2014 Winter Olympics medal table

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Map displaying countries that won medals during 2014 Winter Olympics
World map showing the medal achievements of each country during the 2014 Winter Olympics
Legend:
  Gold represents countries that won at least one gold medal
  Silver represents countries that won at least one silver medal
  Bronze represents countries that won at least one bronze medal
  Red represents countries that did not win any medals
  Grey represents countries that did not participate

The 2014 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXII Olympic Winter Games, were a winter multi-sport event held in Sochi, Russia, from 7 to 23 February. A total of 2,873 athletes from 88 nations participated in 98 events in 7 sports across 15 different disciplines.[1][2]

Initially, host nation Russia matched the Soviet Union's 1976 achievement of thirteen gold medals,[α] but 4 gold medals (13 overall) were stripped later due to doping. Norway achieved the leading position in the medal table on 24 November 2017, when Russia was stripped of two gold medals in bobsleigh.[β] However, at the end of January 2018, the Court of Arbitration for Sport cleared 28 Russian athletes and 9 out of 13 medals (including 3 gold) were reinstated, allowing Russia to return to the top position.[7]

The Netherlands achieved four podium sweeps in the speed skating, dominating the men's 500 metres, men's 5,000 metres, men's 10,000 metres, and women's 1,500 metres, surpassing the previous record of two podium sweeps.[8]

Slovenia won its first Winter Olympics gold medal ever, in alpine skiing. This was also the first Winter Olympic gold medal tie.[9] Luger Armin Zöggeler of Italy became the first athlete to achieve six Winter Olympic medals over six consecutive games,[10] all achieved at the men's singles event.[11]

Speed skater Ireen Wüst from the Netherlands achieved five medals (two gold and three silver), more than any other athlete. Korean-born Russian short track speed skater Viktor Ahn, Norwegian cross-country skier Marit Bjørgen, and Belarusian biathlete Darya Domracheva tied for the most gold medals, with three each.[12]

Medal table[edit]

Tina Maze, Dominique Gisin and Lara Gut atop the podium
From left to right: Tina Maze of Slovenia (gold), Dominique Gisin of Switzerland (gold) and Lara Gut of Switzerland (bronze) atop the women's downhill alpine skiing podium in the first Winter Olympic gold medal tie.[13]
Jan Blokhuijsen, Sven Kramer and Jorrit Bergsma atop the podium with their Olympic medals
From left to right: Jan Blokhuijsen (silver), Sven Kramer (gold) and Jorrit Bergsma (bronze) with medals they earned in the men's 5,000 metres speed skating, one of the four podium sweeps by the Netherlands.[14]

The medal table is based on information provided by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and is consistent with IOC convention in its published medal tables. By default, the table is ordered by the number of gold medals the athletes from a nation have won, where nation is an entity represented by a National Olympic Committee (NOC). The number of silver medals is taken into consideration next and then the number of bronze medals.

In the women's downhill event in alpine skiing, two gold medals were awarded for a first place tie. No silver medal was awarded for the event.[15] In the men's super-G alpine skiing, two bronze medals were awarded for a third place tie.[16]

Key

  ‡   Changes in medal standings (see below)

  *   Host nation (Russia)

RankNOCGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 Russia (RUS)*double-dagger119929
2 Norway (NOR)1151026
3 Canada (CAN)1010525
4 United States (USA)double-dagger991028
5 Netherlands (NED)87924
6 Germany (GER)86519
7 Switzerland (SUI)double-dagger72211
8 Belarus (BLR)5016
9 Austria (AUT)48517
10 France (FRA)44715
11 Poland (POL)4116
12 China (CHN)3429
13 South Korea (KOR)3328
14 Sweden (SWE)27615
15 Czech Republic (CZE)2428
16 Slovenia (SLO)2248
17 Japan (JPN)1438
18 Finland (FIN)1315
19 Great Britain (GBR)double-dagger1135
 Latvia (LAT)double-dagger1135
21 Ukraine (UKR)1012
22 Slovakia (SVK)1001
23 Italy (ITA)0268
24 Australia (AUS)0213
25 Croatia (CRO)0101
26 Kazakhstan (KAZ)0011
Totals (26 NOCs)999599293

Changes in medal standings[edit]

Russian team doping case[edit]

On 18 July 2016, the McLaren Report was published alleging that the Russian government had sanctioned the use of performance-enhancing drugs by Russian athletes in the 2014 Winter Olympics.[17]

On 9 December 2016, a World Anti-Doping Agency report expanded upon the previous report and included the note that "Two [Russian] [sport] athletes, winners of 4 Sochi Olympic Gold medals, and a female Silver medal winner in [sport] had samples with salt readings that were physiologically impossible" and that "Twelve [Russian] medal winning athletes ... from 44 examined samples had scratches and marks on the inside of the caps of their B sample bottles, indicating tampering".[18]

In December 2016, following the release of the McLaren Report on Russian doping at the Sochi Olympics, the International Olympic Committee announced the initiation of an investigation of 28 Russian athletes at the Sochi Olympic Games. The number later rose to 46.

