2019 European Parliament election in Italy

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2019 European Parliament election in Italy

← 2014 26 May 2019 2024 →

All 73 Italian seats to the European Parliament
Opinion polls
  First party Second party Third party
  Matteo Salvini Viminale crop.jpg Nicola Zingaretti 2012 crop.jpg Di Maio 2018 (cropped).jpg
Leader Matteo Salvini Nicola Zingaretti Luigi Di Maio
Party League Democratic Party Five Star Movement
Alliance ID S&D NI
Leader since 15 December 2013 17 March 2019 23 September 2017
Last election 6.2%, 5 seats 40.8%, 31 seats 21.2%, 17 seats
Seats won 28 19 14
Seat change Increase23 Decrease12 Decrease3
Popular vote 9,175,208 6,089,853 4,569,089
Percentage 34.3% 22.7% 17.1%
Swing Increase28.1% Decrease18.1% Decrease4.1%

2019 European Parliament election in Italy.png
European election results map. Green denotes provinces with a League plurality, Red denotes provinces with a Democratic plurality, Yellow denotes those with a Five Star plurality, Gray denotes those with a Regionalist plurality.

The 2019 European Parliament election in Italy were held on 26 May 2019, electing members of the 9th Italian delegation to the European Parliament as part of the European elections held across the European Union.

Electoral system[edit]

The party-list proportional representation was the traditional electoral system of the Italian Republic from its establishment in 1946 to 1994, therefore it was also adopted to elect the Italian members of the European Parliament (MEPs) since 1979.

Two levels were introduced: a national level to divide the seats among parties and a constituency level to distribute them among candidates in open lists. Five constituencies were established, each including 2–5 regions and each electing a fixed number of MEPs. At national level, seats are divided between party lists using the largest remainder method with Hare quota. Seats are allocated to parties and then to their most voted candidates.

In the run-up to the 2009 European Parliament election, the Italian Parliament introduced a national threshold of 4%. An exception was granted for parties representing some linguistic minorities as such lists can be connected with one of the major parties, combining their votes, provided that those parties reach the 4% threshold and that candidates from minority parties obtain a sufficient number of votes, no less than 50,000 for the main candidate.

Background[edit]

In 2014, the governing Democratic Party (PD) of Prime Minister Matteo Renzi won the election with 40.8% of the vote and 31 seats, followed by the Five Star Movement (M5S) with 21.2% and 17 seats and Forza Italia (FI) with 16.8% and 13 seats. As a result, the PD was the second largest national party in the European Parliament by number of seats after the German CDU/CSU and the largest among the Progressive Alliance of Socialists and Democrats (S&D).[1] The PD's score was also the best result for an Italian party in a nationwide election since the 1958 general election, when the Christian Democracy (DC) won 42.4% of the vote.

The Democratic candidate, Carlo Calenda, during a rally in Rovigo

However, after less than three years from the 2014 electoral landslide, Renzi was forced to resign after the defeat in the constitutional referendum and his foreign affairs minister Paolo Gentiloni was appointed new head of government in December 2016.[2][3] Moreover, the 2018 general election was characterized by a strong showing of populist parties. The centre-right coalition, led by Matteo Salvini's right-wing League, emerged with a plurality of seats in the Chamber of Deputies and in the Senate while the anti-establishment M5S led by Luigi Di Maio became the party with the largest number of votes; and Renzi's centre-left came only third, with the worst electoral result of its history.[4][5] However, no political group or party won an outright majority, resulting in a hung parliament.[6] After three months of negotiation, a government was finally formed on 1 June by the M5S and the League, with the M5S-linked independent Giuseppe Conte as Prime Minister and Di Maio and Salvini Deputy Prime Ministers.[7][8]

