1952 Illinois elections

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1952 Illinois elections

← 1950 November 4, 1952 1954 →
Turnout86.04%

Elections were held in Illinois on Tuesday, November 4, 1952.[1]

Primaries were held on April 8.[1][2]

The elections, in large part, saw a strong performance by the Republican Party.

The Republican Party retained control both chambers of the Illinois General Assembly and also won the Governorship, winning them a trifecta of state government control. They also swept all statewide elected executive offices. Additionally, they won all three seats for University of Illinois Trustees that were up for election.

For the first time since 1928, Illinois voted for the Republican presidential ticket, despite the fact that the Democratic ticket was headed by incumbent Illinois Governor Adlai Stevenson II.

Election information[edit]

Turnout[edit]

In the primary, 2,289,347 ballots were cast (891,991 Democratic and 1,397,356 Republican).[1][2]

In the general election, turnout was 86.04% with a total of 4,563,305 ballots cast.[1][3][4]

Federal elections[edit]

United States President[edit]

Illinois voted for the Republican ticket of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. They defeated the Democratic ticket of (incumbent Illinois Governor) Adlai Stevenson II and John Sparkman.

This was the first time since 1928 that Illinois had voted for the Republican presidential ticket. This came despite the fact that the Democratic ticket was headed by Stevenson.

United States House[edit]

Illinois had redistricted before this election, and had lost one seat due to reapportionment following the 1950 United States Census. All of Illinois' remaining 25 seats in the United States House of Representatives were up for election in 1952.

Before the election Republicans held 18 seats and Democrats held 8 seats from Illinois. In 1952, Republicans won 16 seats and Democrats won 9 seats.

State elections[edit]

Governor[edit]

1952 Illinois gubernatorial election

← 1948 November 4, 1952 1956 →
Turnout83.26%[1][4]
  William Stratton (1).jpg COL Sherwood Dixon (1).jpg
Nominee William Stratton Sherwood Dixon
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 2,317,363 2,089,721
Percentage 52.48% 47.32%

Illinois Governor Election Results by County, 1952.svg
County Results

Stratton:      50-60%      60-70%      70-80%

Dixon:      50–60%      60–70%

Governor before election

Adlai Stevenson II
Democratic

Elected Governor

William Stratton
Republican

Incumbent Governor Adlai Stevenson II, a Democrat, ultimately did not seek a second term, instead opting to run as his party's nominee for President of the United States. Republican William Stratton was elected to succeed him in office.

Before receiving the Democratic presidential nomination at the Democratic National Convention, Stevenson had been running for reelection as governor, even winning the Democratic primary. He was replaced as Democratic nominee for Governor by Lieutenant Governor Sherwood Dixon.

Stratton was considered to have ridden the coattails of Dwight D. Eisenhower's landslide victory in the state in the presidential election.[5][6] After being elected, at the age of 38, Stratton became the youngest governor in the country, and the youngest to have served as governor of Illinois in seven decades.[7]

Democratic primary[edit]

Gubernatorial Democratic primary[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Adlai E. Stevenson (incumbent) 708,275 99.97
Write-in Others 213 0.03
Total votes 708,488 100

Republican primary[edit]

Gubernatorial Republican primary[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican William G. Stratton 716,300 56.13
Republican Park Livingston 249,852 19.58
Republican Richard Yates Rowe 226,444 17.74
Republican William N. Erickson 68,851 5.40
Republican Anthony A. Polley 14,753 1.16
Write-in Others 67 0.01
Total votes 1,276,267 100

General election[edit]

Gubernatorial election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican William G. Stratton 2,317,363 52.48
Democratic Sherwood Dixon 2,089,721 47.32
Socialist Labor Louis Fisher 8,777 0.20
Write-in Others 3 0.00
Total votes 4,415,864 100

Lieutenant Governor[edit]

1952 Illinois lieutenant gubernatorial election

← 1948 November 4, 1952 1956 →
Turnout81.88%[1][4]
 
Nominee John William Chapman Herbert C. Paschen
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 2,291,812 2,043,021
Percentage 52.77% 47.05%

Lieutenant Governor before election

Sherwood Dixon
Democratic

Elected Lieutenant Governor

John William Chapman
Republican

Incumbent Lieutenant Governor Sherwood Dixon, a Democrat, ultimately did not seek reelection to a second term, instead opting to run for governor. Republican John William Chapman was elected to succeed him in office.

