1960 in Michigan

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Events from the year 1960 in Michigan.

The top stories of the year in Michigan included: (1) the nomination and election of John Swainson, a 35-year-old double amputee, as Governor of Michigan; (2) the decision of G. Mennen Williams not to run for a seventh term as Governor; (3) the selection of Michigan's Nancy Fleming as Miss America; (4) John F. Kennedy's taking Michigan's electoral votes over Richard M. Nixon; (5) the selection of Robert McNamara as President of Ford Motor Company and then as Secretary of Defense; and (6) the Detroit Tigers' trade of batting champion Harvey Kuenn to the Cleveland Indians in exchange for Rocky Colavito.[1]

Office holders[edit]

State office holders[edit]

Mayors of major cities[edit]

Mayor Miriani

Federal office holders[edit]

Sen. Hart

Population[edit]

In the 1960 United States Census, Michigan was recorded as having a population of 7,823,194 persons, ranking as the seventh most populous state in the country. By 1970, the state's population had grown 13.4% to 8,875,083 persons.

Cities[edit]

The following is a list of cities in Michigan with a population of at least 60,000 based on 1960 U.S. Census data. Historic census data from 1950 and 1970 is included to reflect trends in population increases or decreases. Cities that are part of the Detroit metropolitan area are shaded in tan.

1960
Rank
City County 1950 Pop. 1960 Pop. 1970 Pop. Change
1960-70
1 Detroit Wayne 1,849,568 1,670,144 1,514,063 −9.3% Decrease
2 Flint Genesee 163,143 196,940 193,317 −1.8% Decrease
3 Grand Rapids Kent 176,515 177,313 197,649 11.5% Increase
4 Dearborn Wayne 94,994 112,007 104,199 −7.0% Decrease
5 Lansing Ingham 92,129 107,807 131,403 21.9% Increase
6 Saginaw Saginaw 92,918 98,265 91,849 −6.5% Decrease
7 Warren Macomb 42,653 89,246 179,260 100.2% Increase
8 Pontiac Oakland 73,681 82,233 85,279 3.7% Increase
9 Kalamazoo Kalamazoo 57,704 82,089 85,555 4.1% Increase
10 Royal Oak Oakland 46,898 80,612 86,238 7.0% Increase
11 St. Clair Shores Macomb 19,823 76,657 88,093 14.9% Increase
12 Ann Arbor Washtenaw 48,251 67,340 100,035 48.6% Increase
13 Livonia Wayne 17,634 66,702 110,109 65.1% Increase
14 Dearborn Heights Wayne 20,235 61,118 80,069 31.0% Increase
15 Westland Wayne 30,407 60,743 86,749 42.8% Increase

Counties[edit]

The following is a list of counties in Michigan with populations of at least 100,000 based on 1960 U.S. Census data. Historic census data from 1950 and 1970 are included to reflect trends in population increases or decreases. Counties that are part of the Detroit metropolitan area are shaded in tan.

1960
Rank
County Largest city 1950 Pop. 1960 Pop. 1970 Pop. Change
1960-70
1 Wayne Detroit 2,435,235 2,666,297 2,666,751 0.0% Increase
2 Oakland Pontiac 396,001 690,259 907,871 31.5% Increase
3 Macomb Warren 184,961 405,804 625,309 54.1% Increase
4 Genesee Flint 270,963 374,313 444,341 18.7% Increase
5 Kent Grand Rapids 288,292 363,187 411,044 13.2% Increase
6 Ingham Lansing 172,941 211,296 261,039 23.5% Increase
7 Saginaw Saginaw 153,515 190,752 219,743 15.2% Increase
8 Washtenaw Ann Arbor 134,606 172,440 234,103 35.8% Increase
9 Kalamazoo Kalamazoo 126,707 169,712 201,550 18.8% Increase
10 Berrien Benton Harbor 115,702 149,865 163,875 9.3% Increase
11 Calhoun Battle Creek 120,813 138,858 141,963 2.2% Increase
12 Jackson Jackson 108,168 131,994 143,274 8.5% Increase
13 Muskegon Muskegon 121,545 129,943 157,426 21.2% Increase
14 St. Clair Port Huron 91,599 107,201 120,175 12.1% Increase
15 Bay Bay City 88,461 107,042 117,339 9.6% Increase
16 Monroe Monroe 75,666 101,120 118,479 17.2% Increase

Sports[edit]

Baseball[edit]

American football[edit]

Basketball[edit]

Ice hockey[edit]

1960 Olympics[edit]

The following athletes with ties to Michigan won medals in the 1960 Winter Olympics in Squaw Valley or the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome:

Other[edit]

  • Port Huron to Mackinac Boat Race – The X-Touche owned by Moon Baker and Jerry Clements of Detroit was the overall winner, finishing the race on July 18 in 53 hours, 8 minutes, and 51 seconds and a corrected time of 39 hours, 19 minutes, and 39 seconds.[23]
  • Michigan OpenJohn Barnum of Grand Rapids won the tournament on August 28 at the Lakepointe Country Club in Detroit. It was his third Michigan Open championship.[24]