From 1 November 2017 to 22 December 2017 the IOC handled 46 cases related to Russian team doping. 3 cases have been closed without sanction and without official disclosing the names of suspected athletes. 43 Russian athletes were disqualified from the 2014 Winter Olympics and banned from competing in the 2018 edition and all other future Olympic Games as part of the Oswald Commission.[19]

All but one of these athletes appealed against their bans to the Court of Arbitration for Sport. The court overturned the sanctions on 28 athletes meaning that their Sochi medals and results are reinstated, but decided that there was sufficient evidence against 11 athletes to uphold their Sochi sanctions, and decided to postpone hearing on 3 cases.[20] The court also decided that none of the 39 athletes should be banned from all future Olympic Games, but only the 2018 Games.

Athlete Sport IOC decisions[19] CAS decision, 1 February 2018[20]
1 November 2017[21]
1  Alexander Legkov (RUS) Cross-country skiing 1st, gold medalist(s) 2nd, silver medalist(s) Disqualified Sanctions annulled
2  Evgeniy Belov (RUS) Cross-country skiing Disqualified Sanctions annulled
9 November 2017[22]
3  Julia Ivanova (RUS) Cross-country skiing Disqualified Sanctions partially confirmed
4  Alexey Petukhov (RUS) Cross-country skiing Disqualified Sanctions annulled
5  Evgenia Shapovalova (RUS) Cross-country skiing Disqualified Sanctions annulled
6  Maxim Vylegzhanin (RUS) Cross-country skiing 2nd, silver medalist(s) 2nd, silver medalist(s) 2nd, silver medalist(s) Disqualified Sanctions annulled
7  Adelina Sotnikova (RUS) Figure skating Case closed[23] -
22 November 2017[24]
8  Elena Nikitina (RUS) Skeleton 3rd, bronze medalist(s) Disqualified Sanctions annulled
9  Maria Orlova (RUS) Skeleton Disqualified Sanctions annulled
10  Olga Potylitsina (RUS) Skeleton Disqualified Sanctions annulled
11  Aleksandr Tretyakov (RUS) Skeleton 1st, gold medalist(s) Disqualified Sanctions annulled
24 November 2017[25]
12  Olga Stulneva (RUS) Bobsleigh Disqualified Sanctions annulled
13  Aleksandr Zubkov (RUS) Bobsleigh 1st, gold medalist(s) 1st, gold medalist(s) Disqualified Sanctions partially confirmed
14  Olga Fatkulina (RUS) Speed skating 2nd, silver medalist(s) Disqualified Sanctions annulled
15  Alexander Rumyantsev (RUS) Speed skating Disqualified Sanctions annulled
27 November 2017[26]
16  Sergei Chudinov (RUS) Skeleton Disqualified Sanctions annulled
17  Aleksei Negodailo (RUS) Bobsleigh 1st, gold medalist(s) Disqualified Sanctions annulled