Before being made the Democratic nominee for governor (replacing Adlai Stevenson II, who opted to instead read for President for the United States), Dixon had been running for reelection, even winning the Democratic nomination. Judge Herbert C. Paschen replaced Dixon as the Democratic nominee for lieutenant governor.

Democratic primary[edit]

Lieutenant gubernatorial Democratic primary[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sherwood Dixon (incumbent) 629,332 100
Write-in Others 5 0.00
Total votes 578,390 100

Republican primary[edit]

Lieutenant gubernatorial Republican primary[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John William Chapman 480,908 43.12
Republican John D. Biggs 479,009 42.95
Republican Patrick S. Clary 155,332 13.93
Write-in Others 4 0.00
Total votes 1,115,253 100

General election[edit]

Lieutenant gubernatorial election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John William Chapman 2,291,812 52.77
Democratic Herbert C. Paschen 2,043,021 47.05
Socialist Labor Frank Schnur 7,836 0.18
Total votes 4,342,669 100

Attorney General[edit]

1952 Illinois Attorney General election

← 1948 November 4, 1952 1956 →
Turnout81.71%[1][4]
 
Nominee Latham Castle Ivan A. Elliott
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 2,269,082 2,056,411
Percentage 52.36% 47.46%

Attorney General before election

Ivan A. Elliott
Democratic

Elected Attorney General

Latham Castle
Republican

Incumbent Attorney General Ivan A. Elliott, a Democrat running for a second term, lost to Republican Latham Castle.

Democratic primary[edit]

Attorney General Democratic primary[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ivan A. Elliott (incumbent) 370,351 52.99
Democratic Joseph P. Burke 194,997 27.90
Democratic James L. Griffin 133,586 19.11
Total votes 698,934 100

Republican primary[edit]

Attorney General Republican primary[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Latham Castle 330,692 29.35
Republican Lee Daniels 252,999 22.46
Republican J. Roy Browning 200,880 17.83
Republican Conrad Noll 177,174 15.73
Republican Edward P. Saltiel 164,955 14.64
Write-in Others 2 0.00
Total votes 1,126,702

General election[edit]

Attorney General election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Latham Castle 2,269,082 52.36
Democratic Ivan A. Elliott (incumbent) 2,056,411 47.46
Socialist Labor Bernard Campbell 7,933 0.18
Total votes 4,333,426 100

Secretary of State[edit]

1952 Illinois Secretary of State election

← 1948 November 4, 1952 1956 →
Turnout82.80%[1][4]
 
Nominee Charles F. Carpentier Edward J. Barrett
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 2,196,327 2,187,024
Percentage 50.02% 49.81%

Secretary of State before election

Edward J. Barrett
Democratic

Elected Secretary of State

Edward J. Barrett
Republican

The Secretary of State Edward J. Barrett, a Democrat seeking a third term, was defeated by Republican Charles F. Carpentier.

Democratic primary[edit]

Secretary of State Democratic primary[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Edward J. Barrett (incumbent) 709,646 100
Write-in Others 4 0.00
Total votes 709,650 100

Republican primary[edit]

Secretary of State primary[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Charles F. Carpentier 455,994 39.97
Republican Warren E. Wright 449,549 39.41
Republican Harold R. Collier 125,044 10.96
Republican George R. Hedges 110,224 9.66
Write-in Others 4 0.00
Total votes 1,140,815

General election[edit]

Secretary of State election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Charles F. Carpentier 2,196,327 50.02
Democratic Edward J. Barrett (incumbent) 2,187,024 49.81
Socialist Labor Edward C. Gross 7,861 0.18
Total votes 4,391,212 100

Auditor of Public Accounts[edit]

1952 Illinois Auditor of Public Accounts election

← 1948 November 4, 1952 1956 →
Turnout81.94%[1][4]
 
Nominee Orville Hodge Benjamin O. Cooper
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 2,336,424 2,001,023
Percentage 53.77% 46.05%

Auditor of Public Accounts before election

Benjamin O. Cooper
Democratic

Elected Auditor of Public Accounts

Orville Hodge
Republican

Incumbent Auditor of Public Accounts Benjamin O. Cooper, a Democrat seeking a second term, was defeated by Republican Orville Hodge.