Chronology of events[edit]

January[edit]

  • January 10 - McMorran Auditorium was dedicated in Port Huron, Michigan. At the ceremony, architect Alden Dow presented the keys to Wilbur S. Davidson. The auditorium, named after Henry McMorran, was built at a cost of $1.35 million (equivalent to $11,602,911 in 2018). Plans were also announced to build a sports arena just west of the auditorium.[25] Opening night on January 11 featured "An Evening with Victor Borge, comedian-pianist.[26]

February[edit]

March[edit]

April[edit]

  • April 17 - The Detroit Tigers traded Harvey Kuenn, the 1959 American League batting champion, to the Cleveland Indians for Rocky Colavito, who tied for the American League lead with 42 home runs.[29]
  • April 28 - William C. Newberg was named President of Chrysler Corporation. Lester L. (Tex) Colbert was promoted to board chairman.[30] Newberg was forced out two months later on June 30 after it was revealed that he had substantial ownership interests in two companies that had supplied parts to Chrysler.[31]

May[edit]

  • May 20 - The freighters Standard Portland Cement and the Andrew Ziesing collided in the ship channel in lower Lake Huron two miles north of the Blue Water Bridge. The Standard Portland Cement, loaded with 8,000 tons of taconite, sank in 22 feet of water; all crew members survived.[32]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

  • August 2 - Lt. Gov. John Swainson defeated Attorney General James M. Hare in an upset victory in the primary for the Democratic Party's nomination for Governor. Paul D. Bagwell was unopposed for the Republican Party's nomination.[33]
  • August 3 - After swapping batting stars in April, the Detroit Tigers and Cleveland Indians swapped managers, Joe Gordon coming to Detroit and Jimmy Dykes going to Cleveland. The deal was the first trade of managers in major league history.[34]

September[edit]

October[edit]

  • October 11 - John Fetzer bought out five other owners of the Detroit Tigers to become the club's controlling owner.
  • October 13 - Cobo Hall, a convention center built at a cost of $54 million (equivalent to $464,116,438 in 2018) on the riverfront in Detroit, was dedicated before a crowd of 3,000 persons. The Detroit Free Press called it "a huge triumph of civic purpose."[36]
  • October 15–23 - The National Auto Show was held at Cobo Hall, the first time it was held in Detroit.
  • October 21 - L. C. Walker Arena opened in Muskegon, Michigan. Opening night featured a hockey game in which the Muskegon Zephyrs lost to Toledo; attendance was approximately 2,000, far below the capacity of 6,000 persons. Vice President Richard M. Nixon appeared at the dedication ceremony on October 24.

November[edit]

  • November 6 - The Detroit Times published its final issue after 60 years.
  • November 8
  • November 9 - Robert McNamara, at age 44, was named President of Ford Motor Company.[40]
  • November 30 - The Francisco Morazan, a Liberian freighter, ran aground off South Manitou Island in Lake Michigan. The ship was caught in a storm with 52-mile-per-hour winds and high swells.[41] The pregnant wife of the captain was evacuated from the ship on December 1.[42] The 14 remaining crew members were taken from the ship on December 5 as weather worsened and the ship's hull ruptured.[43]

December[edit]

Births[edit]