Matteo Salvini speaks during a League's rally in Montecatini Terme

In March 2019, Nicola Zingaretti was elected secretary of the PD.[9] In April, Zingaretti presented a special logo for the election, including a large reference to "We Are Europeans", a manifesto launched by Carlo Calenda; and the symbol of the Party of European Socialists (PES).[10] Additionally, the PD is trying to forge an alliance with the Article One (Art.1)[11] and minor parties. March and April registered more developments on the centre-left side of the political spectrum. Under the new leadership of Benedetto Della Vedova, More Europe (+Eu) formed a joint list with Italy in Common (IiC),[12][13][14] the Italian Socialist Party (PSI),[15] the Italian Republican Party (PRI),[16][17] the Italian section of the European Democratic Party (EDP),[18] the Liberal Democratic Alliance for Italy (ALI)[19] and minor parties; Italian Left (SI), the Communist Refoundation Party (PRC), minor parties and individual splinters from the disbanded Free and Equal (LeU) formed The Left (Sin), a joint list inspired by the Party of the European Left (PEL);[20] and the Federation of the Greens (FdV), Possible (Pos) and Green Italy (GI) formed Green Europe (EV) under the banner of the European Green Party (EGP).[21][22] On the centre-right side, FI welcomed in its lists candidates of the Union of the Centre (UdC) and several alike minor parties while Brothers of Italy (FdI) formed a partnership with Direction Italy (DI) and minor groups.

Main parties and leaders[edit]

Outgoing MEPs[edit]

The table shows the detailed composition of the Italian seats at the European Parliament before 26 May 2019.

EP Group Seats Party MEPs
Progressive Alliance of Socialists and Democrats
31 / 73
Democratic Party 26
Article One 3
Italian Left 1
Possible 1
European People's Party
12 / 73
Forza Italia 10
Union of the Centre 1
South Tyrolean People's Party 1
Europe of Freedom and Direct Democracy
14 / 73
Five Star Movement 11
Italy in Common 1
Independents 2
Europe of Nations and Freedom
6 / 73
League 6
European Conservatives and Reformists
5 / 73
Brothers of Italy 3
Direction Italy 2
European United Left–Nordic Green Left
3 / 73
Italian Left 1
Communist Refoundation Party 1
Independents 1
Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe
1 / 73
More Europe 1
Greens–European Free Alliance
1 / 73
Federation of the Greens 1
Total 73

Summary of parties[edit]

This is a list of the main parties which participated in the election and were polled in most opinion surveys.

Party Main ideology Leader European
party
Current MEPs
Democratic Party[a] (PD) Social democracy Nicola Zingaretti PES
29 / 73
Forza Italia[b] (FI) Liberal conservatism Silvio Berlusconi EPP
11 / 73
Five Star Movement (M5S) Populism Luigi Di Maio None
11 / 73
League[c] (Lega) Right-wing populism Matteo Salvini MENF
6 / 73
Brothers of Italy[d] (FdI) National conservatism Giorgia Meloni ACRE
5 / 73
The Left[e] (Sin) Democratic socialism Several leaders PEL
3 / 73
Green Europe[f] (EV) Green politics Several leaders EGP
2 / 73
More Europe[g] (+Eu) Liberalism Benedetto Della Vedova ALDE
2 / 73
  1. ^ Running as Democratic Party–We Are Europeans–PES and including Art.1, Demo.S and Futura. The list is also in alliance with the French-speaking minority list ApE from Aosta Valley, composed of UV, UVP, ALPE, SA and EPAV.
  2. ^ Including UdC, CP, Pensioners and individual members of NcI. The list is also in alliance with SVP, German- and Ladin-speaking minority list from South Tyrol, for the occasion also including PATT from Trentino and SSk from Friuli-Venezia Giulia.
  3. ^ Including PLI and PSd'Az (Islands constituency).
  4. ^ Including MNS and DI.
  5. ^ Including SI, PRC, AET, PdS and individual splinters from the disbanded LeU.
  6. ^ Including FdV, Pos, GI and (in the North-East) Grüne.
  7. ^ Including IiC, PSI, PRI, ALI the EDP's Italian section and (in the North-East) TK from South Tyrol.

Top candidates[edit]

In the following table, the top candidates of each party/list in the five constituencies are listed.