Democratic primary[edit]

Auditor of Public Accounts Democratic primary[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Benjamin O. Cooper (incumbent) 634,083 100
Write-in Others 2 0.00
Total votes 634,085 100

Republican primary[edit]

Auditor of Public Accounts Republican primary[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Orville E. Hodge 287,627 24.77
Republican James E. Hill 226,134 19.47
Republican Ralph Waldo Emerson 186,960 16.10
Republican Louis E. Nelson 174,987 15.07
Republican Richard J. Oglesby 113,091 9.74
Republican Arthur E. Larson 105,253 9.06
Republican William H. Brown 67,187 5.79
Write-in Others 2 0.00
Total votes 1,161,243

General election[edit]

Auditor of Public Accounts election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Orville E. Hodge 2,336,424 53.77
Democratic Benjamin O. Cooper (incumbent) 2,001,023 46.05
Socialist Labor Nick Mays 8,065 0.19
Total votes 4,345,512 100

Treasurer[edit]

1952 Illinois State Treasurer election

← 1950 November 4, 1952 1954 →
Turnout82.40%[1][4]
  Elmer J Hoffman (1).jpg 3x4.svg
Nominee Elmer J. Hoffman Fred A. Cain
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 2,366,170 1,996,132
Percentage 54.15% 45.68%

Treasurer before election

William Stratton
Republican

Elected Treasurer

Elmer J. Hoffman
Republican

Incumbent Treasurer William Stratton, a Republican, did not seek reelection to a second-consecutive (third overall) term, instead opting to run for governor. Republican Elmer J. Hoffman was elected to succeed him in office.

Democratic primary[edit]

Treasurer Democratic primary[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Fred A. Cain 628,356 100
Write-in Others 6 0.00
Total votes 628,362 100

Republican primary[edit]

Treasurer Republican primary[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Elmer J. Hoffman 471,668 62.86
Republican Leslie J. Smith 154,496 20.59
Republican William E. Wayland 124,244 16.56
Total votes 750,408

General election[edit]

Treasurer election[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Elmer J. Hoffman 2,366,170 54.15
Democratic Fred A. Cain 1,996,132 45.68
Socialist Labor Gregory P. Lyngas 7,755 0.18
Total votes 4,370,057 100

State Senate[edit]

Seats of the Illinois Senate were up for election in 1952. Republicans retained control of the chamber.

State House of Representatives[edit]

Seats in the Illinois House of Representatives were up for election in 1952. Republicans retained control of the chamber.

Trustees of University of Illinois[edit]

1952 Trustees of University of Illinois election
← 1950 November 4, 1952 1954 →

An election was held for three of the nine seats for Trustees of University of Illinois.[3] All three Republican nominees won.[3]

Republican incumbent Park Livingston was reelected to a third term.[8] Republican incumbent Doris Holt was reelected to a second term.[8] Joining them in being elected was fellow Republican Cushman Bissell.[3][8]

Trustees of the University of Illinois election[3][8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Park Livington (incumbent) 2,392,531½ 18.53
Republican Cushman B. Bissell 2,312,089 17.91
Republican Doris S. Holt (incumbent) 2,283,764 17.69
Democratic Harold Pogue 2,006,419½ 15.54
Democratic Charles E. Bliss 1,963,787 15.21
Democratic Julien H. Collins 1,929,105 14.94
Socialist Labor Helen L. Olsen 9,074 0.07
Socialist Labor Henry Schilling 8,431 0.07
Socialist Labor Oscar Haeggquist 8,172 0.06
Total votes 12,913,373 100

Ballot measures[edit]

Five statewide ballot measures were put before the residents of Illinois in 1952.

