1974 in Michigan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Events from the year 1974 in Michigan.

The Associated Press (AP) selected the top news stories of 1974 in Michigan as follows:[1]

  1. Gerald Ford's elevation to President of the United States after the resignation of Richard Nixon;
  2. The decline of the automobile industry tied to the 1973 oil crisis with layoffs of more than 200,000 automobile workers;
  3. The re-election of William Milliken as Governor of Michigan despite a general tide in favor of Democrats;
  4. The United States Supreme Court ruling in Milliken v. Bradley reversing a lower court order requiring cross-district busing of public school students among 53 school districts in metropolitan Detroit and instead directing the creation of a desegregation plan limited to the Detroit schools;
  5. Voters' repeal of the state sales tax on food and drugs;
  6. Gasoline shortage;
  7. Contaminated feed forces the slaughter of thousands of farm animals;
  8. Democrats take the Fifth and Eighth Congressional Districts and then hold them in post-Watergate elections resulting in Democrats taking control of the Michigan Legislature and the state's Congressional delegation;
  9. The worst snowstorm of the century hit southern Michigan; and
  10. Utilities suffered lower profit margins and were granted large rate increases.

The AP also selected the state's top sports stories of 1974 as follows:[2]

  1. Al Kaline's retiring after 21 years with 3,007 hits and 399 home runs;
  2. The 1974 Michigan Wolverines football team compiling a 10–0 record before losing to Ohio State on November 23;
  3. The death of Detroit Lions head coach Don McCafferty on July 28;
  4. The 1974 Michigan State Spartans football team compiling a 7–3–1 record and upsetting No. 1 ranked Ohio State on November 9;
  5. The 1974 Central Michigan Chippewas football team winning the NCAA Division II Football Championship;
  6. The 1973–74 Detroit Pistons compiling a 52–30, the best record in franchise history to that point;
  7. The rise and fall of the Detroit Wheels of the World Football League;
  8. The 1974 Detroit Lions compiling a 7–7 record under new head coach Rick Forzano;
  9. Hudson High School won the Class C state football championship and kept its winning streak alive; and
  10. John Hiller of the Detroit Tigers set an American League record with 17 wins as a relief pitcher and was named to the All-Star team.

The year's highlights in Michigan music included the releases of Stevie Wonder's Fulfillingness' First Finale which reached #1 and won the Grammy for Album of the Year, Grand Funk Railroad's Shinin' On album with the #1 hit The Loco-Motion, and Aretha Franklin's Let Me in Your Life album that reached #1 on Billboard's R&B albums chart.

Office holders[edit]

State office holders[edit]

Mayors of major cities[edit]

Federal office holders[edit]

Population[edit]

In the 1970 United States Census, Michigan was recorded as having a population of 8,875,083 persons, ranking as the seventh most populous state in the country. By 1980, the state's population had grown 4.4% to 9,262,078 persons.

Cities[edit]

The following is a list of cities in Michigan with a population of at least 70,000 based on 1970 U.S. Census data. Historic census data from 1960 and 1980 is included to reflect trends in population increases or decreases. Cities that are part of the Detroit metropolitan area are shaded in tan.

1970
Rank
City County 1960 Pop. 1970 Pop. 1980 Pop. Change 1970-80
1 Detroit Wayne 1,670,144 1,514,063 1,203,368 −20.5% Decrease
2 Grand Rapids Kent 177,313 197,649 181,843 −8.0% Decrease
3 Flint Genesee 196,940 193,317 159,611 −17.4% Decrease
4 Warren Macomb 89,246 179,260 161,134 −10.1% Decrease
5 Lansing Ingham 107,807 131,403 130,414 −0.8% Decrease
6 Livonia Wayne 66,702 110,109 104,814 −4.8% Decrease
7 Dearborn Wayne 112,007 104,199 90,660 −13.0% Decrease
8 Ann Arbor Washtenaw 67,340 100,035 107,969 7.9% Increase
9 Saginaw Saginaw 98,265 91,849 77,508 −15.6% Decrease
10 St. Clair Shores Macomb 76,657 88,093 76,210 −13.5% Decrease
11 Westland Wayne 60,743 86,749 84,603 −2.5% Decrease
12 Royal Oak Oakland 80,612 86,238 70,893 −17.8% Decrease
13 Kalamazoo Kalamazoo 82,089 85,555 79,722 −6.8% Decrease
14 Pontiac Oakland 82,233 85,279 76,715 −10.0% Decrease
15 Dearborn Heights Wayne 61,118 80,069 67,706 −15.4% Decrease
16 Taylor Wayne na 70,020 77,568 10.8% Increase

Counties[edit]

The following is a list of counties in Michigan with populations of at least 120,000 based on 1970 U.S. Census data. Historic census data from 1960 and 1980 are included to reflect trends in population increases or decreases. Counties that are part of the Detroit metropolitan area are shaded in tan.

1970
Rank
County Largest city 1960 Pop. 1970 Pop. 1980 Pop. Change 1970-80
1 Wayne Detroit 2,666,297 2,666,751 2,337,891 −12.3% Decrease
2 Oakland Pontiac 690,259 907,871 1,011,793 11.4% Increase
3 Macomb Warren 405,804 625,309 694,600 11.1% Increase
4 Genesee Flint 374,313 444,341 450,449 1.4% Increase
5 Kent Grand Rapids 363,187 411,044 444,506 8.1% Increase
6 Ingham Lansing 211,296 261,039 275,520 5.5% Increase
7 Washtenaw Ann Arbor 172,440 234,103 264,748 13.1% Increase
8 Saginaw Saginaw 190,752 219,743 228,059 3.8% Increase
9 Kalamazoo Kalamazoo 169,712 201,550 212,378 5.4% Increase
10 Berrien Benton Harbor 149,865 163,875 171,276 4.5% Increase
11 Muskegon Muskegon 129,943 157,426 157,589 0.1% Increase
12 Jackson Jackson 131,994 143,274 151,495 5.7% Increase
13 Calhoun Battle Creek 138,858 141,963 141,557 −0.3% Decrease
14 Ottawa Holland 98,719 128,181 157,174 22.6% Increase
15 St. Clair Port Huron 107,201 120,175 138,802 15.5% Increase
16 Monroe Monroe 101,120 118,479 134,659 13.7% Increase
17 Bay Bay City 107,042 117,339 119,881 2.2% Increase

Sports[edit]

Baseball[edit]

American football[edit]

Basketball[edit]

Ice hockey[edit]

Motor sports[edit]

Other[edit]

Music[edit]

Companies[edit]

The following is a list of major companies based in Michigan in 1974.