Party North-West North-East Centre South Islands Source
Democratic Party
Giuliano Pisapia
Carlo Calenda
Simona Bonafé
Franco Roberti
Caterina Chinnici
[23][24]
Five Star Movement
Sabrina Pignedoli
Maria Angela Danzì
Daniela Rondinelli
Chiara Maria Gemma
Alessandra Todde
[25][26]
Forza Italia
Silvio Berlusconi
Antonio Tajani
Silvio Berlusconi
[27][28]
League
Matteo Salvini
[29][30]
Brothers of Italy
Giorgia Meloni
[31][32]
The Left
Eleonora Cirant
Silvia Prodi
Marilena Grassadonia
Eleonora Forenza
Corradino Mineo
[33][34]
Green Europe
Elena Grandi
Silvia Zamboni
Annalisa Corrado
Eliana Baldo
Nadia Spallitta
[35][36]
More Europe
Benedetto Della Vedova
Federico Pizzarotti
Emma Bonino
Raimondo Pasquino
Fabrizio Ferrandelli
[37][38]

Slogans[edit]

Party Original slogan English translation Source
Democratic Party Una nuova Europa, un'Italia più forte "A New Europe, a Stronger Italy" [39][40]
Five Star Movement Continuare per cambiare "Continue to Change" [41][42]
Forza Italia Per cambiare l'Europa "To Change Europe" [43][44]
League Prima l'Italia "Italy First" [45][46]
Brothers of Italy In Europa per cambiare tutto "In Europe to Change Everything" [47][48]
The Left Noi con te "Us with You" [49][50]
Green Europe Tocca a noi "It Is Our Turn" [51][52]
More Europe Un'altra Italia c'è "There Is Another Italy" [53][54]

Opinion polling[edit]

Poll results are listed according to the date of publication of the survey. Detailed data are usually published in the official website of the Italian government. The publication of opinion polls during the last 15 days of the electoral campaign is forbidden by Italian law.

