1916 United States presidential election in Maryland

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1916 United States presidential election in Maryland

← 1912 November 7, 1916 1920 →
  Woodrow Wilson-H&E.jpg Governor Charles Evans Hughes.jpg
Nominee Woodrow Wilson Charles Evans Hughes
Party Democratic Republican
Home state New Jersey New York
Running mate Thomas R. Marshall Charles W. Fairbanks
Electoral vote 8 0
Popular vote 138,359 117,347
Percentage 52.80% 44.78%

Maryland Presidential Election Results 1916.svg
County Results

President before election

Woodrow Wilson
Democratic

Elected President

Woodrow Wilson
Democratic

The 1916 United States presidential election in Maryland took place on November 7, 1916, as part of the 1916 United States presidential election which was held throughout all contemporary 48 states. Voters chose eight representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Background and vote[edit]

With its history as a slave state and substantial historic secessionist support, Maryland had been strongly Democratic during the Third Party System despite having Federalist and Whig tendencies under previous systems.[1] However, hostility towards William Jennings Bryan’s free silver and Populist tendencies in the cities meant that the state shifted Republican in 1896[2] and became very close in subsequent elections during the “System of 1896”. Unlike former Confederate states and Oklahoma, Maryland did not succeed in disenfranchising its large black population despite several attempts,[3] which helped the Republicans remain highly competitive in early twentieth-century state elections.

The previous three elections had seen Maryland as the strongest Democratic state outside the former Confederacy, and in 1912 it was one of only four such states where incumbent President Woodrow Wilson exceeded the total vote of his divided Republican opposition from Taft and Roosevelt. Despite this, and the fact that four members of the state’s Progressive Party committee refused to endorse the reunified Republicans under Charles Evans Hughes,[4] leading GOP Senator Reed Smoot said late in September that he was confident Maryland could go Republican, although the poll still suggested Wilson would win narrowly.[5] Wilson did not campaign in the state at all, but Hughes’ campaign made a brief visit during the second week of October, which was not regarded as successful.[6]

Two days before the poll, Maryland was regarded as doubtful,[7] although there had been reports of a continued swing to Wilson a week previously.[8] As it turned out, the earlier prediction proved the better guide, with Wilson winning by 8.02 percent for his strongest performance in any antebellum Union state except Ohio, and becoming the first Democrat to win an absolute majority in Maryland since Grover Cleveland in 1892.[9]

Results[edit]

Presidential Candidate Running Mate Party Electoral Vote (EV) Popular Vote (PV)
Woodrow Wilson of New Jersey Thomas R. Marshall Democratic 8[10] 138,359 52.80%
Charles Evans Hughes Charles W. Fairbanks Republican 0 117,347 44.78%
Frank Hanly Ira Landrith Prohibition 0 2,903 1.11%
Allan L. Benson George Ross Kirkpatrick Socialist 0 2,674 1.02%
Arthur E. Reimer Caleb Harrison Labor 0 756 0.29%

Results by county[edit]

