1964 in Michigan

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Events from the year 1964 in Michigan.

The Associated Press (AP) and United Press International (UPI) each selected the top 10 news stories in Michigan as follows:[1][2]

  1. The November 3 re-election of Republican George W. Romney as Governor of Michigan, despite a Democratic landslide in the U.S. Presidential and legislative races (AP-1, UPI-1);[3]
  2. Reapportionment of state and federal legislative districts, requiring districts to be redrawn "as nearly as practicable" equal in population, resulting in Democrats seizing control of both houses of the Michigan Legislature and the Congressional delegation (AP-2, UPI-2 [reapportionment] and UPI-4 [Democratic control of legislature]);
  3. New contracts between the United Auto Workers (UAW) and the automobile manufacturers providing a lower retirement age and providing for higher pensions, reached after costly strikes against General Motors and Ford Motor Company (AP-3, UPI-3);
  4. A 134-day newspaper strike called by the International Printing Pressmen and Assistants Union that shut down both the Detroit Free Press and The Detroit News from July 14 until November 25, the longest strike shutdown of metropolitan daily newspapers in American history (AP-5, UPI-5);[4]
  5. A May 8 tornado that struck Chesterfield Township in Macomb County, resulting in 13 deaths, injuries to at least 400 persons, and $14 million in damage (AP-4, UPI-7);[1][5][6]
  6. National Guard scandals arising out of questionable land sales at Camp Grayling and alleged mishandling of armory and liquor funds (AP-7, UPI-6);[1]
  7. A strike against Essex Wire Corp. in Hillsdale, Michigan, and the deployment of national guardsman when the company resumed operations with non-union workers (AP-8, UPI-8);[7][8]
  8. A booming economy in Michigan (AP-6);
  9. Concern over the Great Lakes reaching their lowest water levels in 100 years (AP-9);[9]
  10. Revelation that Daniel West, a successful candidate for the Michigan House of Representatives, had lied about being an honors graduate of Yale Law School and concealed an extensive criminal record (UPI-9);
  11. The success of University of Michigan sports teams with Big Ten Conference championships in football, indoor track, wrestling, and gymnastics, a co-championship in basketball, a national championship in men's ice hockey, and second-place finishes in outdoor track, tennis, and baseball (AP-10);[1] and
  12. The exposure of Thomas M. Novak as a fraud after four year practicing medicine without a license (UPI-10).

The United Press International (UPI) picked the state's top sports stories as follows:[10]

  1. The success of the 1964 Michigan Wolverines football team in compiling an 8–1 record in the regular season, winning the Big Ten Conference championship, and receiving a bid to play in the 1965 Rose Bowl;
  2. William Clay Ford Sr.'s firing of the Detroit Lions' five assistant coaches and the resignation two days later of head coach George Wilson;
  3. Michigan athletes winning 11 medals at the Olympics;
  4. The 1963–64 Michigan Wolverines men's basketball team's Big Ten championship and advancing to the Final Four at the 1964 NCAA University Division Basketball Tournament;
  5. The decision of the University of Detroit to terminate its football program;
  6. Dave DeBusschere serving as player and head coach of the Detroit Pistons;
  7. The return of Ted Lindsay to the Detroit Red Wings at age 39 and after four years of retirement;
  8. The death of Eddie Sachs of Warren, Michigan, in a cash while competing in the Indianapolis 500 on May 30;
  9. The 1963–64 Detroit Red Wings, after a mediocre regular season, advancing to the 1964 Stanley Cup Final and narrowly losing in seven games to the Toronto Maple Leafs; and
  10. The Michigan high school basketball championships won by Benton Harbor (Class A), River Rouge (Class B), Grosse Pointe St. Paul (Class C), and Briton-Macon (Class D).

Office holders[edit]

State office holders[edit]

Gov. Romney

Mayors of major cities[edit]

Mayor Cavanagh

Federal office holders[edit]

Sen. Hart

Population[edit]

In the 1960 United States Census, Michigan was recorded as having a population of 7,823,194 persons, ranking as the seventh most populous state in the country. By 1970, the state's population had grown 13.4% to 8,875,083 persons.

Cities[edit]

The following is a list of cities in Michigan with a population of at least 60,000 based on 1960 U.S. Census data. Historic census data from 1950 and 1970 is included to reflect trends in population increases or decreases. Cities that are part of the Detroit metropolitan area are shaded in tan.