Company 1974
Rank[14]
1975
Rank[15]
Headquarters Core business
General Motors 1 2 Detroit Automobiles
Ford Motor Company 3 3 Dearborn Automobiles
Chrysler 4 11 Highland Park Automobiles
Dow Chemical Company 38 27 Midland Chemicals
Bendix Corporation 61 76 Southfield Automotive brakes, vacuum tubes, aeronautical hydraulics and electric power systems, avionics, fuel control systems, radios, televisions and computers
American Motors 88 93 Detroit Automobiles
Whirlpool Corporation 97 122 Benton Harbor Home appliances
Clark Equipment Company 149 148 Buchanan Industrial and construction machinery and equipment
Kellogg Co. 197 200 Battle Creek Cereal products
Gerber Products Company 461 -- Fremont Baby food
Burroughs Corporation Detroit Business equipment
National Bank of Detroit Detroit Banking
Detroit Edison Detroit Electric utility
Ex-Cell-O Troy Engine components, auto parts, machine tools
Masco Taylor Home improvement and construction products
S. S. Kresge Corporation Troy Kmart and Kresge retail stores
Monroe Auto Equipment Co. Monroe Auto parts
Upjohn Kalamazoo Pharmaceutical
Steelcase Grand Rapids Office, educational, and health care furniture
Consumers Power Jackson Natural gas utility
Michigan National Corp. Bloomfield Hills Banking
Amway Ada Consumer products, direct selling

Chronology of events[edit]

January[edit]

  • January 1 - Detroit began the new year with five homicides on New Year's Day.[16]
  • January 2 – Coleman Young was sworn in as the first black mayor of Detroit and warned criminals to "hit the road".[17]
  • January 9 – State Senator Charles N. Youngblood, Jr. resigned his Michigan Senate seat following his conviction for bribe conspiracy[18][19]
  • January 10 – Gov. William Milliken in his annual State of the State message called for $53 million in tax cuts[20]
  • January 14 – The Detroit Institute of Arts unveiled its recent acquisition, The Conversion of Magdalene by Caravaggio[21]
  • January 15 – The Teamsters began a strike at five supermarket chains representing 80% of the food sales in southeastern Michigan[22] The strike ended on January 28.[23]
  • January 16 – Two Detroit police officers were killed in a shootout with a tool and die worker in northeast Detroit[24]
  • January 24 - General Motors announced plans to layoff 75,000 hourly workers, 50,000 in Michigan, at 14 plants by March.[25]
  • January 30 – UAW President Leonard Woodcock called for a temporary curb on foreign automobile imports in the wake of high unemployment in the automobile industryl[26]
  • January 28-30 - Fort Street Union Depot in Detroit, built in 1891, was demolished.[27]
  • January 31 – General Motors announced record profits of $2.4 billion for 1973.[28]

February[edit]

  • February – Michigan's unemployment rate reaches 10.6%, the highest in the country with large layoffs in the automobile industry,[29] including almost 21,000 General Motors workers laid off in Flint alone.[30]
  • February 8 - Amid violence against independent truckers continuing to drive despite a truckers strike, Gov. Milliken ordered the Michigan National Guard placed on alert and doubled patrols by the Michigan State Police.[31]
  • February 9 - A foreman at Chrysler's Huber Avenue Foundry in Detroit died from multiple head injuries after being beaten by an auto worker in the plant's finishing room.[32]
  • February 13 – Detroit Mayor Coleman Young announced the abolition of the Detroit Police Department's controversial STRESS (Stop the Robberies and Enjoy Safe Streets) unit and plans to open 50 "mini-stations" and to increase the Department's black representation to 50% by 1977.[33] The STRESS unit had been accused of killing 22 residents and arresting hundreds more without cause during its two-and-a-half-year existence.[34]
  • February 15 – The Department of Housing and Urban Development announced a plan to sell 2,000 abandoned homes in Detroit to the city for sale to homesteaders at a price of not more than five dollars per house.[35]
  • February 18 – In a special election to fill Vice President Gerald Ford's Grand Rapids Congressional seat, Democrat Richard Vander Veen upset the Republican in what had long been a safe Republican seat.[36] The result was deemed to be a message that Watergate could lead to significant Republican losses in the fall.[37][38]
  • February 24 - Billie Jean King defeated Rosemary Casals in the singles of the 1974 Virginia Slims of Detroit at Cobo Arena. King and Casals teamed up to win the doubles.[39]

March[edit]

  • March 2 – Amid the gasoline shortage, a survey showed that 58% of the gas stations in the Detroit area were closed and only three percent of the open stations had gas to sell.[40]
  • March 4 – Signs were posted for Michigan's reduced 55 mile per hour speed limit on 1,550 miles of the state's freeways.[41]
  • March 6 – The EPA, in its second ever recall order, directed Chrysler to recall 826,000 vehicles to replace temperature sensors in 1973 automobiles.[42]
  • March 7 – William Milliken announced that he would run for a second four-year term as Governor of Michigan.[43]
  • March 7 – Hundreds of streakers exposed themselves as part of the growing fad.[44] Five days later, another 60 streakers participated in the "First Annual Streak In" on the Diag at the University of Michigan, and four streakers stopped traffic on State Street in Ann Arbor.[45] Ray Stevens' song The Streak was released later in the month.
  • March 13 – The Execution of Private Slovik, a television film based on the life of Detroit resident Eddie Slovik who was the only soldier executed for desertion in World War II, aired on ABC.[46]
  • March 16 – Harvey Leach, chairman of the Joshua Doore furniture company, was killed and found in the trunk of a Lincoln Continental; the crime was considered to be a professional hit. Five months later, a controlling interest in the company was acquired by a firm owned in part by an associate of Mafia boss Anthony Giacolone.[47]
  • March 27 – Former Detroit Mayor Jerome Cavanagh announced at a press conference that he was calling off his campaign for governor after learning he would be required to undergo surgery to remove a kidney on which a malignant tumor had been discovered.[48] He later re-entered the race but lost the Democratic nomination to Sander Levin.