Polls after April 2019
Date Polling firm Sample size PD M5S FI Lega Sin FdI EV +Eu Others Lead
8–9 May Tecnè 1,000 21.5 22.5 10.5 31.0 3.0 5.0 3.5 3.0 8.5
8–9 May Euromedia 800 21.9 21.5 10.1 29.6 2.0 5.3 1.3 3.5 4.8 7.7
8–9 May Demopolis 2,000 22.2 23.0 8.4 31.0 2.8 5.5 3.2 3.9 8.0
7–9 May Scenari Politici – Winpoll 1,500 22.1 22.7 7.8 33.8 2.1 5.8 1.3 2.4 2.0 11.1
6–9 May Ixè 1,000 20.1 20.5 9.6 30.5 3.4 5.2 1.8 4.0 4.9 10.0
5–9 May Termometro Politico 6,000 21.8 23.0 9.5 30.6 1.9 5.8 0.8 2.8 4.6 7.6
8 May Piepoli 503 21.0 22.0 10.0 30.5 2.0 5.0 1.0 3.5 5.0 8.5
7–8 May Index 800 21.1 22.3 9.2 32.4 2.7 5.0 1.7 3.0 2.6 10.1
6–8 May SWG 1,500 22.5 22.7 9.4 30.5 2.7 4.7 1.7 2.6 3.2 7.8
6–8 May Ipsos 1,000 20.5 24.9 7.8 30.9 2.1 5.7 1.8 3.2 3.1 6.0
6–8 May Bidimedia 1,455 21.2 22.4 9.0 32.2 2.5 4.7 1.7 3.0 3.3 9.8
6–8 May Demos & Pi 1,007 20.4 22.6 9.5 32.2 3.1 4.7 4.1 3.4 9.6
7 May EMG 1,642 21.2 23.5 10.3 32.2 2.6 5.0 2.8 2.4 8.7
7 May Noto 21.0 21.0 9.0 32.0 2.0 5.5 1.0 3.5 5.0 11.0
5–7 May Demopolis 1,500 22.0 23.0 8.5 31.0 2.8 5.6 3.0 4.1 8.0
4–6 May Tecnè 1,509 21.0 22.0 10.5 31.0 3.5 5.0 3.5 3.5 9.0
30 Apr–6 May SWG 1,500 22.2 22.7 9.1 30.7 2.8 4.6 1.8 2.7 3.4 8.0
24 Apr–6 May CISE 1,000 21.6 23.1 11.7 27.3 1.0 4.6 4.2 6.5 4.3
2–3 May Quorum – YouTrend 1,000 21.4 22.2 9.5 32.1 3.2 5.3 2.3 4.0 9.9
2 May Piepoli 20.5 22.0 10.0 31.0 2.0 5.5 1.0 3.5 4.5 9.0
2 May Euromedia 800 20.3 20.6 10.3 32.4 1.5 5.3 1.4 3.8 4.4 11.8
30 Apr Noto 22.0 20.0 8.5 32.0 2.5 6.0 1.5 3.0 4.5 10.0
25–30 Apr Termometro Politico 2,000 21.8 23.5 9.2 31.1 2.0 5.7 0.8 2.8 3.1 7.6
28–29 Apr Tecnè 1,000 21.4 21.5 11.2 32.2 2.8 4.9 3.1 2.9 10.7
24–29 Apr SWG 1,500 22.5 21.8 8.8 31.6 3.1 5.0 1.5 2.9 2.8 9.1
27 Apr EMG 1,536 21.9 22.9 10.1 32.2 2.5 5.1 3.0 2.3 9.3
23 Apr EMG 1,525 22.6 23.1 10.2 31.3 2.8 5.4 3.0 1.6 8.2
23 Apr Noto 21.0 20.5 8.5 33.5 2.0 6.0 1.0 3.0 4.5 12.5
22–23 Apr Demopolis 1,500 21.0 22.0 8.0 33.0 5.0 11.0 11.0
18–23 Apr Scenari Politici – Winpoll 1,500 20.5 20.1 8.7 36.4 1.9 5.4 1.7 3.1 2.2 15.9
17–23 Apr SWG 1,500 22.0 22.3 8.4 32.3 3.4 4.8 1.6 3.0 2.2 10.0
19–22 Apr Termometro Politico 1,000 22.0 23.5 9.1 31.5 2.1 5.7 1.0 2.9 2.2 8.0
20 Apr Ipsos 18.7 22.3 8.7 36.9 2.1 4.6 1.3 3.0 2.4 14.6
16 Apr EMG 1,794 21.8 22.6 9.5 32.1 2.9 4.9 2.9 3.3 9.5
16 Apr Noto 20.0 21.0 9.0 33.5 3.0 6.0 1.5 3.5 2.5 12.5
10–15 Apr SWG 1,500 21.5 22.5 8.9 32.3 2.9 4.8 1.2 3.3 2.6 9.8
Hypothetical polls until April 2019
  1. ^ In the 2018 Italian general election LeU was a joint list, mainly comprising Art.1 and SI. Some polls have included Art.1 or SI or both, sometimes together, instead of LeU. Since April 2019 some polls started to track SI along with PRC and Art.1 separately. Art.1 finally chose to run with PD.
  2. ^ In the 2018 Italian general election PaP was a joint list, including PRC and PCI, which left the alliance a few months later. Some polls have included these two parties within PaP and/or CP. In March 2019 CP's leader Luigi de Magistris announced it would not participate in the election. In April PaP decided not to run in the election.
  3. ^ Until March 2019 the results refer to the proposed joint list formed by FdV, IiC (which finally decided to side with +Eu) and GI, since April to EV, joint list of FdV, Pos and GI.

Results[edit]

