1989 in Michigan

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Events from the year 1989 in Michigan.

Top Michigan news stories[edit]

The Associated Press (AP) selected the top stories in Michigan for 1989 as follows:[1]

  1. School financing debate, including voters' rejection of two school funding proposals on the November ballot.
  2. Efforts to combat drug abuse and trafficking, including the April 2 appointment of attorney Don Reisig as Michigan's "drug czar" and raids on hundreds of suspected crack houses in Detroit.[2]
  3. Abortion controversies, including voters' rejection of the use of Medicaid funds for abortion, the Michigan House of Representatives' passage of a bill requiring girls under 18 to obtain parental consent to abortions, and clashes outside Michigan women's clinics.
  4. The September 22 drowning death of Leslie Ann Pluhar of Royal Oak after her 1987 Yugo automobile plunged into the water from the Mackinac Bridge.[3]
  5. An October 4 proposal by the Michigan Low-Level Radioactive Waste Authority to establish a dumping site for all the low-level nuclear waste from seven states at a site in St. Clair, Lenawee, or Ontonagon County.[4]
  6. The U.S. Supreme Court's November 13 deadlock in its review of a lower court ruling approving the joint operating agreement between the Detroit Free Press and The Detroit News.[5] With the legal challenge removed, the newspapers began joint publishing on November 27.[6]
  7. First-degree murder charges filed against Lawrence DeLisle after he drove the family station wagon into the Detroit River in Wyandotte, resulting in the deaths of his four children.[7] (DeLisle was found guilty after a trial in June 1990.[8] He was given five life sentences for his actions.[9] His appeals continued for a decade, but the conviction was upheld.[10])
  8. Prison construction to alleviated anticipated overcrowding.
  9. The November 29 decision by the U.S. Air Force to place 50 rail-based MX nuclear missiles at Wurtsmith Air Force Base in Oscoda, Michigan.[11] The plan was to base the missiles at Wurtsmith to be deployed by rail across the northeastern lower peninsula in the event of a threat of war.[12]
  10. The September 20 conviction in Kent County Circuit Court of nurse's aide Gwendolyn Graham in the 1987 suffocation deaths of five elderly patients at the Alpine Manor Nursing Home in Walker, Michigan.[13]

Office holders[edit]

State office holders[edit]

Mayors of major cities[edit]

Federal office holders[edit]

Sen. Riegle
Sen. Levin

Population[edit]

In the 1980 United States Census, Michigan was recorded as having a population of 9,259,000 persons, ranking as the eighth most populous state in the country. By 1990, the state's population had grown only marginally by 0.4% to 9,259,000 persons.

Cities[edit]

The following is a list of cities in Michigan with a population of at least 50,000 based on 1980 U.S. Census data. Historic census data from 1970 and 1990 is included to reflect trends in population increases or decreases. Cities that are part of the Detroit metropolitan area are shaded in tan.

1980
Rank
City County 1970 Pop. 1980 Pop. 1990 Pop. Change 1980-90
1 Detroit Wayne 1,514,063 1,203,368 1,027,974 −14.6% Decrease
2 Grand Rapids Kent 197,649 181,843 189,126 4.0% Increase
3 Warren Macomb 179,260 161,134 144,864 −10.1% Decrease
4 Flint Genesee 193,317 159,611 140,761 −11.8% Decrease
5 Lansing Ingham 131,403 130,414 127,321 −2.4% Decrease
6 Sterling Heights Macomb 61,365 108,999 117,810 8.1% Increase
7 Ann Arbor Washtenaw 100,035 107,969 109,592 1.5% Increase
8 Livonia Wayne 110,109 104,814 100,850 −3.8% Decrease
9 Dearborn Wayne 104,199 90,660 89,286 −1.5%Decrease
10 Westland Wayne 86,749 84,603 84,724 0.1% Increase
11 Kalamazoo Kalamazoo 85,555 79,722 80,277 0.7% Increase
12 Taylor Wayne 70,020 77,568 70,811 −8.7% Decrease
13 Saginaw Saginaw 91,849 77,508 69,512 −10.3% Decrease
14 Pontiac Oakland 85,279 76,715 71,166 −7.2% Decrease
15 St. Clair Shores Macomb 88,093 76,210 68,107 −10.6% Decrease
16 Southfield Oakland 69,298 75,608 75,745 0.2% Increase
17 Royal Oak Oakland 86,238 70,893 65,410 −7.7% Decrease
18 Dearborn Heights Wayne 80,069 67,706 60,838 −10.1% Decrease
19 Troy Oakland 39,419 67,102 72,884 8.6% Increase
20 Wyoming Kent 56,560 59,616 63,891 7.2% Increase
21 Farmington Hills Oakland -- 58,056 74,611 28.5% Increase
22 Roseville Macomb 60,529 54,311 51,412 −5.3% Decrease
23 East Lansing Ingham 47,540 51,392 50,677 −1.4% Decrease

Counties[edit]

The following is a list of counties in Michigan with populations of at least 100,000 based on 1980 U.S. Census data. Historic census data from 1970 and 1990 are included to reflect trends in population increases or decreases. Counties that are part of the Detroit metropolitan area are shaded in tan.