April[edit]

  • April 1 – Voters in Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti passed amendments to their city charters reducing the penalty for possession or use of marijuana to a fine of five dollars.[49]
  • April 4 – In the 1974 Tornado Super Outbreak that left 320 dead from Alabama to Canada, three persons in Michigan.[50]
  • April 10 – President Nixon appeared in Michigan's Thumb to campaign for James Sparling in Michigan's 8th Congressional District[51] One week later, Sparling lost to J. Bob Traxler, the first Democrat to win the District since 1932.[52]
  • April 18 – The U.S Navy suspended Project Sanguine (later known as Seafarer), a proposed extremely low frequency (ELF) radio antenna intended to cover up to 3,000 square miles of the Upper Peninsula.[53]
  • April 26 – General Motors announced that its first quarter profits were down 85% for the company's worst showing since 1948.[54]
  • April 29 – Chrysler announced that its first quarter profits were down 98%.[55]

May[edit]

  • May 5 - The Detroit Free Press reported that Detroit experienced 89 homicides in April, the highest monthly total in city history.[56]
  • May 5 - Television newsman Bill Bonds was arrested for drunk driving in West Bloomfield.[57] He pleaded guilty to driving while visibly impaired in October.[58]
  • May 10 - Two Teamsters locals at the Stroh Brewery approved a new contract, ending a 40-day strike at the Detroit brewery.[59]
  • May 28 - In a growing scandal arising out of cattle feed from the Farm Bureau Service found to be contaminated with the flamer retardant PBB, five more herds of cattle were found to be contaminated.[60] The Public Health Department warned on May 29 that contaminated milk and dairy products from the cows had been distributed statewide and could cause cancer.[61] By May 30, state officials were developing plans to destroy 115,000 chickens, 3,000 cows, and 150 pigs exposed to the contaminated feed.[62][63]

June[edit]

  • June - The Michigan Institute of Improved Sexual Response in Detroit offered weekly sessions, including sexual intercourse with surrogates, to treat sex problems. City and county officials were investigating the clinic's legality.[64]
  • June 16 - Richard Petty won the Michigan 400 before a crowd of 51,500 at Michigan International Speedway.[5] The race was reduced by ten percent to 360 miles due to the energy crisis.[65]
  • June 24 - The Michigan House of Representatives began an investigation into payments totaling more than $70,000 to Rep. John Smeekens.[66] On August 8, the special panel investigating Smeekens recommended that he be censured for being an expense account cheat.[67] The censure was approved on September 19.[68]

July[edit]

  • July 1 - Detroit became the largest city in the United States to adopt a provision in its city charter banning discrimination against homosexuals in employment, housing, and public accommodations.[69][70]
  • July 3 - Gordie Howe and his family were presented with the Freedom Award as part of the annual Detroit-Windsor International Freedom Festival.[71]
  • July 9 - Jac LeGoff, anchorman on Detroit's CBS affiliate (WJBK) since 1962, signed a 10-year contract with the city's ABC affiliate WXYZ at $100,000 a year.[72]
  • July 9 - Unemployment figures for June showed a 70,000 person increase in unemployment with the state's unemployment rate climbing to 10.9%.[73]
  • July 19 – A federal judge in Washington, D.C., upheld a presidential ban on Jimmy Hoffa's participation in union affairs until 1980.[74]
  • July 21 - Bobby Unser won the Michigan 200 automobile race in front of 46,180 spectators at Michigan International Speedway[7]
  • July 22 - In the 50th Port Huron to Mackinac Boat Race, the "Dora IV", a 61-foot customed cutter captained by Lynn Williams of Chicago, was the overall winner, completing the race in 51 hours and 22 minutes, corrected to 49 hours, 20 minutes with its handicap.[8]
  • July 25 – The United States Supreme Court ruled in Milliken v. Bradley reversed a lower court order requiring cross-district busing of public school students among 53 school districts in metropolitan Detroit and instead directed the creation of a desegregation plan limited to the Detroit schools.[75]
  • July 28 – Detroit Lions head coach Don McCafferty died of a heart attack while mowing the lawn at his home in West Bloomfield.[76]
  • July 30 – A station wagon filled with four women, one of whom was pregnant, and four children returning from picking blueberries was struck by a Soo Line freight train in the Upper Peninsula 25 miles southwest of Sault Ste. Marie; only one person survived.[77]

August[edit]

  • August 5 – U. S. Senate Republican Whip Robert P. Griffin of Michigan held a press conference in which he stated that the national interest and President Nixon's interest would be served by Nixon's resigning.[78]
  • August 6 – With 61% of the votes in the Democratic primary, Sander Levin won the Democratic nomination for governor.[79]
  • August 9 – Gerald Ford of Michigan was sworn in as the 38th President of the United States and declared "our long national nightmare is over".[80]
  • August 12 – President Ford announced that his first priority was a fight against inflation and criticized General Motors for its plan for substantial price increases on 1975 models.[81][82] Ten days later, General Motors agreed to a partial rollback of its price increases.[83]

September[edit]