18  Dmitry Trunenkov (RUS) Bobsleigh 1st, gold medalist(s) Disqualified Sanctions annulled
19  Yana Romanova (RUS) Biathlon 2nd, silver medalist(s) Disqualified Hearing postponed
20  Olga Vilukhina (RUS) Biathlon 2nd, silver medalist(s) 2nd, silver medalist(s) Disqualified Hearing postponed
29 November 2017[27]
21  Alexander Kasyanov (RUS) Bobsleigh Disqualified Sanctions partially confirmed
22  Aleksei Pushkarev (RUS) Bobsleigh Disqualified Sanctions partially confirmed
23  Ilvir Khuzin (RUS) Bobsleigh Disqualified Sanctions partially confirmed
1 December 2017[28]
24  Yulia Chekaleva (RUS) Cross-country skiing Disqualified Sanctions partially confirmed
25  Anastasia Dotsenko (RUS) Cross-country skiing Disqualified Sanctions partially confirmed
26  Olga Zaytseva (RUS) Biathlon 2nd, silver medalist(s) Disqualified Hearing postponed
12 December 2017[29]
27  Inna Dyubanok (RUS) Ice hockey Disqualified Sanctions partially confirmed
28  Ekaterina Lebedeva (RUS) Ice hockey Disqualified Sanctions annulled
29  Ekaterina Pashkevich (RUS) Ice hockey Disqualified Sanctions annulled
30  Anna Shibanova (RUS) Ice hockey Disqualified Sanctions partially confirmed
31  Ekaterina Smolentseva (RUS) Ice hockey Disqualified Sanctions annulled
32  Galina Skiba (RUS) Ice hockey Disqualified Sanctions partially confirmed
33  Anna Shokhina (RUS) Ice hockey Case closed[30] -
18 December 2017[31]
34  Alexey Voevoda (RUS) Bobsleigh 1st, gold medalist(s) 1st, gold medalist(s) Disqualified Sanctions partially confirmed
35  Denis Yuskov (RUS) Speed skating Case closed[32] -
22 December 2017[33]
36  Ivan Skobrev (RUS) Speed skating Disqualified Sanctions annulled
37  Artem Kuznetcov (RUS) Speed skating Disqualified Sanctions annulled
38  Tatyana Ivanova (RUS) Luge 2nd, silver medalist(s) Disqualified Sanctions annulled
39  Albert Demchenko (RUS) Luge 2nd, silver medalist(s) 2nd, silver medalist(s) Disqualified Sanctions annulled
40  Nikita Kryukov (RUS) Cross-country skiing 2nd, silver medalist(s) Disqualified Sanctions annulled
41  Alexander Bessmertnykh (RUS) Cross-country skiing 2nd, silver medalist(s) Disqualified Sanctions annulled
42  Natalia Matveeva (RUS) Cross-country skiing Disqualified Sanctions annulled
43  Liudmila Udobkina (RUS) Bobsleigh Disqualified Sanctions annulled
44  Maxim Belugin (RUS) Bobsleigh Disqualified Did not appeal to CAS
45  Tatiana Burina (RUS) Ice hockey Disqualified Sanctions annulled
46  Anna Shchukina (RUS) Ice hockey Disqualified Sanctions annulled

