2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Michigan

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2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Michigan

← 2016 November 6, 2018 (2018-11-06) 2020 →

All 14 Michigan seats to the United States House of Representatives
Turnout57.8%
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Democratic Republican
Last election 5 9
Seats before 4 9
Seats won 7 7
Seat change Increase2 Decrease2
Popular vote 2,165,586 1,847,480
Percentage 52.33% 44.65%
Swing Increase5.36% Decrease3.38%

United States House of Representatives elections in Michigan, 2018.svg
Results by Congressional district

The 2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Michigan was held on November 6, 2018, to elect the 14 U.S. Representatives from the state of Michigan, one from each of the state's 14 congressional districts. The elections coincided with the gubernatorial election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate in 33 other states and various state and local elections. The filing deadline for candidates filing for the August 7 primary was April 24, 2018.[1] Unless otherwise indicated, the Cook Political Report has rated the congressional races as safe for the party of the incumbent.

Two seats shifted from Republican to Democratic control. In the 8th Congressional District, Elissa Slotkin defeated incumbent Mike Bishop and in an open seat for the 11th Congressional District, Haley Stevens defeated Lena Epstein.[2] This leaves Michigan's U.S. House delegation in the 116th United States Congress with seven Democrats and seven Republicans.

Contents

Results summary[edit]

Statewide[edit]

Party Candi-
dates
Votes Seats
No. % No. +/– %
Democratic Party 14 2,165,586 52.33% 7 Increase2 50.00%
Republican Party 13 1,847,480 44.65% 7 Decrease2 50.00%
Working Class Party 5 52,879 1.28% 0 Steady 0.00%
U.S. Taxpayers' Party 4 27,007 0.65% 0 Steady 0.00%
Independent 3 18,299 0.44% 0 Steady 0.00%
Green Party 3 14,805 0.36% 0 Steady 0.00%
Libertarian Party 2 12,095 0.29% 0 Steady 0.00%
Total 44 4,138,151 100.00% 14 Steady 100.00%
Popular vote
Democratic
52.33%
Republican
44.65%
Working Class Party
1.28%
Other
1.74%
House seats
Republican
50.00%
Democratic
50.00%

District[edit]

Results of the 2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Michigan by district:[3]

District Democratic Republican Others Total Result
Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes %
District 1 144,293 43.71% 185,859 56.29% - - 330,152 100.00% Republican Hold
District 2 131,195 42.98% 168,843 55.31% 5,226 1.71% 305,264 100.00% Republican Hold
District 3 132,976 43.20% 167,486 54.41% 7,360 2.39% 307,822 100.00% Republican Hold
District 4 106,539 37.38% 178,509 62.62% - - 285,048 100.00% Republican Hold
District 5 164,521 59.52% 99,269 35.91% 12,646 4.57% 276,436 100.00% Democratic Hold
District 6 132,681 45.75% 145,556 50.19% 11,795 4.07% 290,032 100.00% Republican Hold
District 7 136,410 46.19% 158,885 53.81% - - 295,295 100.00% Republican Hold
District 8 172,878 50.61% 159,804 46.78% 8,928 2.61% 341,610 100.00% Democratic GAIN
District 9 181,844 59.62% 112,309 36.82% 10,865 3.56% 305,018 100.00% Democratic Hold
District 10 106,098 34.99% 182,870 60.31% 14,272 4.71% 303,240 100.00% Republican Hold
District 11 181,706 51.83% 158,331 45.17% 10,519 3.00% 350,556 100.00% Democratic GAIN
District 12 199,690 68.20% 84,220 28.76% 8,891 3.04% 292,801 100.00% Democratic Hold
District 13 163,782 84.57% - - 29,881 15.43% 193,663 100.00% Democratic Hold
District 14 210,973 80.77% 45,539 17.43% 4,702 1.80% 261,214 100.00% Democratic Hold
Total 2,165,586 52.33% 1,847,480 44.65% 125,085 3.02% 4,138,151 100.00%

District 1[edit]