In order for constitutional amendments (of which all but one ballot measure was) to pass, they required either two-thirds support among those specifically voting on the measure or 50% support among all ballots cast in the elections.[9][10]

County Officers' Compensation Amendment[edit]

Voters approved the County Officers' Compensation Amendment, a legislatively referred constitutional amendment which amended Article X Section 10 of the 1870 Constitution of Illinois to establish rules for the compensation of county officer which stated that the compensation amount would be set by the county board and could not increase or diminish during the term of office.[1][3][11]

County Officers' Compensation Amendment[1][3][4]
Option Votes % of votes

on measure

% of all ballots
cast
Yes 2,024,823 67.40 44.37
No 979,401 32.60 21.46
Total votes 3,005,155 100 65.86
Voter turnout 56.66%

Double Liability Banking Amendment[edit]

Voters approved the Double Liability Banking Amendment, a legislatively referred constitutional amendment which amended Article XI Section 6 of the 1870 Constitution of Illinois to make it so that individual stockholders of banking institutions should not be personally liable to the creditors of the corporation.[1][3][12]

Double Liability Banking Amendment[1][3][4]
Option Votes % of votes

on measure

% of all ballots
cast
Yes 2,072,965 68.69 45.43
No 944,845 31.31 20.70
Total votes 3,017,810 100 66.13
Voter turnout 56.90%

General Banking Law Amendment[edit]

Voters approved the General Banking Law Amendment, a legislatively referred state statute which made changes to section 13 of the general banking law.[1][3]

General Banking Law Amendment[1][3][13][4]
Candidate Votes %
Yes 2,173,425 82.66
No 455,782 17.34
Total votes 2,629,207 100
Voter turnout 49.58%

Re-election of County Officers Amendment[edit]

The Re-election of County Officers Amendment, a legislatively referred constitutional amendment which would amend Article X Section 8 of the 1870 Constitution of Illinois create new rules for the election of officers in each county, failed to pass either threshold for adoption.[1][3][10]

Re-election of County Officers Amendment[1][3][4]
Option Votes % of votes

on measure

% of all ballots
cast
Yes 1,953,675 64.30 42.81
No 1,084,864 35.70 23.77
Total votes 3,038,539 100 66.59
Voter turnout 57.29%

Revenue Amendment[edit]

The Revenue Amendment, a legislatively referred constitutional amendment which would amend Article IX Sections 1, 2 3, 9, and 10 and repeal Section IX Section 13 to modify the power of the legislature to levy taxes, failed to reach either threshold required for adoption.[1][3][14]

Double Liability Banking Amendment[1][3][4]
Option Votes % of votes

on measure

% of all ballots
cast
Yes 1,838,596 61.37 40.29
No 1,157,406 38.63 25.36
Total votes 2,996,002 100 65.65
Voter turnout 56.49%

Local elections[edit]

Local elections were held.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t "OFFICIAL VOTE of the STATE OF ILLINOIS Cast at the GENERAL ELECTION, NOVEMBER 4, 1952 JUDICIAL ELECTION, 1951 • PRIMARY ELECTION GENERAL PRIMARY, APRIL 8 1952" (PDF). Illinois State Board of Elections. Retrieved 11 July 2020.[permanent dead link]
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Illinois Blue Book 1951-1952. Illinois Secretary of State. pp. 757–758. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u Illinois Blue Book 1953-1954. Illinois Secretary of State. pp. 823–24. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "OFFICIAL VOTE Cast at the GENERAL ELECTION NOVEMBER 2, 1982" (PDF). www.elections.il.gov. Illinois State Board of Elections. Retrieved 4 July 2020.[permanent dead link]
  5. ^ "Former Illinois Governor William G. Stratton dies at 86". The Quad-City Times. Associated Press. Retrieved 22 December 2020.
  6. ^ "William G. Stratton Collection · Chronicling Illinois". alplm-cdi.com. Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum. Retrieved 22 December 2020.
  7. ^ "Gov. William G. Stratton (R-Morris): "Good government is good politics."". www.thecaucusblog.com. Illinois House Republicans. Retrieved 22 December 2020.
  8. ^ a b c d "Trustees, University of Illinois Board of Trustees" (PDF). University of Illinois. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  9. ^ 1870 Illinois Constituton Article XIV
  10. ^ a b "Illinois Re-election of County Officers Amendment (1952)". Ballotpedia. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  11. ^ "Illinois County Officers' Compensation Amendment (1952)". Ballotpedia. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  12. ^ "Illinois Double Liability Banking Amendment (1952)". Ballotpedia. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  13. ^ "Illinois Constitutional Convention Question (1968)". Ballotpedia. Retrieved 29 March 2020.
  14. ^ "Illinois Revenue Amendment (1952)". Ballotpedia. Retrieved 1 April 2020.