  • September 7 – Members of the United Steel Workers voted to end a 25-week strike against Dow Chemical Co. in Midland. The strike was the longest in the company's history.[84]
  • September 24 - Al Kaline of the Detroit Tigers became the 13th member of baseball's 3,000 hit club with a stand-up double off Dave McNally.[85]
  • September 30 - General Motors named Thomas Murphy as its new chairman and CEO, effective December 1. Pete Estes was named president.[86]

October[edit]

  • October 3 - The federal government gave Detroit $8.7 million to create 700 jobs for persons unemployed or underemployed.[87]
  • October 4 - A federal bankruptcy judge granted the World Football League permission to find a buyer for the Detroit Wheels after the team filed for bankruptcy.[88]
  • October 4 - A gambling raid in northeast Detroit resulted in 98 arrests in the city's largest crackdown on gambling since 1968.[89]
  • October 10 - Four gunmen held the family of Ypsilanti bank manager Richard Green at gunpoint, forcing him to rob his own bank of $35,000 as ransom.[90]
  • October 13 - A nationwide survey conducted by the University of Michigan found consumer sentiment about the economy to be at its lowest point in 25 years with conditions that "might make for a real recession".[91]
  • October 20 - Altie Taylor scored two touchdowns, and Errol Mann kicked two field goals, as the Detroit Lions ended a 13-game losing streak against the Minnesota Vikings with a 20-16 victory in Minneapolis.[92]
  • October 23 - Chrysler announced that it had sustained an $8 million loss in the third quarter.[93]
  • October 25 - General Motors announced that its third quarter profits were down 94% from $267 million in 1973 to $16 million.[94]
  • October 25 - The City of Detroit settled a racial discrimination lawsuit against the Detroit Boat Club and Detroit Yacht Club, both of which leased space on Belle Isle from the city; the settlement required both clubs to admit additional black members within 90 days.[95]

November[edit]

  • November 2 - UAW vice president and civil rights leader Nelson "Jack" Edwards was killed by a stray bullet in a Detroit bar.[96]
  • November 3 - Dearborn Mayor and segregationist Orville L. Hubbard suffered a stroke and underwent brain surgery the following day.[97] Officially, Hubbard remained mayor until 1978, but the City Council president served as mayor pro tem, running the city on a day-to-day basis, for the rest of Hubbard's final term.
  • November 5
  • William Milliken was re-elected as Governor with 51.07% of the vote over Sander Levin who garnered 46.75% of the vote and Zolton Ferency who garnered 1.08% of the vote.
  • In elections for the U. S. House of Representatives, Democrats gained ground. Democrat James Blanchard (59.0%) unseated Republican incumbent Robert J. Huber (40.4%). Democrat Milton Robert Carr also won in a previously Republican district. Democrat William M. Brodhead won the seat previously held by Martha Griffiths. Donald W. Riegle Jr. was reelected after changing his party affiliation from Republican to Democrat. Democrats Richard Vander Veen and J. Bob Traxler were reelected in historically Republican district which they had won earlier in the year in special elections.
  • Attorney General Frank J. Kelley (D) and Secretary of State Richard H. Austin (D) were reelected by two-to-one margins.[98]
  • The Democratic Party also won control over the Michigan legislature for the first time since the early 1960s, winning control of the Senate and retaining control of the House of Representatives.[99]
  • Proposition C, a statewide ballot initiative to repeal the state sales tax on food and drugs, was approved by a margin of 56% to 44%.[100]
  • November 9 - The Michigan State Spartans football team upset Ohio State (ranked No. 1 in the AP Poll) by a score of 16 to 13 in East Lansing. The Spartans held Ohio State at its own one-yard line as the game ended.[101]
  • November 19 - Chrysler announced plans to close four of its five automobile assembly plants due to slow sales of its automobiles.[102]
  • November 21 - Ford Motor announced that it was indefinitely laying off 3,000 white collar workers.[103]
  • November 22 - Ford Motor announced that it would temporarily lay off an additional 35,000 workers as part of a December production cut back. Ford's announcement raised the total planned layoffs in the automobile industry to more than 200,000 workers.[104]
  • November 23 - The undefeated Michigan Wolverines football team (ranked No. 2 in the UPI Poll) lost to Ohio State (ranked No. 3 in the UPI Poll) by a score of 12 to 10. With 18 second remaining, Michigan kicker Mike Lantry attempted a 33-yard field goal which was called wide left by the officials.[105]
  • November 27 - Ford Motor announced plans to lay off an addition 7,950 workers, 2,300 of them indefinitely.[106]
  • November 28 - An estimated 500,000 persons lined the route of the Hudson's Thanksgiving Day Parade along Woodward Avenue in Detroit.[107]
  • November 29 - General Motors announced plans to place an additional 24,000 hourly workers on indefinite layoff in January. The decision brought the total of General Motors layoffs to 41,000.[108]

December[edit]

  • December 1–2 - A snowstorm dropped 18.9 inches of snow on metropolitan Detroit in a 24-hour period. The snowfall was the most in the area since 1886 and resulted in 32 deaths from heart attacks to persons shoveling snow or pushing automobiles.[109][110]
  • December 12 - At an automobile industry summit meeting, President Ford pledged support for measures to increase automobile sales, including a freeze on new anti-pollution and safety regulations, a tax cut, and rebates for new car buyers.[111]
  • December 14 - The 1974 Central Michigan Chippewas football team defeated Delaware in the Camellia Bowl to win the NCAA Division II football championship.
  • December 16 - American Motors announced plans to lay off 15,150 workers in January.[112]
  • December 18 - General Motors announced additional layoffs, increasing to 132,000 the number of the company's hourly workers to be laid off in the first quarter of 1975.[113]
  • December 19 - Ford Motor announced additional layoff, increasing to 90,00 the number of its hourly workers to be laid off in the first quarter of 1975.[114]
  • December 20 - The Pontiac City Commission voted to approve a $7.1 million loan to allow a roof to be added to a stadium (the Pontiac Silverdome) planned for the city to host Detroit Lions games starting in 1975.[115]
  • December 23 - The Detroit Housing and Urban Development office announced plans to increase demolition of homes in Detroit. It was estimated that 500 HUD houses were being abandoned each month in Detroit.[116]