County Thomas Woodrow Wilson
Democratic
Charles Evans Hughes
Republican
James Franklin Hanly
Prohibition
Allan Louis Benson
Socialist
Arthur Elmer Reimer
Labor
Margin Total votes cast[11]
# % # % # % # % # % # %
Allegany 4,859 43.49% 5,760 51.56% 147 1.32% 377 3.37% 29 0.26% -901 -8.06% 11,172
Anne Arundel 4,111 57.77% 2,705 38.01% 134 1.88% 137 1.93% 29 0.41% 1,406 19.76% 7,116
Baltimore County 15,226 53.60% 12,633 44.47% 336 1.18% 158 0.56% 53 0.19% 2,593 9.13% 28,406
Baltimore City 60,226 53.58% 49,805 44.31% 836 0.74% 1,216 1.08% 330 0.29% 10,421 9.27% 112,413
Calvert 910 46.50% 975 49.82% 37 1.89% 27 1.38% 8 0.41% -65 -3.32% 1,957
Caroline 1,965 52.94% 1,666 44.88% 55 1.48% 7 0.19% 19 0.51% 299 8.05% 3,712
Carroll 4,016 51.66% 3,602 46.33% 108 1.39% 16 0.21% 32 0.41% 414 5.33% 7,774
Cecil 2,587 55.91% 1,959 42.34% 42 0.91% 13 0.28% 26 0.56% 628 13.57% 4,627
Charles 1,363 47.67% 1,374 48.06% 80 2.80% 9 0.31% 33 1.15% -11 -0.38% 2,859
Dorchester 2,750 51.69% 2,468 46.39% 76 1.43% 11 0.21% 15 0.28% 282 5.30% 5,320
Frederick 6,094 50.67% 5,725 47.61% 119 0.99% 75 0.62% 13 0.11% 369 3.07% 12,026
Garrett 1,031 34.90% 1,808 61.21% 35 1.18% 67 2.27% 13 0.44% -777 -26.30% 2,954
Harford 3,345 58.36% 2,302 40.16% 60 1.05% 16 0.28% 9 0.16% 1,043 18.20% 5,732
Howard 1,913 57.57% 1,346 40.51% 35 1.05% 11 0.33% 18 0.54% 567 17.06% 3,323
Kent 1,886 52.29% 1,673 46.38% 20 0.55% 12 0.33% 16 0.44% 213 5.91% 3,607
Montgomery 3,805 55.52% 2,913 42.50% 85 1.24% 43 0.63% 8 0.12% 892 13.01% 6,854
Prince George's 3,493 51.87% 3,058 45.41% 76 1.13% 83 1.23% 24 0.36% 435 6.46% 6,734
Queen Anne's 2,206 63.05% 1,242 35.50% 43 1.23% 3 0.09% 5 0.14% 964 27.55% 3,499
Somerset 1,885 42.81% 2,364 53.69% 105 2.38% 38 0.86% 11 0.25% -479 -10.88% 4,403
St. Mary's 1,443 55.27% 1,064 40.75% 57 2.18% 33 1.26% 14 0.54% 379 14.52% 2,611
Talbot 2,180 53.29% 1,753 42.85% 131 3.20% 19 0.46% 8 0.20% 427 10.44% 4,091
Washington 5,642 50.83% 5,093 45.88% 91 0.82% 267 2.41% 7 0.06% 549 4.95% 11,100
Wicomico 3,285 55.47% 2,539 42.87% 88 1.49% 5 0.08% 5 0.08% 746 12.60% 5,922
Worcester 2,138 55.87% 1,520 39.72% 107 2.80% 31 0.81% 31 0.81% 618 16.15% 3,827
Totals 138,359 52.80% 117,347 44.78% 2,903 1.11% 2,674 1.02% 756 0.29% 21,012 8.02% 262,039

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Phillips, Kevin P.; The Emerging Republican Majority, pp. 30, 130 ISBN 978-0-691-16324-6
  2. ^ Diamond, William; ‘Urban and Rural Voting in 1896’; The American Historical Review, vol. 46, no. 2 (January 1941), pp. 281-305
  3. ^ Shufelt, Gordeon H.; 'Jim Crow among strangers: The growth of Baltimore's Little Italy and Maryland's disfranchisement campaigns'; Journal of American Ethnic History; vol. 19, issue 4 (Summer 2000), pp. 49-78
  4. ^ ‘Maryland Moose for Hughes: Four Members of State Committee Dissent From I[E]ndorsement’; The Washington Post, September 17, 1916, p. 4
  5. ^ ‘Wilson Making Gains: Nation-wide Poll Shows Swing Toward the President’; Washington Post, October 8, 1916, p. 8
  6. ^ ‘Prosperity Blocked Way of Hughes in Maryland’; New York Times, October 11, 1916, p. 1
  7. ^ ‘Maryland, as Usual, Close Doubtful State, With Prophets Guessing Hughes’; Washington Post, November 5, 1916, p. A16
  8. ^ ‘Maryland Continues Its Swing to Wilson’; The Washington Post, October 29, 1916, p. 16
  9. ^ "Presidential General Election Results Comparison – Maryland". Dave Leip’s U.S. Election Atlas.
  10. ^ "1916 Presidential General Election Results – Maryland". Dave Leip’s U.S. Election Atlas.
  11. ^ Maryland State Board of Elections; Maryland Manual 1916-1917 pp. 262-266