On 1 February 2018 the IOC said in a statement that “the result of the CAS decision does not mean that athletes from the group of 28 will be invited to the 2018 Games. Not being sanctioned does not automatically confer the privilege of an invitation” and that “this [case] may have a serious impact on the future fight against doping”. The IOC found it important to note that CAS Secretary General "insisted that the CAS decision does not mean that these 28 athletes are innocent” and that they would consider an appeal against the courts decision.[34] On 9 February 2018 the CAS dismissed 47 appeals from Russian athletes and coaches to the IOC's decision not invite these athletes and coaches to the 2018 Olympics.[35] On 19 January 2019 the IOC's appeal of Legkov's case was rejected and the organization decided not to proceed with 27 remaining cases because the chance of winning would be very low. The IOC voiced its disappointment with the decision.[36]

As for 19 January 2019, 3 Russian athletes are waiting for the CAS decicision with regard to their cases.[20]

List of official changes[edit]

Ruling date Sport / event Athlete (NOC) 1st, gold medalist(s) 2nd, silver medalist(s) 3rd, bronze medalist(s) Total Comment
List of official changes in medal standings (after the Games)
1 November 2017
9 November 2017
22 December 2017
Cross-country skiing
Men's 50 kilometre freestyle
Men's 4 × 10 kilometre relay
Men's team sprint
 Alexander Legkov (RUS),
 Maxim Vylegzhanin (RUS),
 Alexander Bessmertnykh (RUS),
 Nikita Kryukov (RUS)
(−1) (−3) (−4) On 1 November 2017, the IOC disqualified cross country skier Alexander Legkov and he was stripped of his gold medal in 50 km mass start and silver medal in relay.[21] On 9 November 2017, the IOC disqualified cross country skier Maxim Vylegzhanin and he was stripped of his two silver medals in 50 km mass start and team sprint (alongside with the stripped silver medal in the relay with Legkov).[22] Alexander Bessmertnykh who won silver medal in relay and Nikita Kryukov who won silver medal in team sprint were disqualified on 22 December 2017.[33]
22 November 2017 Skeleton
Men's event
Women's event
 Alexander Tretyakov (RUS),
 Elena Nikitina (RUS)
(−1) (−1) (−2) On 22 November 2017, the IOC disqualified men's gold medallist Alexander Tretyakov and women's bronze medallist Elena Nikitina.[24]
24 November 2017
27 November 2017
28 December 2017
Bobsleigh
Two-man
Four-man
 Alexandr Zubkov (RUS) DSQ,
 Alexey Voyevoda (RUS) DSQ,
 Alexey Negodaylo (RUS),
 Dmitry Trunenkov (RUS)
–2 −2 On 24 November 2017, the IOC disqualified bobsledder Alexandr Zubkov and he was stripped of his two gold medals.[25] His teammates in four-man bobsled Alexey Negodaylo and Dmitry Trunenkov were disqualified three days later.[26] On 18 December 2017, Zubkov's teammate in two-man bobsled and four-man bobsled, Alexey Voyevoda was also disqualified.[31] Medals were redistributed.[37][38]
  (LAT) +1 –1 +1 +1
  (SUI) +1 –1 0
  (USA) +2 –2 0
  (GBR) +1 +1
24 November 2017 Speed skating
Women's 500 metres
 Olga Fatkulina (RUS) (–1) (−1) On 24 November 2017, the IOC disqualified speedskater Olga Fatkulina and she was stripped of her silver medal.[25]
27 November 2017
1 December 2017
Biathlon
Women's sprint
Women's relay
 Olga Vilukhina (RUS) DSQ,
 Yana Romanova (RUS) DSQ,
 Olga Zaitseva (RUS) DSQ
–2 −2 On 27 November 2017, the IOC disqualified biathlete Olga Vilukhina and Yana Romanova and they were stripped of their relay silver, Vilukhina was also stripped of her silver medal in women's sprint.[26] On 1 December 2017, fellow team member Olga Zaitseva was also disqualified.[28] The CAS has not yet made a decision regarding these athletes.
22 December 2017 Luge
Men's singles
Team relay
 Albert Demchenko (RUS),
 Tatiana Ivanova (RUS)
(–2) (−2) On 22 December 2017, the IOC disqualified lugers Albert Demchenko and Tatiana Ivanova who won a combined two silver medals.[33]
1 February 2018 Cross-country skiing
Men's 50 kilometre freestyle
Men's team sprint
Men's 4 × 10 kilometre relay
Skeleton
Men's event
Women's event
Speed skating
Women's 500 metres
Luge
Men's singles
Team relay
 Alexander Legkov (RUS),
 Maxim Vylegzhanin (RUS),
 Alexander Bessmertnykh (RUS),
 Nikita Kryukov (RUS),
 Aleksander Tretyakov (RUS),
 Elena Nikitina (RUS),
 Olga Fatkulina (RUS),
 Albert Demchenko (RUS),
 Tatiana Ivanova (RUS),
 Alexey Negodaylo (RUS),
 Dmitry Trunenkov (RUS)
(+2) (+6) (+1) (+9) On 1 February 2018, the Court of Arbitration for Sport reinstated the results for medalists Alexander Legkov, Maxim Vylegzhanin, Alexander Bessmertnykh and Nikita Kryukov in cross-country skiing, Aleksander Tretyakov and Elena Nikitina in skeleton, Olga Fatkulina in speed skating, Albert Demchenko and Tatiana Ivanova in luge.[20]

The CAS removed the sanctions from Alexey Negodaylo and Dmitry Trunenkov in bobsleigh, but upheld them on their teammates Alexandr Zubkov and Alexey Voyevoda.

CAS decisions with regard to biathletes Olga Vilukhina, Yana Romanova and Olga Zaitseva are not yet made.

List of official changes by country[edit]

NOC Gold Silver Bronze Total
 Russia (RUS) −2 −2 −4
 Great Britain (GBR) +1 +1
 Latvia (LAT) +1 –1 +1 +1
 Switzerland (SUI) +1 –1 0
 United States (USA) +2 −2 0