Undated[edit]

Births[edit]

Conn Smythe winner Tim Thomas
Musician and singer Uncle Cracker

Gallery of 1974 births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

Myrtle Craig Mowbray, first African-American female graduate of MSU
Detroit native Charles Lindbergh
  • January 6 - Rev. William Foley, former athletic director at the University of Detroit, in Clarkston at age 96[117]
  • January 7 - Sam "Singing Sam" Bolgona, tenor and restaurant operator who for 45 years entertained patrons by singing Italian opera[118]
  • January 8 - Kreigh Collins, creator of the comic strips "Kevin the Bold" and "Up Anchor", in Grand Rapids at age 66[119]
  • January 12 - John Elias, co-founder of the Elias Brothers Big Boy restaurants, the largest restaurant chain in Michigan, at age 54[120]
  • January 14 - Wilbur M. Cunningham, American football player and coach, attorney, historian and author, in Benton Harbor at age 87
  • January 16 - Roy Bargy, composer and pianist, in Vista, CA, at age 79
  • January 17 - Arthur Radebaugh, futurist, illustrator, airbrush artist, and industrial designer, in Grand Rapids at age 67
  • February 14 - Frank "Bullet" Miller, baseball pitcher, in Allegan at age 87
  • February 15 - Maurice Sugar, pioneer labor lawyer, general counsel to UAW (1937-1948), at his home on Black Lake at age 81[121]
  • February 17 - Ralph W. Gerard, neurophysiologist and behavioral scientist, at age 73
  • March 9 - Felix Schlag, sculptor and designer of the U.S. five cent coin in use from 1938-2004), in Owosso at age 82[122]
  • March 16 - Daniel Frank Gerber, who built baby food manufacturer Gerber Products Co. into a Fortune 500 company, at Gerber Memorial Hospital in Fremont, Michigan, at age 73[123]
  • March 22 - Sam Donahue, swing musician, at age 56[124]
  • March 31 - Dirk Gringhuis, artist and illustrator, at age 55[125]
  • April 3 - Marston Bates, biologist and leading expert on mosquitoes, malaria, and yellow fever, in Ann Arbor at age 67[126]
  • April 4 - Leland I. Doan, former president of Dow Chemical Co., in Midland at age 79[127]
  • May 7 - Hobart Hurd Willard, analytical chemist and inorganic chemist, in Ann Arbor at age 92[128]
  • May 16 - William Hayes, burlesque actor, in Detroit at age 81[129]
  • May 24 - Clyde Cowan, physicist and co-discoverer of the neutrino, in Bethesda, MD, at age 54[130]
  • June 30 - Tony Fontane, gospel singer, in California at age 48
  • July 10 – Stephen John Roth, U.S. District Court Judge who ordered cross-district busing in metropolitan Detroit, in Flint at age 66[131]
  • July 24 - Carl E. Guthe, academic, anthropologist, and dean, at age 81
  • July 27 - Blues musician Lightnin' Slim in Detroit
  • July 28 – Don McCafferty, head coach of the Detroit Lions, in Pontiac at age 53[76]
  • June 30 - Gene Gazlay, director of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, from a heart attack at Groesbeck Golf Course in Lansing, at age 50[132]
  • August 19 - Augie Bergamo, baseball player, in Grosse Pointe at age 56[133]
  • August 26 – Charles Lindbergh, aviator and Detroit native, in Hawaii at age 72[134]
  • September 15 - John Challis, builder of harpsichords and clavichords, at age 67
  • September 29 - Van Patrick, sportscast who did play-by-play for Detroit Tigers and Detroit Lions, in South Bend, IN, at age 58[135]
  • September 29 - Herbert C. Holdridge, U.S. Army brigadier general, in Toledo
  • October 5 - Robert G. Robinson, the first aviator to receive the Medal of Honor, for his service in World War I, in St. Ignace at age 80[136]
  • October 13 - Otto Binder, comic book author (including Captain Marvel), in Chestertown, NY, at age 63
  • October 18 - Tate Houston, jazz saxophonist, at age 49
  • October 21 - Donald Goines, novelist (including the Kenyatta series), in Detroit at age 37
  • October 27 - Jay Datus, artist known primarily for his mural painting in Arizona[137]
  • November 2 - Nelson "Jack" Edwards, UAW vice president and civil rights leader, in Detroit at age 57[96]
  • November 15 - Nathaniel B. Wales, inventor credited with inventing the Kelvinator refrigerator and early patents on washers, vacuum cleaners, and a proximity detonator for bombs[138]
  • November 15 - Myrtle Craig Mowbray, first African American woman to graduate from Michigan Agricultural College
  • November 23 - Jerry Benjamin, baseball outfielder (3x Negro League All-Star), in Detroit at age 65
  • December 19 - Russell D. Oliver, American football player, in South Bend, IN
  • December 23 - John Hiemenga, first president of Calvin College
  • December 25 - Frederick L. Conklin, American football player, doctor, and Navy officer, in San Diego, CA, at age 86
  • December 31 - Former Lieutenant Governor George W. Welsh