The 1st district consists of the entire Upper Peninsula of Michigan and the northern part of the Lower Peninsula including Alpena, Marquette, and Traverse City. This district has a PVI of R+9. The district, which makes up about 44% of the land area of the state of Michigan, is the second-largest congressional district east of the Mississippi River by land area. The incumbent is Republican Jack Bergman, who has represented the district since 2017. He was elected to replace retiring Representative Dan Benishek with 55% of the vote in 2016. The Cook Political Report has rated this race 'likely Republican.'[4]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Matt Morgan was the only Democrat to file to run. However, Morgan was removed from the ballot because he used a PO box address on his nomination petitions instead of his residential address. Instead, Morgan ran a write-in campaign, hoping to qualify for the ballot by winning at least five percent of the total votes cast in the district for the Democratic gubernatorial primary.[5] Over 4,800 votes were cast in Marquette County, which would have been enough by itself to qualify Morgan for the ballot.[6] According to official results, Democrats cast 29,293 write-in votes in the primary for Morgan, more than seven times the 3,781-vote threshold. On August 24, the Board of State Canvassers placed Morgan on the November ballot.[7]

Failed to qualify for primary; ran successful write-in campaign to qualify for general election
  • Matthew W. Morgan, retired US Marine Corps lieutenant colonel and Iraq War veteran[8]
Withdrew
  • Dwight Brady, professor[8]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Matthew W. Morgan (write-in) 29,293 100.0
Total votes 29,293 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jack Bergman (incumbent) 83,272 100.0
Total votes 83,272 100.0

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Jack
Bergman (R)
Matt
Morgan (D)
Undecided
Change Research (D) October 27–29, 2018 574 54% 42%

Results[edit]

Michigan's 1st congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jack Bergman (incumbent) 187,251 56.3
Democratic Matt Morgan 145,246 43.7
Total votes 332,497 100.0
Republican hold

District 2[edit]

The 2nd district is located in West Michigan and is anchored by the suburbs of Grand Rapids such as Kentwood and Wyoming, other cities include Holland and Muskegon. This district has a PVI of R+9. The incumbent is Republican Bill Huizenga, who has represented the district since 2011. He was re-elected to a fourth term with 63% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary[edit]

Declared
Failed to qualify
  • Nick Schiller, political newcomer.[8]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Rob Davidson 52,221 100.0
Total votes 52,221 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bill Huizenga (incumbent) 79,620 100.0
Total votes 79,620 100.0

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Bill
Huizenga (R)
Rob
Davidson (D)
Undecided
Lake Research Partners (D-Davidson) October 11–15, 2018 400 ± 4.9% 48% 42% 7%

Results[edit]

Michigan's 2nd congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bill Huizenga (incumbent) 168,970 55.3
Democratic Rob Davidson 131,254 43.0
Taxpayers Ron Graeser 5,239 1.7
Total votes 305,463 100.0
Republican hold

District 3[edit]

The 3rd district is located in inland West Michigan, centered on the city of Grand Rapids, and extends down to Battle Creek and Marshall. This district has a PVI of R+6. The incumbent is Republican Justin Amash, who has represented the district since 2011. He was re-elected to a fourth term with 59% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary[edit]

Declared
  • Cathy Albro, educator
  • Fred Wooden, pastor[10]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Cathy Albro 42,619 68.2
Democratic Fred Wooden 19,903 31.8
Total votes 62,522 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Declared
  • Justin Amash, incumbent[10]
Failed to qualify
  • Matt Hall
  • Joe Farrington[8]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Justin Amash (incumbent) 69,817 99.9
Republican Joe Farrington (write-in) 52 0.1
Total votes 69,869 100.0

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Michigan's 3rd congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Justin Amash (incumbent) 169,107 54.4
Democratic Cathy Albro 134,185 43.2
Taxpayers Ted Gerrard 7,445 2.4
Independent Joe Farrington (write-in) 3 0.0
Total votes 310,740 100.0
Republican hold

District 4[edit]

The 4th district is located in Northern and Central Michigan including portions of the Tri-Cities region, specifically Midland, other cites include Mount Pleasant and the northern suburbs of Lansing. This district has a PVI of R+10. The incumbent is Republican John Moolenaar, who has represented the district since 2015. He was re-elected to a second term with 62% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary[edit]

