1952 Delhi Legislative Assembly election

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Delhi Legislative Assembly election, 1952

← N/A March 1952 1993 →

All 48 seats to the Delhi Legislative Assembly
25 seats needed for a majority
  First party Second party
  Flag of the Indian National Congress.svg
Leader Chaudhary Brahm Prakash
Party INC BJS
Leader's seat Nangloi Jat -
Seats before N/A N/A
Seats won 39 5
Seat change N/A N/A
Popular vote 2,71,812 1,14,207
Percentage 52.09% 21.89%

Chief Minister

Chaudhary Brahm Prakash
INC

Indian administrative divisions, as of 1951

The first Delhi Legislative Assembly election to the Delhi Legislative Assembly was held on 27 March 1952.[1][2] Forty-eight seats were up for election.[2] Six of the constituencies elected two assembly members, the remaining 36 constituencies elected a single member.[1]

Results[edit]

Congress emerged as the single largest party in the first legislative elections held in Delhi.[1] Chaudhary Brahm Prakash of Indian National Congress was elected Chief Minister.


e • d Summary of results of the Delhi Legislative Assembly election, 1952 [1]
Political Party Flag Seats
Contested
Won % of
Seats
Votes Vote %
Indian National Congress Flag of the Indian National Congress.svg 47 39 81.25 2,71,812 52.09
Bharatiya Jana Sangh 31 5 10.42 1,14,207 21.89
Socialist Party 6 2 4.17 12,396 2.38
Akhil Bharatiya Hindu Mahasabha 5 1 2.08 6,891 1.32
Independent 78 1 2.08 82,972 15.90
Total Seats 48 Voters 7,44,668 Turnout 5,21,766 (58.52 %)

State Reorganization[edit]

On 1 November 1956, under States Reorganisation Act, 1956, Delhi was made a Union Territory under the direct administration of the President of India and the Delhi Legislative Assembly was abolished simultaneously.[3] Next legislative assembly elections in Delhi were held in 1993, when Union Territory of Delhi was formally declared as National Capital Territory of Delhi by the Sixty-ninth Amendment to the Indian constitution.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Statistical Report on General Election, 1951 : To the Legislative Assembly of Delhi" (PDF). Election Commission of India. Retrieved 11 March 2014.
  2. ^ a b Kaushik, S. L.; Rama Patnayak (1995). Modern Governments and Political Systems. Vol. 3. New Delhi: Mittal Publications. p. 65.
  3. ^ "Reorganisation of States, 1955" (PDF). The Economic Weekly. 15 October 1955. Retrieved 25 July 2015.
  4. ^ "Sixty-ninth amendment". Delhi Assembly official website. Archived from the original on 21 August 2016.