Gallery of 1974 deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Big News of '74: Ford State's Top Story". The News-Palladium. December 31, 1974. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  2. ^ "Al Kaline's Retirement Top Sports Story In Michigan". The News-Palladium. December 30, 1974. p. 26 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ "2012 University of Michigan Baseball Record Book" (PDF). University of Michigan. 2012. pp. 22, 71. Retrieved August 9, 2017.
  4. ^ 2012 Record Book, p. 13.
  5. ^ a b "51,500 See Richard Petty Win at MIS". Detroit Free Press. June 17, 1974. p. 1D.
  6. ^ "Miss Bud Still King of Boats". Detroit Free Press. July 1, 1974. p. 1D.
  7. ^ a b "Bobby Unser, Foyt Win at MIS". Detroit Free Press. July 22, 1974. p. 1D.
  8. ^ a b "Cutter Dora IV declared overall Mackinac winner". The Times Herald (Port Huron, MI). July 23, 1974. p. 1.
  9. ^ "Big Stevie Wonder Overcomes Olympia Sound Trap in a Visit Home". Detroit Free Press. September 29, 1974. p. 8C – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ "17,000 Fans All Shook Up By Elvis". Detroit Free Press. September 30, 1974. p. 3A.
  11. ^ "Alice Is Straight, Under the Glitter". Detroit Free Press. October 7, 1974. p. 3A.
  12. ^ "Booming, Blasting BTO Just What the Fans Want". Detroit Free Press. October 13, 1974. p. 11D.
  13. ^ "Onstage Is Like Christmas for Elton". Detroit Free Press. November 14, 1974. p. 12D.
  14. ^ "Fortune 500 1974". Fortune. Retrieved May 18, 2017.(1974 ranking based on 1973 performance)
  15. ^ "Fortune 500 1975". Fortune. Retrieved May 18, 2017.(1975 ranking based on 1974 performance)
  16. ^ "Detroit Begins the New Year With Five Killings". Detroit Free Press. January 2, 1974. p. 3A – via Newspapers.com.
  17. ^ "Mayor's Inaugural Speech; Young Warns Criminals: 'Hit the Road'". Detroit Free Press. January 3, 1974. p. 1.
  18. ^ "Youngblood Resigns Senate Seat". Detroit Free Press. January 10, 1974. p. 1.
  19. ^ "Youngblood Offers His Resignation". Lansing State Journal. January 9, 1974. p. 1.
  20. ^ "State of State Message: Cut Taxes $53 Million -- Milliken". Detroit Free Press. January 11, 1974. p. 1.
  21. ^ "Lost Masterpiece, Now Ours, Unveiled at Institute of Arts". Detroit Free Press. January 15, 1974. p. 1.
  22. ^ "Teamsters Launch Walkout At Five Supermarket Chains". Detroit Free Press. January 16, 1974. p. 1.
  23. ^ "Grocery Deliveries Resume As Teamsters Accept Pact". Detroit Free Press. January 29, 1974. p. 1.
  24. ^ "2 Police Officers Slain in Gun Battle". Detroit Free Press. January 16, 1974. p. 1.
  25. ^ "GM Idles 75,000 at 14 Plants". Detroit Free Press. January 25, 1974. p. 3A.
  26. ^ "Woodcock Asks Curb On Imports Of Autos". Detroit Free Press. January 31, 1974. p. 1.
  27. ^ "Another Landmark To Fall". Detroit Free Press. January 26, 1974. p. 3A – via Newspapers.com.
  28. ^ "GM Profits Set Record". Detroit Free Press. February 1, 1974. p. 1.
  29. ^ "Jobless Rate Tops 10 Pct. in State; Highest in Nation". Detroit Free Press. March 9, 1974. p. 1.
  30. ^ "Flint Fights Off Gloom As Auto Layoffs Climb". Detroit Free Press. February 10, 1974. p. 1.
  31. ^ "State Guard Alerted". Lansing State Journal. February 9, 1974. p. 1.
  32. ^ "Foreman Dies After Beating by Auto Worker". Detroit Free Press. February 10, 1974. p. 3A.
  33. ^ "Mayor Abolishes STRESS, Plans Police Mini-Stations". Detroit Free Press. February 14, 1974. p. 1.
  34. ^ "Coleman A. Young, 79, Mayor of Detroit And Political Symbol for Blacks, Is Dead". The New York Times. November 30, 1997.
  35. ^ "HUD Offers $1 Houses For City Homesteaders". Detroit Free Press. February 16, 1974. p. 1.
  36. ^ "Democrat VanderVeen Wins Ford's Old Seat". Lansing State Journal. February 19, 1974. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  37. ^ "State GOP Sees Dem Victory As Bad Omen". Detroit Free Press. February 20, 1974. p. 1.
  38. ^ "State GOP Voters Bolted Over Watergate, Poll Says". Detroit Free Press. March 1, 1974. p. 1.
  39. ^ "9,123 See Billie Jean Win 'Slims' Title". Detroit Free Press. February 25, 1974. p. 1D.
  40. ^ "Only 3 in 100 Gas Stations Open Today". Detroit Free Press. March 3, 1974. p. 3A.
  41. ^ "55 m.p.h. Signs Will Go Up Monday". Detroit Free Press. March 3, 1974. p. 3A.
  42. ^ "Chrysler to Recall 826,000 Cars". Detroit Free Press. March 7, 1974. p. 3A.
  43. ^ "Milliken Announces He'll Run Again". Detroit Free Press. March 8, 1974. p. 3A.
  44. ^ "Michigan Streakers Covering Up?". Detroit Free Press. March 9, 1974. p. 3A.
  45. ^ "Naked Came the Streaker -- At Last -- to Chilly U-M". Detroit Free Press. March 13, 1974. p. 3A.
  46. ^ "War Hero Haunts Family, Friends". Detroit Free Press. March 17, 1974. p. 1.