Declared
  • Jerry Hilliard
  • Zigmond Kozicki[4]
Failed to qualify

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jerry Hilliard 32,263 66.5
Democratic Zigmond Kozicki 16,261 33.5
Total votes 48,524 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Moolenaar (incumbent) 80,290 100.0
Total votes 80,290 100.0

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Michigan's 4th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Moolenaar (incumbent) 178,510 62.6
Democratic Jerry Hilliard 106,540 37.4
Total votes 285,050 100.0
Republican hold

District 5[edit]

The 5th district is located along the eastern coast of Michigan, centered on the Tri-Cities region of Mid Michigan, such as Bay City and Saginaw, and stretches down into Flint. This district has a PVI of D+5. The incumbent is Democrat Dan Kildee, who has represented the district since 2013. He was re-elected to a third term with 61% of the vote in 2016. Kildee considered running for governor in 2018, but decided to run for re-election instead.[11]

Democratic primary[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dan Kildee (incumbent) 73,996 100.0
Total votes 73,996 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Michigan's 5th district has been included on the initial list of Democratic held seats being targeted by the National Republican Congressional Committee in 2018.[12] There is one Republican candidate, Durand resident Travis Wines who lives outside the district.[8]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Travis Wines 44,405 100.0
Total votes 44,405 100.0

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Michigan's 5th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dan Kildee (incumbent) 164,502 59.5
Republican Travis Wines 99,265 35.9
Working Class Kathy Goodwin 12,646 4.6
Total votes 276,413 100.0
Democratic hold

District 6[edit]

The 6th district is located in Southwestern corner of Michigan, specifically the Michiana region. The district is anchored by Kalamazoo and the surrounding areas including Benton Harbor and Niles. This district has a PVI of R+4. The incumbent is Republican Fred Upton, who has represented the district since 1993 and previously represented the 4th district from 1987 to 1993. He was re-elected to a sixteenth term with 59% of the vote in 2016. The Cook Political Report has rated this race as 'likely Republican.'[4]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
  • David Benac, professor[13]
  • Rich Eichholz, businessman and biologist[14]
  • George Franklin, former Kellogg Company executive[15][16]
  • Matt Longjohn, physician and former National Health Officer for the YMCA[17]
Failed to qualify
  • Paul Clements, professor and nominee for this seat in 2014 and 2016[18][8]
  • Eponine Garrod, local activist and quality control chemist[13]
Declined

Endorsements[edit]

George Franklin
Statewide officials
Individuals

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Matt Longjohn 22,412 37.0
Democratic George Franklin 17,493 28.9
Democratic David Benac 12,867 21.3
Democratic Rich Eichholz 7,719 12.8
Total votes 60,491 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Fred Upton (incumbent) 64,512 100.0
Total votes 64,512 100.0

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Fred
Upton (R)
Matt
Longjohn (D)
Stephen
Young (T)
Undecided
Change Research (D) November 2–4, 2018 460 40% 42% 3% 14%
Change Research (D) October 27–29, 2018 466 46% 43%
DCCC (D) October 9–10, 2018 605 ± 4.2% 49% 46%
Public Policy Polling (D) September 4–5, 2018 750 45% 41%
Global Strategy Group (D-Longjohn) August 24–29, 2018 500 ± 4.4% 47% 41% 3% 9%

Results[edit]

Michigan's 6th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Fred Upton (incumbent) 147,436 50.2
Democratic Matt Longjohn 134,082 45.7
Taxpayers Stephen Young 11,920 4.1
Total votes 293,438 100.0
Republican hold

District 7[edit]

The 7th district is located in Southern Michigan including downtown Lansing and the western suburbs of Ann Arbor including Lodi and Milan, other cities include Adrian, Coldwater, and Jackson. This district has a PVI of R+7. The incumbent is Republican Tim Walberg, who has represented the district since 2011 and previously represented the district from 2007 to 2009. He was re-elected to a fourth consecutive and fifth total term with 55% of the vote in 2016. The Cook Political Report has rated this race as 'likely Republican.'[4]