1960
Rank
City County 1950 Pop. 1960 Pop. 1970 Pop. Change
1960-70
1 Detroit Wayne 1,849,568 1,670,144 1,514,063 −9.3% Decrease
2 Flint Genesee 163,143 196,940 193,317 −1.8% Decrease
3 Grand Rapids Kent 176,515 177,313 197,649 11.5% Increase
4 Dearborn Wayne 94,994 112,007 104,199 −7.0% Decrease
5 Lansing Ingham 92,129 107,807 131,403 21.9% Increase
6 Saginaw Saginaw 92,918 98,265 91,849 −6.5% Decrease
7 Warren Macomb 42,653 89,246 179,260 100.2% Increase
8 Pontiac Oakland 73,681 82,233 85,279 3.7% Increase
9 Kalamazoo Kalamazoo 57,704 82,089 85,555 4.1% Increase
10 Royal Oak Oakland 46,898 80,612 86,238 7.0% Increase
11 St. Clair Shores Macomb 19,823 76,657 88,093 14.9% Increase
12 Ann Arbor Washtenaw 48,251 67,340 100,035 48.6% Increase
13 Livonia Wayne 17,634 66,702 110,109 65.1% Increase
14 Dearborn Heights Wayne 20,235 61,118 80,069 31.0% Increase
15 Westland Wayne 30,407 60,743 86,749 42.8% Increase

Counties[edit]

The following is a list of counties in Michigan with populations of at least 100,000 based on 1960 U.S. Census data. Historic census data from 1950 and 1970 are included to reflect trends in population increases or decreases. Counties that are part of the Detroit metropolitan area are shaded in tan.

1960
Rank
County Largest city 1950 Pop. 1960 Pop. 1970 Pop. Change
1960-70
1 Wayne Detroit 2,435,235 2,666,297 2,666,751 0.0% Increase
2 Oakland Pontiac 396,001 690,259 907,871 31.5% Increase
3 Macomb Warren 184,961 405,804 625,309 54.1% Increase
4 Genesee Flint 270,963 374,313 444,341 18.7% Increase
5 Kent Grand Rapids 288,292 363,187 411,044 13.2% Increase
6 Ingham Lansing 172,941 211,296 261,039 23.5% Increase
7 Saginaw Saginaw 153,515 190,752 219,743 15.2% Increase
8 Washtenaw Ann Arbor 134,606 172,440 234,103 35.8% Increase
9 Kalamazoo Kalamazoo 126,707 169,712 201,550 18.8% Increase
10 Berrien Benton Harbor 115,702 149,865 163,875 9.3% Increase
11 Calhoun Battle Creek 120,813 138,858 141,963 2.2% Increase
12 Jackson Jackson 108,168 131,994 143,274 8.5% Increase
13 Muskegon Muskegon 121,545 129,943 157,426 21.2% Increase
14 St. Clair Port Huron 91,599 107,201 120,175 12.1% Increase
15 Bay Bay City 88,461 107,042 117,339 9.6% Increase
16 Monroe Monroe 75,666 101,120 118,479 17.2% Increase

Sports[edit]

Baseball[edit]

American football[edit]

Basketball[edit]

Ice hockey[edit]

Golf[edit]

Boat racing[edit]

Music[edit]

Detroit's Motown record label had many hits in 1964, including the following:

Chronology of events[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

March[edit]

April[edit]

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

September[edit]

October[edit]

November[edit]

  • November 3

December[edit]

Births[edit]