  47. ^ "Joshua Doore Control Sold To 2 Southfield Attorneys; Mafia Chief, Buyer Linked". Detroit Free Press. August 14, 1974. p. 1.
  48. ^ "Cavanagh Closes Campaign Because of a Kidney Tumor". Detroit Free Press. March 28, 1974. p. 1.
  49. ^ "2 Cities OK $5 Fine for Using Pot". Detroit Free Press. April 2, 1974. p. 1.
  50. ^ "Twister Death Toll Rising". Detroit Free Press. April 5, 1974. p. 1.
  51. ^ "Nixon Visit to Thumb Lifts GOP Hopes". Detroit Free Press. April 11, 1974. p. 1.
  52. ^ "Nixon Key Issue in GOP Defeat". Detroit Free Press. April 18, 1974. p. 1.
  53. ^ "Navy Suspends Vast UP Project". Detroit Free Press. April 19, 1974. p. 1.
  54. ^ "GM Profits Plunge 85 Pct". Detroit Free Press. April 27, 1974. p. 1.
  55. ^ "Chrysler Profits Sag 98%; Car, Truck Prices Boosted". Detroit Free Press. April 30, 1974. p. 1.
  56. ^ "Bloody April". Detroit Free Press. May 5, 1974. p. 3A.
  57. ^ "Bill Bonds Arrested For Drunk Driving". Detroit Free Press. May 7, 1974. p. 3A – via Newspapers.com.
  58. ^ "Bill Bonds Guilty on Drinking Count". Detroit Free Press. October 9, 1974. p. 3A.
  59. ^ "Three-Year Pact OKd At Stroh's". Detroit Free Press. May 11, 1974. p. 3A – via Newspapers.com.
  60. ^ "More Herds Contaminated". Detroit Free Press. May 29, 1974. pp. 3A, 8A – via Newspapers.com.
  61. ^ "State Probes Tainted Food". Detroit Free Press. May 30, 1974. p. 3A – via Newspapers.com.
  62. ^ "Mass Burial of Tainted Livestock Due". Detroit Free Press. May 31, 1974. p. 3A – via Newspapers.com.
  63. ^ "Review of Tainted Feed Case Set". Detroit Free Press. June 3, 1974. p. 3A – via Newspapers.com.
  64. ^ "Sex Clinic Offers Therapy Partners". Detroit Free Press. June 24, 1974. p. 3A – via Newspapers.com.
  65. ^ "MIS Cuts Race by 40 Miles". Detroit Free Press. June 15, 1974. p. 1D.
  66. ^ "Committee Will Probe Smeekens' Conduct". Detroit Free Press. June 25, 1974. p. 3A – via Newspapers.com.
  67. ^ "Censure ruled for Smeekens". Port Huron Times Herald. August 9, 1974. p. 5C.
  68. ^ "House approves Smeekens censure". Battle Creek Enquirer and News. September 20, 1974. p. 1A.
  69. ^ "New Charter Protects Homosexuals". Detroit Free Press. June 23, 1974. p. 3A – via Newspapers.com.
  70. ^ "Detroit's New City Charter Goes into Operation Today". Detroit Free Press. July 1, 1974. p. 3A – via Newspapers.com.
  71. ^ "It's the Freedom Award for the Howe Family". Detroit Free Press. July 4, 1974. p. 3A – via Newspapers.com.
  72. ^ "Jac LeGoff Going to Channel 7". Detroit Free Press. July 10, 1974. p. 3A – via Newspapers.com.
  73. ^ "State Jobless Rate Hits 10.9%". Detroit Free Press. July 10, 1974. p. 3A – via Newspapers.com.
  74. ^ "Hoffa's Union Ban Upheld". Detroit Free Press. July 20, 1974. p. 1.
  75. ^ "High Court Kill Cross-District Busing". Detroit Free Press. July 26, 1974. p. 1.
  76. ^ a b "Lions Coach McCafferty Dies". Detroit Free Press. July 29, 1974. pp. 1A, 5A – via Newspapers.com.
  77. ^ "7 Killed as Train Hits Car At an Unguarded Crossing". Detroit Free Press. July 31, 1974. p. 1.
  78. ^ "Griffin Urges Nixon To Quit". Detroit Free Press. August 6, 1974. p. 1.
  79. ^ "Levin Gains Clout From Win -- And Money, Too, He Hopes". Detroit Free Press. August 8, 1974. p. 2.
  80. ^ "President Ford: 'Nightmare Is Over'". Detroit Free Press. August 10, 1974. p. 1.
  81. ^ "President Criticizes GM for Big Price Hike". Detroit Free Press. August 13, 1974. p. 1.
  82. ^ "Ford Places First Priority On Fight Against Inflation". Detroit Free Press. August 13, 1974. p. 1.
  83. ^ "President Gets GM To Soften Price Hike". Detroit Free Press. August 22, 1974. p. 1.
  84. ^ "Long, Bitter Strike Ends at Midland Dow". Detroit Free Press. September 8, 1974. p. 1.
  85. ^ "He Did It! Kaline Joins Greats With 3,000th Hit". Detroit Free Press. September 25, 1974. p. 1D.
  86. ^ "GM Picks Murphy and Estes". Detroit Free Press. October 1, 1974. p. 1.
  87. ^ "City's Needy to Get 700 Jobs". Detroit Free Press. October 4, 1974. p. 3A.
  88. ^ "Judge OKs Sale of Wheels". Detroit Free Press. October 5, 1974. p. 3A.
  89. ^ "Huge Gambling Raid Brings 98 Arrests". Detroit Free Press. October 6, 1974. p. 1.
  90. ^ "4 Robbers Hold Family Overnight". Detroit Free Press. October 11, 1974. p. 1.
  91. ^ "Public Sees Long Recession". Detroit Free Press. October 14, 1974. p. 1.
  92. ^ "Worm Turns . . . Lions Finally Beats Vikes, 20-16". Detroit Free Press. October 21, 1974. p. 1D.
  93. ^ "Quarterly Loss $8 Million: Chrysler Profits Plunge". Detroit Free Press. October 23, 1974. p. 1.
  94. ^ "GM Earnings Plummet 94 Percent for Quarter". Detroit Free Press. October 26, 1974. p. 1.
  95. ^ "Boat Clubs Settle Race Dispute with City". Detroit Free Press. October 26, 1974. p. 3A.