Democratic primary[edit]

Michigan's 7th district has been included on the initial list of Republican held seats being targeted by the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee in 2018.[21]

Candidates[edit]

Declared

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gretchen Driskell 52,430 85.2
Democratic Steven Friday 9,083 14.8
Total votes 61,513 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tim Walberg (incumbent) 69,248 100.0
Total votes 69,248 100.0

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Gretchen
Driskell (D)
Tim
Walberg (R)
Undecided
DCCC (D) February 19–21, 2018 400 37% 41%

Results[edit]

Michigan's 7th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tim Walberg (incumbent) 158,730 53.8
Democratic Gretchen Driskell 136,330 46.2
Total votes 295,060 100.0
Republican hold

District 8[edit]

The 8th district is centered on the state capital, Lansing, and stretches into the northern outskirts of Metro Detroit including Rochester Hills. This district has a PVI of R+4. The incumbent is Republican Mike Bishop, who has represented the district since 2015. He was re-elected to a second term with 56% of the vote in 2016. This race is considered to be competitive. The Cook Political Report rated this contest as 'Tossup'.[23][4]

Democratic primary[edit]

Michigan's 8th district has been included on the initial list of Republican held seats being targeted by the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee in 2018.[21]

Candidates[edit]

Failed to qualify
  • Darlene Domanik, attorney[10]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Elissa Slotkin 57,819 70.7
Democratic Christopher E. Smith 23,996 29.3
Total votes 81,815 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

  • Mike Bishop, incumbent
  • Lokesh Kumar[25]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Bishop (incumbent) 75,403 92.3
Republican Lokesh Kumar 6,254 7.7
Total votes 81,657 100.0

Libertarian party[edit]

  • Brian Ellison
Libertarian primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Libertarian Brian Ellison 522 100.0
Total votes 522 100.0

General election[edit]

Debates[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Mike
Bishop (R)
Elissa
Slotkin (D)
Other Undecided
Change Research (D) November 2–4, 2018 501 46% 47% 3%[26] 5%
NYT Upshot/Siena College October 31 – November 4, 2018 447 ± 5.0% 42% 49% 2% 6%
Target Insyght October 15–17, 2018 500 ± 4.5% 48% 45% 3%[27] 4%
NYT Upshot/Siena College September 28 – October 3, 2018 501 ± 4.8% 47% 44% 10%
GQR Research (D-Slotkin) September 17–20, 2018 400 ± 4.9% 43% 47% 10%
Public Opinion Strategies (R-Bishop) September 16–18, 2018 400 ± 4.9% 45% 43%
Public Policy Polling (D) April 16–17, 2018 668 ± 3.8% 46% 41% 13%
Target Insyght April 3–5, 2018 400 ± 5.0% 45% 39% 16%

Results[edit]

Michigan's 8th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Elissa Slotkin 172,880 50.6
Republican Mike Bishop (incumbent) 159,782 46.8
Libertarian Brian Ellison 6,302 1.8
Taxpayers David Lillis 2,629 0.8
Total votes 341,593 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

District 9[edit]

The 9th district is located in Metro Detroit including Roseville, Royal Oak, and Warren. This district has a PVI of D+4. The incumbent is Democrat Sander Levin, who has represented the district since 2013 and previously represented the 12th district from 1993 to 2013 and the 17th district from 1983 to 1993. He was re-elected to an eighteenth term with 58% of the vote in 2016. In December 2017, Levin announced his retirement, and that he would not seek re-election in 2018.[28]

Democratic primary[edit]

Declared
  • Martin Brook, attorney
  • Andy Levin, former head of the Michigan Department of Energy, Labor and Economic Growth, Sander Levin's son[29]
  • Ellen Lipton, former state representative[10]
Declined
  • Sander Levin, incumbent representative
  • Andy Meisner, Oakland County Treasurer[30]
Withdrew

Endorsements[edit]

Andy Levin
Federal officials
Current and former State officials
Ellen Lipton
Organizations