Gallery of 1960 births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

Gallery of 1960 deaths[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Politics Topped 1960 News: Editors Pick State's Top Stories". The News-Palladium (AP story). December 27, 1960. p. 13 – via Newspapers.com.
  2. ^ "1960 Detroit Tigers Statistics". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 28, 2017.
  3. ^ "2012 University of Michigan Baseball Record Book" (PDF). University of Michigan. 2012. pp. 22, 71. Retrieved August 9, 2017.
  4. ^ 2012 Record Book, p. 13.
  5. ^ "1960 Detroit Lions Statistics & Players". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 8, 2017.
  6. ^ "1960 Michigan State Spartans Stats". Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 8, 2017.
  7. ^ "1960 Michigan Wolverines Stats". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 8, 2017.
  8. ^ "1960 Detroit Mercy Titans Stats". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 8, 2017.
  9. ^ "Football Records: Annual Results". Western Michigan University. Retrieved August 8, 2017.
  10. ^ "2016 Football Media Guide" (PDF). Wayne State University. pp. 111, 114. Retrieved August 9, 2017.
  11. ^ "Central Michigan 2015 Football Media Guide" (PDF). Central Michigan University. 2015. pp. 100, 110. Retrieved August 8, 2017.
  12. ^ "2014 Digital Media Guide: Eastern Michigan University" (PDF). Eastern Michigan University Football. pp. 169, 176. Retrieved August 8, 2017.
  13. ^ "1959–60 Detroit Pistons Roster and Stats". Basketball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 8, 2017.
  14. ^ "1959–60 Detroit Titans Schedule and Results". SR/CBB. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 8, 2017.
  15. ^ "1959–60 Michigan State Spartans Roster and Stats". SR/CBB. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 8, 2017.
  16. ^ "1959–60 Michigan Wolverines Schedule and Results". SR/CBB. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 8, 2017.
  17. ^ "1959–60 Western Michigan Broncos Schedule and Results". SR/CBB. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 8, 2017.
  18. ^ "1959–60 Detroit Red Wings Roster and Statistics". Hockey-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 8, 2017.
  19. ^ "Michigan Tech Team History". College Hockey News. Retrieved August 8, 2017.
  20. ^ "Michigan Team History". College Hockey News. Retrieved August 8, 2017.
  21. ^ "Michigan State Team History". College Hockey News. Retrieved August 8, 2017.
  22. ^ "Michigan State Family Toasts 'Their Girl' on Winning Olympic Title". Lansing State Journal. February 24, 1960. p. 33 – via Newspapers.com.
  23. ^ "X-Touche Is Tops In Mackinac". Port Huron Times Herald. July 19, 1960. p. 10 – via Newspapers.com.
  24. ^ "Barnum Wins 3rd State Open". Detroit Free Press. August 29, 1960. p. 33 – via Newspapers.com.
  25. ^ "To Build Sports Arena: McMorran Auditorium Donors Announce Plans at Dedication". Port Huron Times Herald. January 11, 1960. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  26. ^ "McMorran Auditorium's Opening Week Schedule". Port Huron Times Herald. January 11, 1960. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  27. ^ "Soapy: No 7th Term; Governor Moves Into National Role; Hare-Swainson Battle Looms". Detroit Free Press. March 3, 1960. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  28. ^ "Clear Way For College: Bill Authorizing New Grand Valley School Goes to Governor". The Lansing State Journal. April 13, 1960. p. 20 – via Newspapers.com.
  29. ^ "Tigers Trade Kuenn For Rocky Colavito: 'Need Power,' DeWitt Says". Detroit Free Press. April 18, 1960. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  30. ^ "Colbert Still In Charge After Chrysler Shuffle: Newberg 2nd To Chairman". Detroit Free Press. April 29, 1960. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  31. ^ "Newberg Tied To 2 Firms; Suit Filed". Detroit Free Press. July 29, 1960. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  32. ^ "4 Ships In Collisions: One Reported On Channel Bottom; Crew All Safe". Port Huron Times Herald. May 20, 1960. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  33. ^ "Swainson Is Winner Over Hare In Upset: Takes Over as State Dem Leader; Bentley Cops Senate Race". Detroit Free Press. August 3, 1960. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  34. ^ Hal Middlesworth (August 4, 1960). "This Beats All – Dykes for Gordon! Tigers, Indians Try a New Twist – Swap Managers". Detroit Free Press. p. 29 – via Newspapers.com.
  35. ^ "Montague's Might Proud: 'That's Our Girl!'". Detroit Free Press. December 27, 1960. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  36. ^ "Hail New Era At Cobo Hall". Detroit Free Press. October 14, 1960. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  37. ^ a b c "Latest Tabulation In State". Detroit Free Press. November 11, 1960. p. 42 – via Newspapers.com.
  38. ^ "Swainson In By 40,000". Detroit Free Press. November 10, 1960. pp. 1, 5 – via Newspapers.com.
  39. ^ "Latest Official Election Results". Detroit Free Press. November 10, 1960. p. 34 – via Newspapers.com.
  40. ^ "McNamara New Chief At Ford". Detroit Free Press. November 10, 1960. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  41. ^ "14 Stick to Ship Lashed by Wind". Detroit Free Press. December 1, 1960. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  42. ^ "Wife of Captain Of Battered Ship Is Taken Ashore". Lansing State Journal. December 2, 1960. p. 18 – via Newspapers.com.
  43. ^ "14 Crewmen from Stranded Freighter Brought Ashore Here". Traverse City Record-Eagle. December 5, 1960. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  44. ^ "Williams' New Post Is 'Second to None'". Detroit Free Press. December 2, 1960. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  45. ^ "McNamara Gets Post of Defense Secretary: Ford Chief To Quit Job 'At Once'". Detroit Free Press. December 14, 1960. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  46. ^ "Caryl Chessman Dies in Gas Chamber". Ironwood Daily Globe. May 2, 1960. p. 1.
  47. ^ "Ex-Hockey Player Dies Of Heart Attack". The Palladium-Item and Sun-Telegram. August 10, 1960. p. 8.
  48. ^ "Fred Knorr's Body Is Returned For Burial". Detroit Free Press. December 28, 1960. p. 2 – via Newspapers.com.
  49. ^ "Ex-Marquette Banker Dies". Ironwood Daily Globe. January 3, 1961. p. 7 – via Newspapers.com.