  96. ^ a b "UAW's Nelson Jack Edwards Is Killed by Gunman in Bar". Detroit Free Press. November 3, 1974. pp. 1A, 9A – via Newspapers.com.
  97. ^ "Hubbard Is in Serious Condition". Detroit Free Press. November 5, 1974. p. 3A.
  98. ^ "Kelley, Austin Pace Dem Victory". Detroit Free Press. November 6, 1974. p. 3A.
  99. ^ "Dems Control Legislature For First Time in Decade". Detroit Free Press. November 6, 1974. p. 3A.
  100. ^ "Food Tax Repeal To Save Shoppers Half-Month's Bill". Detroit Free Press. November 7, 1974. p. 4A – via Newspapers.com.
  101. ^ "MSU Pulls Upset of Season". Detroit Free Press. November 10, 1974. p. 1.
  102. ^ "Chrysler Planning to Close 5 of 6 Car Assembly Plants". Detroit Free Press. November 20, 1974. p. 1.
  103. ^ "Ford to Lay Off 3,000 Of White-Collar Staff". Detroit Free Press. November 22, 1974. p. 1.
  104. ^ "Ford to Idle Another 35,000: Layoffs Top 200,000". Detroit Free Press. November 23, 1974. p. 1.
  105. ^ Cooper Rollow (November 24, 1973). "Ohio State boots Michigan: Bowl ballot needed after 12-10 victory". Chicago Tribune. p. 3-1.
  106. ^ "Ford to Idle 7,950 More; Most in Area". Detroit Free Press. November 28, 1974. p. 3A.
  107. ^ "Parade Puts Joy In City Of Gloom". Detroit Free Press. November 29, 1974. pp. 1A, 15A.
  108. ^ "New Production Cubacks: GM to Lay Off 24,000; 41,000 to Be Idle in Jan". Detroit Free Press. November 30, 1974. p. 3A.
  109. ^ "27 Die in Snow; Thousands Stranded; Storm Is The Worst Since 1886". Detroit Free Press. December 3, 1974. p. 1.
  110. ^ "Area Shakes Off Storm; Snow Deaths Rise to 32". Detroit Free Press. December 4, 1974. p. 1.
  111. ^ "President Weighs Tax Cut, Rebate Plan for Car Buyers". Detroit Free Press. December 13, 1974. p. 1.
  112. ^ "AMC Sets Layoffs For 15,150 In January". Detroit Free Press. December 17, 1974. p. 3A.
  113. ^ "GM Layoffs to Top 132,000 In New Production Cutbacks". Detroit Free Press. December 19, 1974. p. 1.
  114. ^ "Ford Co. Layoffs To Hit 90,000". Detroit Free Press. December 20, 1974. p. 1.
  115. ^ "Pontiac Adds Roof To Stadium". Detroit Free Press. December 21, 1974. p. 1.
  116. ^ "HUD to Step Up Demolition Of Battered Detroit Homes". Detroit Free Press. December 24, 1974. p. 3A.
  117. ^ "Rev. William Foley of U-D and Gesu Dies at 96". Detroit Free Press. January 7, 1974. p. 6C – via Newspapers.com.
  118. ^ "Tenor Sam Bologna Dead at 84". Detroit Free Press. January 8, 1974. pp. 3A, 10A.
  119. ^ "Kreigh Collins". The Sheboygan Press. January 10, 1974. p. 14.
  120. ^ "John Elias Dies, Co-Founder of Big Boy Chain". Detroit Free Press. January 13, 1974. p. 12B – via Newspapers.com.
  121. ^ "Pioneer Labor Lawyer Dies". Detroit Free Press. February 16, 1974. p. 6B – via Newspapers.com.
  122. ^ "Owosso Sculptor Who Put Jefferson On Nickel Dies". Detroit Free Press. March 10, 1974. p. 12A – via Newspapers.com.
  123. ^ "Baby Food Pioneer Dan Gerber Dies". Detroit Free Press. March 18, 1974. p. 3A – via Newspapers.com.
  124. ^ "Bandman Donahue dies at age 56". Reno Gazette-Journal. March 23, 1974. p. 2 – via Newspapers.com.
  125. ^ "Dirk Gringhuis, MSU Curator, Dies". Lansing State Journal. April 1, 1974. p. B2.
  126. ^ "Author and Scientist Marston Bates Dies". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. April 5, 1974. p. 4B – via Newspapers.com.
  127. ^ "Former Dow Head, L. I. Doan, Dies". Detroit Free Press. April 5, 1974. p. 14C – via Newspapers.com.
  128. ^ "Famed Chemist H. H. Willard Dies". Detroit Free Press. May 9, 1974. p. 6B – via Newspapers.com.
  129. ^ "William Hayes Buried: Burlesque Fans Were His Family". Detroit Free Press. May 29, 1974. pp. 3A, 8A – via Newspapers.com.
  130. ^ "Pioneering Physicist Clyde Cowan Dies". Albuquerque Journal. May 26, 1974. p. E12 – via Newspapers.com.
  131. ^ "Judge Stephen Roth Dead at 66". The News-Palladium. July 12, 1974. p. 15 – via Newspapers.com.
  132. ^ "DNR Director Gene Gazlay Dies". Detroit Free Press. July 1, 1974. p. 3A – via Newspapers.com.
  133. ^ "Ex-Cardinal Is Dead at 56". Detroit Free Press. August 20, 1974. p. 3D – via Newspapers.com.
  134. ^ "Air Pioneer Lindbergh Dies". Detroit Free Press. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  135. ^ "Sportscaster Van Patrick Dies". Detroit Free Press. p. 1A – via Newspapers.com.
  136. ^ "First Honor Medal Winner Dies After Secluded Years". Panama City (FL) News-Herald. October 11, 1974. p. 15 – via Newspapers.com.
  137. ^ "Muralist Jay Datus dies; founder of Kachina school". The Arizona Republic. October 29, 1974. p. C5 – via Newspapers.com.
  138. ^ "Inventor N. B. Wales Dies at 91". Detroit Free Press. November 19, 1974. p. 6C – via Newspapers.com.