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Martin
Brook
Andy
Levin
Ellen
Lipton
Undecided
EPIC-MRA July 25–26, 2018 730 ± 3.7% 4% 55% 31% 10%
Lake Research Partners (D-Levin) July 9–12, 2018 400 ± 4.9% 4% 51% 12% 30%

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Andy Levin 49,612 52.4
Democratic Ellen Lipton 40,174 42.5
Democratic Martin Brook 4,865 5.1
Total votes 94,651 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Michigan's 9th district has been included on the initial list of Democratic held seats being targeted by the National Republican Congressional Committee in 2018.[12]

Declared
  • Candius Stearns, businesswoman[10]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Candius Stearns 47,410 100.0
Total votes 47,410 100.0

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Michigan's 9th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Andy Levin 181,734 59.7
Republican Candius Stearns 112,123 36.8
Working Class Andrea Kirby 6,797 2.2
Green John McDermott 3,909 1.3
Total votes 304,563 100.0
Democratic hold

District 10[edit]

The 10th district is located in an area of the Lower Peninsula of Michigan known as The Thumb and parts of the Metro Detroit area including Chesterfield, Macomb, and Port Huron. This is the most Republican friendly district with a PVI of R+13. The incumbent is Republican Paul Mitchell, who has represented the district since 2017. He was elected to replace retiring Representative Candice Miller with 63% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kimberly Bizon 21,944 41.1
Democratic Frank Accavitti Jr. 17,047 32.0
Democratic Michael McCarthy 14,353 26.9
Total votes 53,344 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Paul Mitchell (incumbent) 81,867 100.0
Total votes 81,867 100.0

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Michigan's 10th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Paul Mitchell (incumbent) 182,808 60.8
Democratic Kimberly Bizon 106,061 35.0
Independent Jeremy Peruski 11,344 3.7
Green Harley Mikkelson 2,851 0.9
Total votes 303,064 100.0
Republican hold

District 11[edit]

The 11th district is located in Metro Detroit including Livonia, Novi, and Troy. This district has a PVI of R+4. The incumbent is Republican Dave Trott, who has represented the district since 2015. He was re-elected to a second term with 53% of the vote in 2016. Trott is not running for re-election in 2018.[33][34] This race is considered to be competitive; the Cook Political Report has rated this contest as a 'toss up.'[4]

Democratic primary[edit]

Michigan's 11th district has been included on the initial list of Republican held seats being targeted by the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee in 2018.[21]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
Failed to qualify
  • Daniel Haberman, businessman and attorney[39]
Declined

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Tim
Greimel
Suneel
Gupta
Fayrouz
Saad
Nancy
Skinner
Haley
Stevens
Other Undecided
EPIC-MRA July 23–24, 2018 700 ± 3.7% 21% 14% 10% 4% 17% 34%
Target-Insyght July 16–18, 2018 500 ± 4.5% 14% 15% 7% 21% 4%[42] 39%

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Haley Stevens 24,309 27.0
Democratic Tim Greimel 19,673 21.8
Democratic Suneel Gupta 19,250 21.4
Democratic Fayrouz Saad 17,499 19.4
Democratic Nancy Skinner 9,407 10.5
Total votes 90,138 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
Failed to qualify
Declined

Endorsements[edit]

Mike Kowall

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Kerry
Bentivolio
Lena
Epstein
Klint
Kesto
Mike
Kowall
Rocky
Raczkowski
Undecided
Mitchell Research (R) July 30, 2018 305 ± 5.7% 14% 27% 11% 10% 18% 20%
EPIC-MRA July 23–24, 2018 700 ± 3.7% 7% 26% 12% 8% 19% 28%

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lena Epstein 26,925 30.9
Republican Rocky Raczkowski 22,216 25.5
Republican Mike Kowall 16,011 18.4
Republican Klint Kesto 12,213 14.0
Republican Kerry Bentivolio 9,831 11.3
Total votes 87,196 100.0

Libertarian party[edit]

  • Leonard Schwartz, attorney
Libertarian primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Libertarian Leonard Schwartz 536 100.0
Total votes 536 100.0

General election[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Lena Epstein (R)