Map showing the most voted party in each comune.
Seat totals by constituency. As this is a PR election, seat totals are determined by the national popular vote.
Summary of 26 May 2019 European Parliament election results in Italy →
Party European party Main candidate Votes % +/− Seats +/−
League (Lega) MENF Matteo Salvini 9,175,208 34.26 +28.12
28 / 73
+23
Democratic Party (PD) PES Carlo Calenda 6,089,853 22.74 −18.03
19 / 73
−12
Five Star Movement (M5S) None Dino Giarrusso 4,569,089 17.06 −4.11
14 / 73
−3
Forza Italia (FI) EPP Silvio Berlusconi 2,351,673 8.78 −8.04
6 / 73
−7
Brothers of Italy (FdI) ECR Giorgia Meloni 1,726,189 6.44 +2.78
5 / 73
+5
More Europe (+Eu) ALDE Emma Bonino 833,443 3.11 new
0 / 73
new
Green Europe (EV) EGP Giuseppe Civati 621,492 2.32 +1.41
0 / 73
±0
The Left (Sin) PEL Eleonora Forenza 469,943 1.75 −2.29
0 / 73
−3
Communist Party (PC) INITIATIVE Marco Rizzo 235,542 0.88 new
0 / 73
new
Animalist Party (PA) APE Cristiano Cerello 160,270 0.60 new
0 / 73
new
South Tyrolean People's Party (SVP)[a] EPP Herbert Dorfmann 142,185 0.53 +0.03
1 / 73
±0
The People of FamilyPopular Alternative (PdF–AP) EPP Mario Adinolfi 114,531 0.43 new
0 / 73
new
CasaPound ItalyUnited Right (CPI–DU) AENM Simone Di Stefano 89,142 0.33 new
0 / 73
new
Populars for Italy (PpI) EPP Mario Mauro 80,553 0.30 new
0 / 73
new
Pirate Party (PP) PPEU Luigi Di Liberto 60,809 0.23 new
0 / 73
new
New Force (FN) APF Roberto Fiore 41,077 0.15 new
0 / 73
new
Autonomies for Europe (ApE)[b] EFA Marco Gheller 17,692 0.07 new
0 / 73
new
Thought and Action Party (PPA) None Paolo La Triglia 5,041 0.02 new
0 / 73
new
Valid votes 26,783,732 96.41
Blank and invalid votes 994,450 3.59
Totals 27,780,855 100.00
Electorate and voter turnout 50,977,280 54.50
Source: Ministry of the Interior
  1. ^ List connected to Forza Italia.
  2. ^ List connected to the Democratic Party.
Popular vote
Lega
34.3%
PD
22.7%
M5S
17.1%
FI
8.8%
FdI
6.5%
+Eu
3.1%
EV
2.3%
Sin
1.8%
Others
4.3%

Detailed results[edit]

