1926 in Michigan

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Events from the year 1926 in Michigan.

Office holders[edit]

State office holders[edit]

Mayors of major cities[edit]

Federal office holders[edit]

Population[edit]

In the 1920 United States Census, Michigan was recorded as having a population of 3,668,412, ranking as the seventh most populous state in the country. By 1930, Michigan's population had increased by 32.0% to 4,842,325.

Cities[edit]

The following is a list of cities in Michigan with a population of at least 15,000 based on 1920 U.S. Census data. Historic census data from 1910 and 1930 is included to reflect trends in population increases or decreases.

1920
Rank
City County 1910 Pop. 1920 Pop. 1930 Pop. Change 1920-30
1 Detroit Wayne 465,766 993,678 1,568,662 57.9%
2 Grand Rapids Kent 112,571 137,634 168,592 22.5%
3 Flint Genesee 38,550 91,599 156,492 70.8%
4 Saginaw Saginaw 50,510 61,903 80,715 30.4%
5 Lansing Ingham 31,229 57,327 78,397 36.8%
6 Hamtramck Wayne 3,559 48,615 56,268 15.7%
7 Kalamazoo Kalamazoo 39,437 48,487 54,786 13.0%
8 Jackson Jackson 31,433 48,374 55,187 14.1%
9 Bay City Bay 45,166 47,554 47,355 −0.4%
10 Highland Park Wayne 4,120 46,499 52,959 13.9%
11 Muskegon Muskegon 24,062 36,570 41,390 15.2%
12 Battle Creek Calhoun 25,267 36,164 45,573 26.0%
13 Pontiac Oakland 14,532 34,273 64,928 89.4%
14 Port Huron St. Clair 18,863 25,944 31,361 20.9%
15 Ann Arbor Washtenaw 14,817 19,516 26,944 38.1%
16 Ironwood Gogebic 12,821 15,739 14,299 −9.1%

[1]

Boom cities of the 1920s[edit]

The 1920s saw an explosion of growth in the population of small cities near Detroit, with some communities growing more than three fold. Dearborn was the most extreme case, growing 20-fold from 2,470 to 50,358 persons.

1920
Rank
City County 1910 Pop. 1920 Pop. 1930 Pop. Change 1920-30
Warren Macomb 2,346 6,780 24,024 254.3%
Royal Oak Oakland 1,071 6,007 22,904 281.3%
Ferndale Oakland -- 2,640 20,855 690.0%
Dearborn Wayne 911 2,470 50,358 1,938.8%

[1]

Counties[edit]

The following is a list of counties in Michigan with populations of at least 40,000 based on 1920 U.S. Census data. Historic census data from 1910 and 1930 are included to reflect trends in population increases or decreases.

1920
Rank
County Largest city 1910 Pop. 1920 Pop. 1930 Pop. Change 1920-30
1 Wayne Detroit 531,591 1,177,645 1,888,946 60.4%
2 Kent Grand Rapids 159,145 183,041 240,511 31.4%
3 Genesee Flint 64,555 125,668 211,641 68.4%
4 Saginaw Saginaw 89,290 100,286 120,717 20.4%
5 Oakland Pontiac 49,576 90,050 211,251 134.6%
6 Ingham Lansing 53,310 81,554 116,587 43.0%
7 Calhoun Battle Creek 56,638 72,918 87,043 19.4%
8 Houghton Houghton 88,098 71,930 52,851 -26.5%
9 Jackson Jackson 53,426 72,539 92,304 27.2%
10 Kalamazoo Kalamazoo 60,327 71,225 91,368 28.3%
11 Bay Bay City 68,238 69,548 69,474 -0.1%
12 Berrien Niles 53,622 62,653 81,066 29.4%
13 Muskegon Muskegon 40,577 62,362 84,630 35.7%
14 St. Clair Port Huron 52,341 58,009 67,563 16.5%
15 Washtenaw Ann Arbor 44,714 49,520 65,530 32.3%
16 Lenawee Adrian 47,907 47,767 49,849 4.4%
17 Ottawa Holland 45,301 47,660 54,858 15.1%
18 Marquette Marquette 46,739 45,786 44,076 −3.7%

[2]

Sports[edit]

Baseball[edit]

American football[edit]

Basketball[edit]

Chronology of events[edit]

January[edit]

  • January 1 - The National Automobile Chamber of Commerce announced that vehicle production in 1925 reached an all-time high with 3,883,000 cars and 492,000 trucks.[9] The number of Ford Motor Co. employees in the United States had risen to 191,948.[10]
  • January 6 - Police supervised the seizure of property at the Detroit headquarters of the Ku Klux Klan at East Hancock Avenue and John R. Street following a judgment for nonpayment of rent. Members of the organization threatened violence against reporters covering the event.[11]
  • January 9 - Police conducted 69 raids resulting in arrests of 29 women and 26 men and seizure of 600 gallons of beer. The raids targeted "prohibition violators, disorderly houses and gambling resorts."[12]
  • John W. Smith was inaugurated for his second term as Mayor of Detroit. In an address to the city's Common Council, he urged respect for the laws of the city, state and country as a vital factor in American life.[13]

February[edit]

March[edit]

April[edit]

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

September[edit]

October[edit]

November[edit]

December[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Fourteenth Census of the United States Volume I Population 1920. United States Department of Commerce Bureauof the Census. 1921. pp. 232–236.
  2. ^ Fourteenth Census of the United States Volume I Population 1920. United States Department of Commerce Bureauof the Census. 1921. pp. 458–468.
  3. ^ "1926 Detroit Tigers Statistics". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved November 24, 2017.
  4. ^ "1926 Detroit Panthers Statistics & Players". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved November 24, 2017.
  5. ^ "1926 Football Team". Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan. Retrieved November 24, 2017.
  6. ^ "1926 Detroit Mercy Titans Schedule and Results". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved November 24, 2017.
  7. ^ "1926 Michigan State Spartans Schedule and Results". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved November 24, 2017.
  8. ^ "1925-26 Michigan Wolverines Roster and Stats". SR/CBB. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved November 24, 2017.
  9. ^ "Motor Output Is 4,375,000". Detroit Free Press. January 1, 1926. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ "Ford Workers in U.S. Now Number 191,948". Detroit Free Press. January 1, 1926. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ "Police Invade Headquarters of Ku Kluxers". Detroit Free Press. January 7, 1926. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  12. ^ "Police Nab 29 Women, 26 Men In Raids Here". Detroit Free Press. January 11, 1926. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  13. ^ "Mayor Smith Pleads for Law Enforcement". Detroit Free Press. January 13, 1926. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  14. ^ "Death Rings Down Curtain on Houdini". Detroit Free Press. November 1, 1926. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.