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Lena
Epstein (R)
Haley
Stevens (D)
Other Undecided
Target Insyght October 15–17, 2018 513 ± 4.3% 48% 48% 2% 3%
ALG Research (D-Stevens) October 10–14, 2018 513 ± 4.3% 34% 44% 4%[59] 16%
Harper Polling (R-Epstein) October 10–13, 2018 465 ± 5.0% 35% 36% 2%[60] 27%
NYT Upshot/Siena College October 1–6, 2018 465 ± 5.0% 38% 45% 17%

Results[edit]

Michigan's 11th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Haley Stevens 181,912 51.8
Republican Lena Epstein 158,463 45.2
Libertarian Leonard Schwartz 5,799 1.7
Independent Cooper Nye 4,727 1.3
Total votes 350,901 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

District 12[edit]

The 12th district is based in Ann Arbor and the surrounding cities including Ypsilanti, and the western suburbs of Detroit including Dearborn and Lincoln Park. This district has a PVI of D+14. The incumbent is Democrat Debbie Dingell, who has represented the district since 2015. She was re-elected with 64% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Debbie Dingell (incumbent) 103,278 100.0
Total votes 103,278 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jeff Jones 33,839 100.0
Total votes 33,839 100.0

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Michigan's 12th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Debbie Dingell (incumbent) 200,588 68.1
Republican Jeff Jones 85,115 28.9
Working Class Gary Walkowicz 6,712 2.3
Independent Niles Niemuth 2,213 0.7
Total votes 294,628 100.0
Democratic hold

District 13[edit]

The 13th district is centered on the city of the Detroit and the immediate surrounding suburbs including Dearborn Heights, Garden City, and Westland. This is the most Democratic-friendly district with a PVI of D+32. The seat was vacant for most of 2018, following the resignation of John Conyers in December 2017.[61] A special primary and special general election were held in August and November 2018, on dates coinciding with the already scheduled primary and general elections in a money-saving move by Michigan Governor Rick Snyder.[62]

Conyers represented the district from 2013 to 2017. He previously represented the 14th district from 1993 to 2013, and the 1st district from 1965 to 1993. He was Dean of the United States House of Representatives, and was re-elected to a twenty-seventh term with 77% of the vote in 2016.

Former state representative Rashida Tlaib won the Democratic primary. Tlaib, however, lost the special primary to Brenda Jones, president of the Detroit City Council. Jones served for just over eight weeks before Tlaib was sworn in.

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
Failed to qualify
Withdrew
  • Michael Gilmore, attorney and activist[8]
Declined

Endorsements[edit]

Brenda Jones
U.S. Representatives
State legislators
  • State Rep. Sylvia Santana
Local officials
Organizations
  • Michigan AFL-CIO
  • Communications Workers of America
  • United Automobile Workers
Notable individuals
  • Greg Mathis, Judge and television personality
Rashida Tlaib
U.S. Representatives
State legislators
  • State Rep. Stephanie Chang
Local officials
  • Ilona Varga, Wayne County Commissioner from District 4
Organizations
Notable individuals
  • Michael Moore, Filmmaker
Coleman Young II
State legislators
  • State Rep. Ken Daniels
  • State Rep. Fred Durhal III
  • State Rep. Bettie Cook Scott

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Ian
Conyers
Shanelle
Jackson
Brenda
Jones
Rashida
Tlaib
Bill
Wild
Coleman
Young
Undecided
EPIC-MRA July 25–26, 2018 700 ± 3.7% 7% 5% 26% 22% 20% 9% 11%
Target-Insyght July 16–18, 2018 600 ± 4.0% 8% 4% 21% 19% 20% 14% 14%

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Rashida Tlaib 27,841 31.2
Democratic Brenda Jones 26,941 30.2
Democratic Bill Wild 12,613 14.1
Democratic Coleman Young II 11,172 12.5
Democratic Ian Conyers 5,866 6.6
Democratic Shanelle Jackson 4,853 5.4
Democratic Kimberly Hill Knott (write-in) 33 0.0
Democratic Royce Kinniebrew (write-in) 2 0.0
Total votes 89,321 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

David Dudenhoefer was the only Republican candidate to announce his run for the Republican nomination, but he failed to qualify. He did, however, run as a write-in candidate. As a result, Tlaib was opposed in the general election only by minor party candidates and write-in candidates.