By constituency
Italian
Constituencies
Lega PD M5S FI FdI +Eu EV Sin Others T/o
# % S # % S # % S # % S # % S # % S # % S # % S # % S
North-West 3,193,908 40.61 9 1,849,085 23.51 5 873,749 11.11 2 691,037 8.79 2 443,763 5.64 2 249,778 3.18 0 193,394 2.46 0 116,507 1.48 0 254,456 3.22 0 62.67
North-East 2,381,555 40.90 7 1,388,378 23.84 4 599,106 10.29 2 339,016 5.82 0 333,390 5.72 1 202,518 3.48 0 186,018 3.19 0 84,447 1.45 0 309,139 5.31 1 62.46
Central 1,848,005 33.36 6 1,488,260 26.87 4 882,802 15.94 2 345,788 6.24 2 385,962 6.97 1 167,206 3.02 0 120,429 2.17 0 123,396 2.23 0 177,435 3.20 0 58.35
Southern 1,291,546 23.46 5 984,619 17.88 4 1,603,392 29.12 6 674,489 12.25 2 414,767 7.53 1 173,591 3.15 0 94,379 1.71 0 111,821 2.03 0 157,723 2.87 0 46.46
Islands 460,194 22.46 2 379,511 18.52 2 610,040 29.77 2 301,343 14.71 1 148,307 7.24 1 40,350 1.97 0 27,272 1.33 0 33,772 1.65 0 48,359 2.35 0 34.86
By region
Regions Lega PD M5S FI FdI +Eu EV Sin Others T/o
# % # % # % # % # % # % # % # % # %
Aosta Valley 18,525 37.17 8,084 16.22 4,830 9.69 2,684 5.38 1,618 3.25 1,844 3.70 2,322 4.66 1,331 2.67 8,606 17.26 51.91
Piedmont 813,005 37.14 524,078 23.94 290,141 13.26 198,721 9.08 130,986 5.98 72,139 3.30 50,457 2.31 32,784 1.50 76,526 3.49 64.67
Lombardy 2,107,080 43.38 1,120,933 23.08 453,863 9.34 430,141 8.86 268,414 5.53 150,192 3.09 119,667 2.46 65,182 1.34 141,669 2.92 64.10
Liguria 251,696 33.88 185,260 24.94 122,536 16.49 57,887 7.79 42,118 5.67 22,649 3.05 18,332 2.47 16,148 2.17 26,289 3.54 58.50
Trentino-South Tyrol 137,739 27.78 79,329 16.00 31,167 6.29 17,587 3.55 16,695 3.37 35,044 7.07 31,561 6.37 5,969 1.20 140,719 28.37 59.88
Friuli Venezia Giulia 245,636 42.56 128,302 22.23 55,529 9.62 38,593 6.69 43,898 7.61 17,333 3.00 17,177 2.98 9,428 1.63 21,296 3.68 57.04
Veneto 1,234,610 49.88 468,789 18.94 220,429 8.91 149,636 6.05 167,394 6.76 67,342 2.72 67,846 2.74 25,981 1.05 73,121 2.95 63.69
Emilia-Romagna 759,948 33.77 703,131 31.24 290,019 12.89 131,992 5.87 104,861 4.66 80,153 3.56 66,002 2.93 42,010 1.87 72,273 3.23 67.31
Tuscany 588,727 31.48 622,934 33.31 237,109 12.68 108,793 5.82 92,233 4.93 57,069 3.05 46,835 2.50 48,715 2.60 67,976 3.63 65.75
Umbria 171,458 38.18 107,687 23.98 65,718 14.63 28,828 6.42 29,551 6.58 12,062 2.69 7,846 1.75 9,427 2.10 16,497 4.00 67.69
Marche 291,061 37.98 170,596 22.26 141,239 18.43 42,381 5.53 44,644 5.83 21,430 2.80 17,210 2.25 12,517 1.63 25,225 3.29 62.13
Lazio 793,889 32.66 578,253 23.79 436,102 17.94 164,749 6.78 218,875 9.00 74,275 3.06 46,434 1.91 51,632 2.12 66,877 2.74 53.32
Abruzzo 205,370 35.31 98,665 16.96 130,513 22.44 54,631 9.39 40,724 7.00 13,907 2.39 9,124 1.57 10,396 1.79 18,313 3.15 52.61
Molise 36,544 24.26 22,058 14.64 43,330 28.76 23,060 15.31 9,534 6.33 2,130 1.41 1,724 1.14 3,189 2.12 9,077 6.03 53.27
Campania 419,623 19.21 417,396 19.11 739,541 33.85 298,254 13.65 127,211 5.82 55,055 2.52 32,869 1.50 40,300 1.84 54,355 2.50 47.61
Apulia 403,424 25.29 265,412 16.64 419,344 26.29 177,304 11.11 141,865 8.89 79,470 4.98 31,667 1.98 34,800 2.18 42,087 2.64 49.79
