different states from July 1844 to November 1845.

All 227 elected members[c] took their seats when Congress convened December 1, 1845. The House elections spanned the 1844 Presidential election, won by dark horse Democratic candidate James K. Polk, who advocated territorial expansion. The new states of Texas and Iowa were added during this Congress, with Florida admitted on the last day of the previous Congress.

Democrats lost six seats but retained a large majority over the rival Whigs. The new American Party, based on the nativist "Know Nothing" movement characterized by opposition to immigration and anti-Catholicism, gained six seats.

Election summaries[edit]

One seat was added for the new State of Florida.[3] Texas and Iowa were admitted during this next Congress, but their initial elections were held in 1846.

142 6 79
Democratic [e] Whig
State Type Date Total
seats
Democratic Know Nothing Whig
Seats Change Seats Change Seats Change
Louisiana District July 1–3, 1844 4 3 Decrease1 0 Steady 1 Increase1
Illinois District August 5, 1844 7 6 Steady 0 Steady 1 Steady
Missouri At-large August 5, 1844 5 5 Steady 0 Steady 0 Steady
Georgia District[f] August 7, 1844 8 4 Decrease4 0 Steady 4 Increase4
Vermont District September 3, 1844 4 1 Steady 0 Steady 3 Steady
Maine District September 9, 1844 7 6 Increase1 0 Steady 1 Decrease1
Arkansas At-large October 8, 1844 1 1 Steady 0 Steady 0 Steady
Ohio District October 8, 1844 21 13 Increase1 0 Steady 8 Decrease1
Pennsylvania District October 8, 1844 24 12 Steady 2 Increase2 10 Decrease2
New Jersey District October 9, 1844 5 1 Decrease3 0 Steady 4 Increase3
South Carolina District October 14–15, 1844 7 7 Steady 0 Steady 0 Steady
Michigan District November 5, 1844 3 3 Steady 0 Steady 0 Steady
Massachusetts District November 11, 1844 10 0 Decrease2 0 Steady 10 Increase2
New York District November 11, 1844 34 21 Decrease3 4 Increase4 9 Decrease1
Delaware At-large November 12, 1844 1 0 Steady 0 Steady 1 Steady
Late electionsfter the March 4, 1845 beginning of term
New Hampshire At-large March 11, 1845 4[c] 3 Decrease1 0 Steady 0 Steady
Rhode Island District April 2, 1845 2 0 Steady 0 Steady 2 Increase2[g]
Connecticut District April 7, 1845 4 0 Decrease4 0 Steady 4 Increase4
Virginia District April 24, 1845 15 14 Increase2 0 Steady 1 Decrease2
Florida[h] At-large May 26, 1845 1 1 Increase1 0 Steady 0 Steady
Alabama District August 4, 1845 7 6 Steady 0 Steady 1 Steady
Indiana District August 4, 1845 10 8 Steady 0 Steady 2 Steady
Kentucky District August 4, 1845 10 3 Decrease1 0 Steady 7 Increase2
North Carolina District August 7, 1845 9 6 Increase1 0 Steady 3 Decrease1
Tennessee District August 7, 1845 11 6 Steady 0 Steady 5 Steady
Maryland District October 1, 1845 6 4 Increase4 0 Steady 2 Decrease4
Mississippi At-large November 3–4, 1845 4 4 Steady 0 Steady 0 Steady
Total 227[b][c] 142
62.6%
Decrease6 6
2.6%
Increase6 79
34.8%
Increase6
House seats
Democratic
62.56%
Know Nothing
2.64%
Whig
34.80%

Special elections[edit]

Florida[edit]

District Incumbent This race
Member Party First elected Results Candidates
Florida at-large None (New state) New seat.
New member elected late on May 26, 1845.
Democratic gain.
Winner did not serve, having also been elected U.S. senator.

Maryland[edit]

Late elections to the 28th Congress[edit]

Maryland elected its members to the 28th Congress in February 14, 1844, after that Congress had already convened in 1843 and long after the 1842–1843 election cycle.

District Incumbent This race
Member Party First elected Results Candidates
Maryland 1 Isaac D. Jones Whig 1841 Unknown if incumbent retired or lost re-election.
New member elected.
Whig hold.
Maryland 2
Maryland 3
Maryland 4
Maryland 5
Maryland 6

Regular elections to the 29th Congress[edit]

Maryland's October 1, 1845 elections were after the March 4, 1845 beginning of the new term, but still before the Congress convened in December 1845.

District Incumbent This race
Member Party First elected Results Candidates
Maryland 1 John Causin Whig 1844 Unknown if incumbent retired or lost re-election.
New member elected.
Whig hold.
Maryland 2
Maryland 3
Maryland 4
Maryland 5
Maryland 6

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Excludes states admitted during the 29th Congress
  2. ^ a b c Includes late elections
  3. ^ a b c d There was one vacancy in New Hampshire's delegation, unfilled for the duration of the 29th Congress.[1][2]
  4. ^ Includes one Independent and one Independent Whig.
  5. ^ There were 6 Know Nothings.
  6. ^ Changed from at-large
  7. ^ Previous election had 2 members of the short-lived Law and Order Party
  8. ^ New State

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dubin, p. 142–143.
  2. ^ Martis, p. 98-99.
  3. ^ Stat. 743

Bibliography[edit]

  • Dubin, Michael J. (March 1, 1998). United States Congressional Elections, 1788-1997: The Official Results of the Elections of the 1st Through 105th Congresses. McFarland and Company. ISBN 978-0786402830.
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (January 1, 1989). The Historical Atlas of Political Parties in the United States Congress, 1789-1989. Macmillan Publishing Company. ISBN 978-0029201701.
  • Moore, John L., ed. (1994). Congressional Quarterly's Guide to U.S. Elections (Third ed.). Congressional Quarterly Inc. ISBN 978-0871879967.
  • "Party Divisions of the House of Representatives* 1789–Present". Office of the Historian, House of United States House of Representatives. Retrieved January 21, 2015.

External links[edit]