Candidates[edit]

Failed to qualify
  • David A. Dudenhoefer, District GOP Chair[74]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican David Anthony Dudenhoefer (write-in) 420 14.9
Republican Other write-ins 2,391 85.1
Total votes 2,811 100.0

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Michigan's 13th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Rashida Tlaib 165,355 84.2
Working Class Sam Johnson 22,186 11.3
Green D. Etta Wilcoxon 7,980 4.1
Independent Brenda Jones (write-in) 633 0.3
n/a Write-ins 145 0.1
Total votes 196,299 100.0
Democratic hold

District 14[edit]

The 14th district stretches from the northern Detroit suburbs including Farmington Hills, Southfield, and West Bloomfield, to eastern part of Detroit. This district has a PVI of D+30. The incumbent is Democrat Brenda Lawrence, who has represented the district since 2015. She was re-elected to a second term with 79% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Brenda Lawrence (incumbent) 106,464 100.0
Total votes 106,464 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Marc Herschfus 18,546 100.0
Total votes 18,546 100.0

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Michigan's 14th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Brenda Lawrence (incumbent) 214,334 80.9
Republican Marc Herschfus 45,899 17.3
Working Class Philip Kolodny 4,761 1.8
Total votes 264,994 100.0
Democratic hold

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.michigan.gov/documents/sos/2018_Dates_600221_7.pdf
  2. ^ "Michigan Dems flip two Republican seats in U.S. House". Detroit News.
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  6. ^ jtravis@record-eagle.com, JORDAN TRAVIS. "Matt Morgan declares write-in campaign a success". Retrieved August 29, 2018.
  7. ^ "Democrat Matt Morgan will be on ballot in 1st Congressional District". Retrieved August 29, 2018.
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  26. ^ Brian Ellison (L) with 3%, David Lillis (T) with 0%
  27. ^ Brian Ellison (L) with 2%, David Lillis (T) with 1%
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  31. ^ "Steve Bieda drops out of U.S. House race to run for Spranger's office". Retrieved August 29, 2018.
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  34. ^ Roskopp, Jack. "Republican Michigan Representative Dave Trott not seeking reelection". Retrieved August 29, 2018.
  35. ^ Todd Spangler (October 17, 2017). "State Rep. Tim Greimel joins crowded congressional field". Detroit Free Press. Retrieved October 19, 2017.
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  42. ^ Daniel Haberman (failed to make ballot) 4%
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  51. ^ a b Lena Epstein. "Thank you to @RepDaveTrott for endorsing my campaign to represent #MI11. Congressman Trott has been a strong, conservative representative for our district throughout his time in Washington, and I look forward to bringing the same passion and conservative ideals to Congress". Twitter.
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  53. ^ Lena Epstein. "Thank you @realDonaldTrump for supporting our campaign to represent #MI11!". Twitter.
  54. ^ Mike Pence. "Great to be in Michigan tonight! Proud to support @LenaEpstein - an early supporter of President Trump. She'll be a fighter for the @RealDonaldTrump agenda in Congress & a strong advocate for the people of Michigan! #MI11". Twitter.
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  58. ^ "For Congress, from Metro Detroit". The Detroit News. July 12, 2018.
  59. ^ Leonard Schwartz (L) with 4%
  60. ^ Leonard Schwartz (L) with 1%, Cooper Nye (I) with 1%
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External links[edit]

Official campaign websites of first district candidates
Official campaign websites of second district candidates
Official campaign websites of third district candidates
Official campaign websites of fourth district candidates
Official campaign websites of fifth district candidates
Official campaign websites of sixth district candidates
Official campaign websites of seventh district candidates
Official campaign websites of eighth district candidates
Official campaign websites of ninth district candidates
Official campaign websites of tenth district candidates
Official campaign websites of eleventh district candidates
Official campaign websites of twelfth district candidates
Official campaign websites of thirteenth district candidates
Official campaign websites of fourteenth district candidates