1980
Rank
County Largest city 1970 Pop. 1980 Pop. 1990 Pop. Change 1980-90
1 Wayne Detroit 2,666,751 2,337,891 2,111,687 −9.7% Decrease
2 Oakland Pontiac 907,871 1,011,793 1,083,592 7.1% Increase
3 Macomb Warren 625,309 694,600 717,400 3.3% Increase
4 Genesee Flint 444,341 450,449 430,459 −4.4% Decrease
5 Kent Grand Rapids 411,044 444,506 500,631 12.6% Increase
6 Ingham Lansing 261,039 275,520 281,912 2.3% Increase
7 Washtenaw Ann Arbor 234,103 264,748 282,937 6.9% Increase
8 Saginaw Saginaw 219,743 228,059 211,946 −7.1% Decrease
9 Kalamazoo Kalamazoo 201,550 212,378 223,411 5.2% Increase
10 Berrien Benton Harbor 163,875 171,276 161,378 −5.8% Decrease
11 Muskegon Muskegon 157,426 157,589 158,983 0.9% Increase
12 Ottawa Holland 128,181 157,174 187,768 19.5% Increase
13 Jackson Jackson 143,274 151,495 149,756 −1.1% Decrease
14 Calhoun Battle Creek 141,963 141,557 135,982 −3.9% Decrease
15 St. Clair Port Huron 120,175 138,802 145,607 4.9% Increase
16 Monroe Monroe 118,479 134,659 133,600 −0.8% Decrease
17 Bay Bay City 117,339 119,881 111,723 −6.8% Decrease
18 Livingston Howell 58,967 100,289 115,645 15.3% Increase

Sports[edit]

Baseball[edit]

American football[edit]

Basketball[edit]

Ice hockey[edit]

Other[edit]

Music and culture[edit]

Companies[edit]

The following is a list of major companies based in Michigan having at least $500 million in sales in 1989.

Company 1989 sales (millions)[22] 1989 net earnings (millions)[22] Headquarters Core business
General Motors 126,974 4,224 Detroit Automobiles
Ford Motor Company 96,932 3,835 Dearborn Automobiles
Chrysler 36,156 359 Highland Park Automobiles
Dow Chemical Company 17,730 2,487 Midland Chemicals
Whirlpool Corporation 6,318 187 Benton Harbor Home appliances
Kellogg Co. 4,662 470 Battle Creek Cereal products
Detroit Edison 3,200[23] 389[23] Detroit Electric utility
Masco 3,150 221 Taylor Home improvement and construction products
Upjohn 2,900[24] 176[24] Kalamazoo Pharmaceutical
Steelcase 1,800 na Grand Rapids Furniture
Clark Equipment Company 1,433 69 Buchanan Industrial and construction machinery and equipment
Gerber Products Company 1,190 81 Fremont Baby food
Federal-Mogul 1,084 33 Southfield automotive, commercial, aerospace, marine, rail and off-road vehicles
Herman Miller 799 45 Zeeland Furniture
La-Z-Boy 556 27 Monroe Furniture
Haworth >500[25] na Holland Furniture
Consumers Power Jackson Natural gas utility

Chronology of events[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

March[edit]

April[edit]

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

September[edit]

October[edit]

November[edit]

December[edit]

Births[edit]

Gallery of 1989 births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

Gallery of 1989 deaths[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "School financing debate billed as top state story". Lansing State Journal. December 31, 1989. p. 1D – via Newspapers.com.
  2. ^ "State drug czar tours Detroit: Reisig wants low profile in post". Detroit Free Press. April 3, 1989. pp. 3, 11 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ "Driver was alive in Mackinac plunge". Detroit Free Press. October 3, 1989. p. 11C – via Newspapers.com.
  4. ^ "3 state areas are finalists in search for nuke dump". Detroit Free Press. October 5, 1989. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  5. ^ "Detroit Free Press sees its future assured". Detroit Free Press. November 14, 1989. pp. 1, 10 – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ "Papers avert strike, start JOA". Detroit Free Press. November 27, 1989. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ "Drowned children's father is charged with murder". Detroit Free Press. August 12, 1989. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ "DeLisle found guilty in children's deaths". Detroit Free Press. June 22, 1990. pp. 1A, 6A – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ "Judge questions DeLisle verdict at sentencing". Detroit Free Press. August 2, 1990. p. 1B, 3B – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ "Dad loses drowning case appeal". Detroit Free Press. December 1, 1998. p. 3B – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ "State to get rail-based MX". Detroit Free Press. November 30, 1989. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  12. ^ "The MX: What it is, how it's coming". Detroit Free Press. December 1, 1989. p. 4B – via Newspapers.com.
  13. ^ "Jurors: Ex-aide killed 5". Lansing State Journal. September 21, 1989. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  14. ^ "1989 Detroit Tigers Statistics". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  15. ^ "1989 Detroit Lions Statistics & Players". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  16. ^ "1989 Michigan Wolverines Stats". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  17. ^ "1989 Michigan State Spartans Stats". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  18. ^ "1988–89 Detroit Pistons Roster and Stats". Basketball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  19. ^ "1988–89 Michigan Wolverines Roster and Stats". Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  20. ^ "1988–89 Michigan State Spartans Roster and Stats". Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  21. ^ "1988–89 Detroit Red Wings Roster and Statistics". Hockey-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved March 25, 2018.
  22. ^ a b Unless otherwise noted, sales and earnings figures are taken from the 1990 Fortune 500 report.
  23. ^ a b "Detroit Edison in the McCarthy Years". Detroit Free Press. March 12, 1990. p. 2E – via Newspapers.com.
  24. ^ a b "Restructuring charges blamed for Upjohn's fourth quarter loss". Detroit Free Press. February 2, 1990. p. 2E – via Newspapers.com.
  25. ^ "West Michigan furniture makers revise strategies". Detroit Free Press. March 25, 1990. p. 4G.