1987 in Michigan

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Events from the year 1987 in Michigan.

Top Michigan news stories[edit]

The Associated Press (AP) selected the top stories in Michigan for 1987 as follows:[1]

  1. The August 16 crash of Northwest Airlines Flight 255 on takeoff from Detroit, killing 154 of 155 persons on board and two persons on the ground. The crash was the second deadliest in US history to that date. The sole survivor was a child, Cecilia Cichan.[2]
  2. Pope John Paul II's visit to the Detroit area on September 18 and 19, including appearances in Hamtramck and Hart Plaza and a mass at the Pontiac Silverdome.[3]
  3. The July 10 murder of three Inkster police officers while serving a bad check warrant at the Bungalow Motel.[4]
  4. Three-year labor agreements between the United Auto Workers and Ford and GM with provisions for job protection.
  5. The Michigan Legislature voted to increase of the state speed limit to 65 miles per hour on 720 miles of rural highway.
  6. The Michigan Legislature voted to prohibit the use of state funds for abortions.
  7. The March 4 death of nine persons in the crash of a Northwest Metrolink plane at Detroit Metro Airport.
  8. The death of Henry Ford II on September 29 at age 70.
  9. The August merger of Chrysler and American Motors Corporation.
  10. The October deaths of three Milford firefighters in a training accident.

The AP also separately suggested the state's top sports stories as follows:[5]

  1. The 1987 Detroit Tigers season in which the team finished with a Major League-best record of 98-64 and won the American League East.
  2. The 1987 Michigan State Spartans football team compiled a 9–2–1, won the Big Ten championship, and defeated USC in the Rose Bowl.
  3. The 1986–87 Detroit Pistons season, known as the "Bad Boys" because of their physical style of play, compiled a 52–30 record and took the Boston Celtics to seven games in the Eastern Conference finals.
  4. The 1986–87 Detroit Red Wings season in which the team, led by Steve Yzerman, compiled a 34–36–10 record, swept the Chicago Blackhawks in four games in the opening round of the playoffs, rallied from a 3-1 deficit against the Toronto Maple Leafs in the division final, before losing to the Edmonton Oilers in five games in the conference final.
  5. Alan Trammell hit for a .343 batting average and finished second in voting for the American League Most Valuable Player award.
  6. Boxer Thomas Hearns won a record fourth title. He had previously won welterweight and junior middleweight titles. He won his third title (WBC light heavyweight) on March 7, 1987, in a bout with Dennis Andries at Cobo Arena in Detroit. He won the fourth title (WBC middleweight) on October 29, 1987, with a fourth-round knockout of Juan Roldan in Las Vegas.
  7. Jack Morris' arbitration with the Detroit Tigers, resulting in an award on February 13 granting Morris a $1.85 salary, the richest salary in baseball arbitration to that date and an increase of $975,000 over his 1986 salary.[6]
  8. After 10 years with the Detroit Tigers, Lance Parrish signed prior to the 1987 season as a free agent with the Philadelphia Phillies.
  9. Rookie catcher Matt Nokes hit 32 home runs and was named to the American League All-Star team.
  10. For the second time in four years, Sparky Anderson was selected by the Baseball Writers' Association of America as the American League Manager of the Year.

Office holders[edit]

State office holders[edit]

Mayors of major cities[edit]

Federal office holders[edit]

Sen. Riegle
Sen. Levin

Population[edit]

In the 1980 United States Census, Michigan was recorded as having a population of 9,259,000 persons, ranking as the eighth most populous state in the country. By 1990, the state's population had grown only marginally by 0.4% to 9,259,000 persons.

Cities[edit]

The following is a list of cities in Michigan with a population of at least 50,000 based on 1980 U.S. Census data. Historic census data from 1970 and 1990 is included to reflect trends in population increases or decreases. Cities that are part of the Detroit metropolitan area are shaded in tan.