Basilicata 55,453 23.32 41,307 17.37 70,559 29.67 22,360 9.40 19,964 8.39 7,755 3.23 5,645 2.37 6,350 2.67 8,447 3.58 47.30
Calabria 164,915 22.61 133,136 18.25 194,695 26.69 97,135 13.32 76,835 10.26 13,557 1.86 11,088 1.52 15,736 2.16 24,240 3.33 43.99
Sicily 319,439 20.77 255,741 16.63 479,562 31.18 261,340 16.99 117,131 7.62 29,089 1.89 18,009 1.17 22,487 1.46 35,137 2.32 37.51
Sardinia 135,496 27.57 119,260 24.27 126,301 25.70 38.389 7.81 30.681 6.24 10.269 2.09 7,863 1.60 10,710 2.18 12,485 2.54 36.25
Abroad (EU) 21,570 17.86 39,502 32.71 16,561 13.71 7,208 5.97 2,957 2.45 10,679 8.84 11,814 9.78 4,851 4.02 5,627 4.66 7.64
By municipality (with more than 100,000 inhabitants)
Comuni Lega PD M5S FI FdI +Eu EV Sin Others T/o
# % # % # % # % # % # % # % # % # %
Ancona 12,126 28.51 12,981 30.52 7,712 18.13 2,023 4.76 2,356 5.54 1,477 3.47 1,528 3.59 1,166 2.74 1,166 2.74 54.77
Bari 36,195 21.84 33,814 20.40 45,847 27.66 17,218 10.39 11,402 6.88 8,681 5.24 3,674 2.22 4,091 2.47 4,826 2.90 66.73
Bergamo 20,246 32.41 20,391 32.64 4,247 6.80 5,280 8.45 4,142 6.63 3,218 5.15 1,983 3.17 1,084 1.74 1,876 3.01 70.24
Bologna 40,282 21.82 74,474 40.33 20,008 10.84 10,683 5.79 8,592 4.65 9,315 5.04 8,423 4.56 7,555 4.09 5,105 2.88 63.35
Bolzano 14,755 30.87 8,336 17.44 3,803 7.96 1,889 3.95 2,039 4.27 3,458 7.24 4,417 9.24 800 1.67 8,297 17.36 61.41
Brescia 31,285 35.36 27,356 30.92 7,306 8.26 6,736 7.61 4,853 5.49 3,643 4.12 2,989 3.38 1,709 1.93 2,593 2.93 63.13
Cagliari 12,741 22.71 17,389 30.99 10,632 18.95 5,047 8.99 4,155 7.40 1,798 3.20 1,185 2.11 1,792 3.19 1,375 2.46 44.07
Catania 17,256 18.95 17,674 19.41 30,447 33.44 12,380 13.59 7,083 7.78 1,234 1.36 1,309 1.44 1,773 1.95 1,907 2.08 37.11
Ferrara 27,783 36.65 22,002 29.03 7,894 10.41 4,247 5.60 4,384 5.78 3,447 4.55 2,459 3.24 1,277 1.68 2,309 3.06 73.04
Florence 38,931 20.26 83,959 43.70 18,735 9.75 10,581 5.51 10,084 5.25 9,502 4.95 7,332 3.82 7,280 3.79 5,737 2.97 69.90
Foggia 20,072 26.50 10,129 13.37 24,602 32.47 8,939 11.80 4,868 6.43 2,487 3.28 1,032 1.36 798 1.05 2,830 3.74 68.27
Forlì 19,606 32.25 19,959 32.83 7,588 12.48 4,183 6.88 2,645 4.35 1,953 3.21 1,693 2.78 944 1.55 2,232 3.67 69.61
Genoa 70,663 27.56 77,044 30.05 47,080 18.36 16,292 6.35 13,259 5.17 9,941 3.88 7,290 2.84 6,774 2.64 8,057 3.15 55.05
Giugliano in Campania 5,337 15.98 5,542 16.60 14,503 43.43 4,180 12.52 1,713 5.13 554 1.66 563 1.69 432 1.29 571 1.70 37.26
Latina 22,874 41.88 8,431 15.44 9,118 16.70 3,864 7.08 5,358 9.87 1,774 3.25 881 1.61 659 1.21 1,655 2.96 53.72
Livorno 20,997 25.17 29,248 35.06 13,706 16.43 3,441 4.12 3,484 4.18 2,329 2.79 2,685 3.22 2,711 3.25 4,819 5.78 64.38
Messina 12,338 18.32 11,709 17.38 16,974 25.20 13,223 19.63 5,951 8.83 2,823 4.19 740 1.10 984 1.46 2,619 3.89 36.66
Milan 157,227 27.39 206,468 35.97 48,958 8.53 58,457 10.18 29,618 5.16 30,573 5.33 17,977 3.13 12,147 2.12 12,528 2.19 58.70
Modena 24,834 26.10 37,915 39.85 11,202 11.77 5,323 5.59 4,416 4.64 3,544 3.72 3,513 3.69 1,898 1.99 2,500 2.65 70.94
Monza 19,147 33.72 16,516 29.09 5,174 9.11 6,185 10.89 3,342 5.89 2,668 4.70 1,710 3.01 688 1.21 1,354 2.38 61.18