Gallery of 1964 births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

Gallery of 1964 deaths[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Romney's Victory Rated Top State Story". The Evening News (Sault Sainte Marie). December 31, 1964. p. 7 – via Newspapers.com.
  2. ^ "Romney Victory Rated Top State News Story of '64". Traverse City Record-Eagle (UPI story). December 28, 1964. p. 18 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ "Governor Beats LBJ Landslide". Lansing State Journal. November 4, 1964. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  4. ^ "Longest Newspaper Tie-Up Ends". Detroit Free Press. November 25, 1964. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  5. ^ "Tornado Kills 10: Hundreds Hurt in Macomb, Oakland; Anchor Bay a Shambles". Detroit Free Press. May 9, 1964. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ "U.S. State Rush to Help Homeless in Tornado Area". Detroit Free Press. May 10, 1964. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ "Troops In Hillsdale After Fresh Outbreak: Jail Virtually Stormed; Romney Orders Essex Production Stopped In Emergency; Picketing Banned; Guards Disarmed; Local Officials Left In Charge". The Hillsdale Evening News. May 28, 1964. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ "Essex Plant Reopens, Strike Scene Orderly". The Hillsdale Daily News. June 3, 1964. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ "Officials Meet To Study Lakes Water Levels". Escanaba Daily Press. July 28, 1964. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ "Michigan' Football Team Is No. 1 Story". The Holland Evening Sentinel. December 31, 1964. p. 14 – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ "1964 Detroit Tigers Statistics". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 18, 2017.
  12. ^ "2012 University of Michigan Baseball Record Book" (PDF). University of Michigan. 2012. pp. 22, 71. Retrieved August 18, 2017.
  13. ^ 2012 Record Book, p. 13.
  14. ^ "1964 Detroit Lions Statistics & Players". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 18, 2017.
  15. ^ "1964 Michigan Wolverines Stats". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 18, 2017.
  16. ^ "1964 Michigan State Spartans Stats". Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 18, 2017.
  17. ^ "Football Records: Annual Results". Western Michigan University. Retrieved August 18, 2017.
  18. ^ "Central Michigan 2015 Football Media Guide" (PDF). Central Michigan University. 2015. pp. 100, 110. Retrieved August 18, 2017.
  19. ^ "2014 Digital Media Guide: Eastern Michigan University" (PDF). Eastern Michigan University Football. pp. 169, 176. Retrieved August 18, 2017.
  20. ^ "2016 Football Media Guide" (PDF). Wayne State University. pp. 111, 114. Retrieved August 18, 2017.
  21. ^ "1963–64 Detroit Pistons Roster and Stats". Basketball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 18, 2017.
  22. ^ "1963–64 Michigan Wolverines Schedule and Results". SR/CBB. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 18, 2017.
  23. ^ "1963–64 Michigan State Spartans Roster and Stats". SR/CBB. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 18, 2017.
  24. ^ "1963–64 Detroit Titans Roster and Stats". SR/CBB. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 18, 2017.
  25. ^ "1963–64 Western Michigan Broncos Schedule and Results". SR/CBB. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 18, 2017.
  26. ^ "1963–64 Detroit Red Wings Roster and Statistics". Hockey-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 18, 2017.
  27. ^ "Michigan Team History". College Hockey News. Retrieved August 18, 2017.
  28. ^ "Michigan Hockey Record Book" (PDF). University of Michigan. p. 2.
  29. ^ "Michigan Tech Team History". College Hockey News. Retrieved August 18, 2017.
  30. ^ "Michigan State Team History". College Hockey News. Retrieved August 18, 2017.
  31. ^ "Lema's Win in Buick Open 2nd in Consecutive Weeks". Battle Creek Enquirer. June 15, 1964. p. 13 – via Newspapers.com.
  32. ^ "Rosely Is Winner In Michigan Open". Battle Creek Enquirer. August 17, 1964. p. 11 – via Newspapers.com.
  33. ^ "Ron Musson Defends Gold Cup Championship". The Holland Evening Sentinel. July 6, 1964. p. 4 – via Newspapers.com.
  34. ^ "Final Figures Give Romney 377,238-Vote Edge". Port Huron Times Herald. November 8, 1964. p. 13 – via Newspapers.com.
  35. ^ "Traverse City's Bill Milliken Steps Up to Lt. Governorship". Traverse City Record-Eagle. November 4, 1964. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  36. ^ "U.S. Senate Race County Vote Tally". The Holland Evening Sentinel. November 9, 1964. p. 2 – via Newspapers.com.
  37. ^ "2 State Negroes Win In Congressional Races". The Detroit Daily Press. November 4, 1964. p. 3 – via Newspapers.com.
  38. ^ "Royal Oak OK's Liquor by Glass". The Detroit Daily Press. November 4, 1964. p. 3 – via Newspapers.com.
  39. ^ "Norman Z. McLeod, Film Director, Dies". Los Angeles Times. January 28, 1964. p. 2 – via Newspapers.com.
  40. ^ "State's Dean In Congress Dead At 59". The Detroit Daily Press. August 10, 1964. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  41. ^ "Obituaries: Neil McMillan". The Detroit Daily Press. October 11, 1964. p. 3 – via Newspapers.com.