1980
Rank
City County 1970 Pop. 1980 Pop. 1990 Pop. Change 1980-90
1 Detroit Wayne 1,514,063 1,203,368 1,027,974 −14.6% Decrease
2 Grand Rapids Kent 197,649 181,843 189,126 4.0% Increase
3 Warren Macomb 179,260 161,134 144,864 −10.1% Decrease
4 Flint Genesee 193,317 159,611 140,761 −11.8% Decrease
5 Lansing Ingham 131,403 130,414 127,321 −2.4% Decrease
6 Sterling Heights Macomb 61,365 108,999 117,810 8.1% Increase
7 Ann Arbor Washtenaw 100,035 107,969 109,592 1.5% Increase
8 Livonia Wayne 110,109 104,814 100,850 −3.8% Decrease
9 Dearborn Wayne 104,199 90,660 89,286 −1.5%Decrease
10 Westland Wayne 86,749 84,603 84,724 0.1% Increase
11 Kalamazoo Kalamazoo 85,555 79,722 80,277 0.7% Increase
12 Taylor Wayne 70,020 77,568 70,811 −8.7% Decrease
13 Saginaw Saginaw 91,849 77,508 69,512 −10.3% Decrease
14 Pontiac Oakland 85,279 76,715 71,166 −7.2% Decrease
15 St. Clair Shores Macomb 88,093 76,210 68,107 −10.6% Decrease
16 Southfield Oakland 69,298 75,608 75,745 0.2% Increase
17 Royal Oak Oakland 86,238 70,893 65,410 −7.7% Decrease
18 Dearborn Heights Wayne 80,069 67,706 60,838 −10.1% Decrease
19 Troy Oakland 39,419 67,102 72,884 8.6% Increase
20 Wyoming Kent 56,560 59,616 63,891 7.2% Increase
21 Farmington Hills Oakland -- 58,056 74,611 28.5% Increase
22 Roseville Macomb 60,529 54,311 51,412 −5.3% Decrease
23 East Lansing Ingham 47,540 51,392 50,677 −1.4% Decrease

Counties[edit]

The following is a list of counties in Michigan with populations of at least 100,000 based on 1980 U.S. Census data. Historic census data from 1970 and 1990 are included to reflect trends in population increases or decreases. Counties that are part of the Detroit metropolitan area are shaded in tan.

1980
Rank
County Largest city 1970 Pop. 1980 Pop. 1990 Pop. Change 1980-90
1 Wayne Detroit 2,666,751 2,337,891 2,111,687 −9.7% Decrease
2 Oakland Pontiac 907,871 1,011,793 1,083,592 7.1% Increase
3 Macomb Warren 625,309 694,600 717,400 3.3% Increase
4 Genesee Flint 444,341 450,449 430,459 −4.4% Decrease
5 Kent Grand Rapids 411,044 444,506 500,631 12.6% Increase
6 Ingham Lansing 261,039 275,520 281,912 2.3% Increase
7 Washtenaw Ann Arbor 234,103 264,748 282,937 6.9% Increase
8 Saginaw Saginaw 219,743 228,059 211,946 −7.1% Decrease
9 Kalamazoo Kalamazoo 201,550 212,378 223,411 5.2% Increase
10 Berrien Benton Harbor 163,875 171,276 161,378 −5.8% Decrease
11 Muskegon Muskegon 157,426 157,589 158,983 0.9% Increase
12 Ottawa Holland 128,181 157,174 187,768 19.5% Increase
13 Jackson Jackson 143,274 151,495 149,756 −1.1% Decrease
14 Calhoun Battle Creek 141,963 141,557 135,982 −3.9% Decrease
15 St. Clair Port Huron 120,175 138,802 145,607 4.9% Increase
16 Monroe Monroe 118,479 134,659 133,600 −0.8% Decrease
17 Bay Bay City 117,339 119,881 111,723 −6.8% Decrease
18 Livingston Howell 58,967 100,289 115,645 15.3% Increase

Sports[edit]

Music and culture[edit]

Chronology of events[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

March[edit]

April[edit]

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

September[edit]

October[edit]

November[edit]

December[edit]

Births[edit]

  • January 6 - Ndamukong Suh, 3× ftirst-team All-Pro (2010, 2013, 2014) as a defensive tackle for the Detroit Lions, in Portland, Oregon
  • November 5 - Sienna, professional wrestler, in Detroit

Gallery of 1987 births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

Gallery of 1987 deaths[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Northwest crash, Pope's visit lead state news in 1987". Battle Creek Enquirer. December 19, 1987. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  2. ^ "Metro crash kills 154: Northwest jet slams under I-94 overpass; fiery crash is Michigan's worst air disaster". Detroit Free Press. August 17, 1987. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ "Pope reaches out to Detroit". Detroit Free Press. September 20, 1987. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  4. ^ "Slayings sadden community". Detroit Free Press. July 11, 1987. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  5. ^ "Detroit Tigers' East crown voted top state sports stories". The Herald-Palladium. December 29, 1987. p. 14 – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ "Morris Wins Richest Arbitration Ever". The Herald Palladiium. February 15, 1987. p. 20 – via Newspapers.com.