Naples 36,657 12.36 69,074 23.29 118,221 39.86 27,109 9.14 13,122 4.42 9,352 3.15 6,512 2.20 9,827 3.31 6,746 2.27 40.03
Novara 16,393 35.64 11,893 25.86 5,458 11.87 3,980 8.65 4,001 8.70 1,428 3.10 996 2.17 476 1.03 1,367 2.98 61.32
Padua 33,225 33.23 31,860 31.87 8,799 8.80 6,042 6.04 6,401 6.40 4,887 4.89 3,995 4.00 2,204 2.20 2,557 2.57 64.05
Palermo 39,639 18.74 42,153 19.92 66,625 31.49 29,146 13.78 12,862 6.08 6,723 3.18 4,759 2.25 5,090 2.41 4,576 2.15 41.03
Parma 27,065 31.60 25,225 29.46 9,435 11.02 4,626 5.40 4,707 5.50 7,141 8.34 3,195 3.73 1,784 2.08 2,461 2.87 60.57
Perugia 27,354 31.57 22,930 26.47 11,483 13.25 6,198 7.15 7,754 8.95 2,973 3.43 2,295 2.65 2,087 2.41 3,565 4.12 71.35
Pescara 18,966 30.13 13,039 20.71 12,634 20.07 6,899 10.96 4,506 7.16 1,577 2.51 1,496 2.38 1,411 2.24 2,418 3.84 65.56
Piacenza 17,097 38.27 10,575 23.67 4,560 10.21 3,302 7.39 3,179 7.12 2,673 5.98 1,219 2.73 853 1.91 1,217 2.72 60.64
Prato 30,509 33.99 29,298 32.64 10,326 11.51 5,572 6.21 4,968 5.54 3,061 3.41 1,842 2.05 1,411 1.57 2,764 3.08 70.48
Ravenna 23,973 31.44 25,148 32.98 10,723 14.06 4,059 5.32 3,223 4.23 3,168 4.16 2,124 2.79 1,396 1.83 2,428 3.19 63.67
Reggio Calabria 12,741 22.41 13,828 24.32 12,012 21.13 6,933 12.19 6,622 11.65 932 1.64 1,296 2.28 794 1.40 1,695 3.00 41.11
Reggio Emilia 21,422 26.04 30,664 37.27 11,605 14.11 4,145 5.04 3,164 3.85 3,894 4.73 2,751 3.34 2,121 2.58 2,500 3.04 68.88
Rimini 23,058 34.21 18,094 26.85 10,219 15.16 4,980 7.39 3,455 5.13 2,221 3.30 2,263 3.36 1,216 1.80 1,889 2.80 58.60
Rome 285,318 25.78 338,885 30.62 194,545 17.58 61,638 5.57 96,299 8.70 44,310 4.00 24,614 2.22 31,731 2.87 29,504 2.66 48.91
Salerno 10,511 19.07 15,075 27.35 12,940 23.48 5,512 10.00 3,105 5.63 2,658 4.82 1,848 3.35 1,850 3.36 1,617 2.94 51.14
Sassari 11,265 25.48 12,269 27.75 11,699 26.46 2,755 6.23 2,146 4.85 1,278 2.89 769 1.74 775 1.75 1,260 2.85 42.76
Syracuse 6,227 17.94 7,217 20.79 12,123 34.93 2,932 8.45 3,832 11.04 551 1.59 545 1.57 623 1.79 658 1.90 35.77
Taranto 15,535 24.67 10,978 17.44 17,485 27.77 5,843 9.28 4,184 6.65 2,437 3.87 3,784 6.01 1,051 1.67 1,662 2.64 39.87
Terni 17,736 37.46 11,109 23.47 8,237 17.40 2,880 6.08 2,746 5.80 1,312 2.77 681 1.44 1,009 2.13 1,631 3.45 56.05
Trento 16,077 28.72 19,465 34.78 4,912 8.78 2,680 4.79 2,805 5.01 2,365 4.23 2,713 4.85 1,339 2.39 3,616 6.45 60.10
Trieste 27,911 33.13 21,476 25.49 9,821 11.66 5,891 6.99 6,099 7.24 3,404 4.04 3,632 4.31 2,489 2.95 3,533 4.20 50.96
Turin 106,567 26.89 132,639 33.47 52,803 13.33 31,373 7.92 21,739 5.49 18,135 4.58 10,936 2.76 8,970 2.26 13,073 3.30 60.95
Venice 42,093 37.07 31,521 27.76 13,966 12.30 5,551 4.89 5,574 4.91 4,418 3.89 4,482 3.95 2,592 2.28 3,356 2.95 57.61
Verona 44,620 37.06 30,418 25.26 11,634 9.66 7,621 6.33 10,513 8.73 5,247 4.36 4,565 3.79 2,087 1.73 3,691 3.08 62.20
Vicenza 19,504 38.47 14,341 28.29 4,339 8.56 3,046 6.01 3,144 6.20 2,112 4.17 2,114 4.17 775 1.53 1,324 2.60 59.16
Total 1,556,158 26.63 1,730,511 29.62 1,002,140 17.15 450,884 7.72 373,894 6.40 242,676 4.15 168,809 2.89 142,523 2.44 175,464 3.00 54.18

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