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Russia is legally considered to be the successor state of the Soviet Union.[3]
  2. ^ The gold medal counts were previously topped by host nations in 1932 by the United States,[4] in 1952 by Norway,[5] and in 2010 by Canada.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sochi 2014". International Olympic Committee. Retrieved 25 August 2015.
  2. ^ "2014 Sochi Winter Olympics: Schedules, Medals, Results". The Huffington Post. Retrieved 22 September 2015.
  3. ^ Bühler, Konrad G. (2001). State Succession and Membership in International Organisations. Legal Aspects of International Organisation Series. Volume 38. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers. pp. 161–4. ISBN 9789041115539.
  4. ^ "1932 Lake Placid Winter Games". International Olympic Committee. Archived from the original on 8 August 2008. Retrieved 25 August 2015.
  5. ^ "1952 Oslo Winter Games". Sports Reference LLC. Archived from the original on 22 July 2011. Retrieved 25 August 2015.
  6. ^ "Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics–Medals". ESPN. Retrieved 25 August 2015.
  7. ^ "28 Russians have Olympic doping bans lifted". nbcsports.com. 1 February 2018. Retrieved 4 February 2018.
  8. ^ "Bergsma breaks Olympic record to lead fourth Dutch medal sweep". Xinhuanet. 19 February 2014. Retrieved 25 August 2015.
  9. ^ Herman, Martyn (12 February 2014). "Maze amazes as she wins Slovenia's first gold". Reuters. Rosa Khutor, Russia. Retrieved 12 February 2014.
  10. ^ Macur, Juliet (8 February 2014). "The Winning Formula of Luge's 'Old Man'". The New York Times. Retrieved 30 August 2015.
  11. ^ "Armin Zöggeler". International Olympic Committee. Retrieved 22 September 2015.
  12. ^ "2014 Sochi Winter Games". Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 25 August 2015.
  13. ^ "Women's downhill results". International Olympic Committee. Retrieved 23 September 2015.
  14. ^ "Sochi 2014: Sven Kramer defends 5,000 m speed skating title". BBC Sport. 8 February 2014. Retrieved 25 August 2015.
  15. ^ Pennington, Bill (12 February 2014). "In Women's Downhill, a Nice Round Historic Tie". The New York Times. Retrieved 12 February 2014.
  16. ^ "Alpine skiing — Men's super-G". International Olympic Committee. Retrieved 25 August 2015.
  17. ^ "Russia May Face Olympics Ban as Doping Scheme Is Confirmed". New York Times. 18 July 2016.
  18. ^ "McClaren report part II" (PDF). 9 December 2016.
  19. ^ a b "List of IOC Disciplinary decisions published to date (22 December 2017)" (PDF). International Olympic Committee. 22 December 2017. Retrieved 22 December 2017.
  20. ^ a b c d "The Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) delivered its decisions in the matter of 39 Russian Athletes v/ the IOC: 28 appeals upheld, 11 partially upheld" (PDF). Court of Arbitration for Sport. 1 February 2018. Retrieved 1 February 2018.
  21. ^ a b "IOC sanctions two Russian athletes as part of Oswald Commission findings". International Olympic Committee. 1 November 2017. Retrieved 1 November 2017.
  22. ^ a b "IOC sanctions four Russian athletes and closes one case as part of Oswald Commission findings". International Olympic Committee. 9 November 2017. Retrieved 9 November 2017.
  23. ^ Exclusive: Olympic figure skating champion cleared of doping charge by IOC but four Russian skiers disqualified
  24. ^ a b "IOC sanctions four Russian athletes as part of Oswald Commission findings". International Olympic Committee. 22 November 2017. Retrieved 22 November 2017.
  25. ^ a b c "IOC sanctions four Russian athletes as part of Oswald Commission findings". International Olympic Committee. 24 November 2017. Retrieved 24 November 2017.
  26. ^ a b c "IOC sanctions five Russian athletes and publishes first full decision as part of the Oswald Commission findings". International Olympic Committee. 27 November 2017. Retrieved 27 November 2017.
  27. ^ "IOC sanctions three Russian athletes as part of Oswald Commission findings". International Olympic Committee. 29 November 2017. Retrieved 29 November 2017.
  28. ^ a b "IOC sanctions three Russian athletes as part of the Oswald Commission findings". International Olympic Committee. 1 December 2017. Retrieved 1 December 2017.
  29. ^ "IOC sanctions six Russian athletes and closes one case as part of Oswald Commission findings". International Olympic Committee. 12 December 2017. Retrieved 12 December 2017.
  30. ^ Shokhina cleared of doping charge by IOC but six Russian ice hockey players sanctioned
  31. ^ a b "IOC sanctions one Russian athlete, and closes one case as part of Oswald Commission findings". International Olympic Committee. 18 December 2017. Retrieved 18 December 2017.
  32. ^ Exclusive: Yuskov cleared of doping by IOC as Voevoda disqualified
  33. ^ a b c "IOC sanctions 11 Russian athletes as part of Oswald Commission findings". International Olympic Committee. 22 December 2017. Retrieved 22 December 2017.
  34. ^ "IOC Statement on CAS decision". International Olympic Committee. 1 February 2018. Retrieved 1 February 2018.
  35. ^ "Admission to the Olympic Winter Games 2018: the Applications Filed by Russian Athletes and Coaches Have Been Dismissed" (PDF). Court of Arbitration for Sport. 9 February 2018. Retrieved 9 February 2018.
  36. ^ "IOC disappointed at decision of Swiss Federal Tribunal". International Olympic Committee. 19 January 2019. Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  37. ^ Olympic Winter Games 2014 2-man Bobsleig
  38. ^ Olympic Winter Games 2014 4-man Bobsleigh