400 metres hurdles at the Olympics

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400 metres hurdles
at the Olympic Games
Mens 400m Hurdles Semifinals 3683.jpg
The 2012 Olympic men's 400 m hurdles semi-final
Overview
SportAthletics
GenderMen and women
Years heldMen: 19001908, 19202016
Women: 19842016
Olympic record
Men46.78 Kevin Young (1992)
Women52.64 Melaine Walker (2008)
Reigning champion
Men Kerron Clement (USA)
Women Dalilah Muhammad (USA)

The 400 metres hurdles at the Summer Olympics is the longest hurdling event held at the multi-sport event. The men's 400 m hurdles has been present on the Olympic athletics programme since 1900, with a sole gap at the 1912 Summer Olympics. The women's event was added to the programme over eighty years later, at the 1984 Olympics. It is the most prestigious 400 m hurdles race at elite level.

The Olympic records for the event are 46.78 seconds for men, set by Kevin Young in 1992, and 52.64 seconds for women, set by Melaine Walker in 2008. Young's time remains the men's world record for the event. That record has been broken at the Olympics on seven occasions: 1908 (the first official IAAF record), 1920, 1932, 1968, 1972, 1976 and 1992. The women's world record has never been broken in Olympic competition.[1]

Edwin Moses is the most successful athlete in the event, having won two gold and one bronze medal. Glenn Davis, Angelo Taylor and Felix Sanchez have also won two Olympic 400 m hurdles titles. Morgan Taylor is the only other athlete beside Moses that has won three medals in the event. Deon Hemmings is the most successful woman, with her 1996 gold and 2000 silver medals, and is the only female athlete to win multiple medals. It is relatively common for 400 m hurdles athletes to also be part of their nation's team for the 4×400 metres relay at the Olympics.

The United States is by far the most successful nation in the men's event with 18 gold medals and 40 medals overall—more than half the medals available. American men have swept the medals on five occasions. The American women have the highest medal total, with seven, but an American woman has never won the event. Russia and Jamaica are the only nations to win multiple women's gold medals, with two each. Great Britain is the only nation to have won a gold medal in both the men's and women's event, having three champions in total.

Medal summary[edit]

Men[edit]

Games Gold Silver Bronze
1900 Paris
details
Walter Tewksbury
 United States
Henri Tauzin
 France
George Orton
 Canada
1904 St. Louis
details
Harry Hillman
 United States
Frank Waller
 United States
George Poage
 United States
1908 London
details
Charles Bacon
 United States
Harry Hillman
 United States
Jimmy Tremeer
 Great Britain
1912 Stockholm not included in the Olympic program
1920 Antwerp
details
Frank Loomis
 United States
John Norton
 United States
August Desch
 United States
1924 Paris
details
Morgan Taylor
 United States
Erik Wilén
 Finland
Ivan Riley
 United States
1928 Amsterdam
details
David Burghley
 Great Britain
Frank Cuhel
 United States
Morgan Taylor
 United States
1932 Los Angeles
details
Bob Tisdall
 Ireland
Glenn Hardin
 United States
Morgan Taylor
 United States
1936 Berlin
details
Glenn Hardin
 United States
John Loaring
 Canada
Miguel White
 Philippines
1948 London
details
Roy Cochran
 United States
Duncan White
 Ceylon
Rune Larsson
 Sweden
1952 Helsinki
details
Charles Moore
 United States
Yuriy Lituyev
 Soviet Union
John Holland
 New Zealand
1956 Melbourne
details
Glenn Davis
 United States
Eddie Southern
 United States
Josh Culbreath
 United States
1960 Rome
details
Glenn Davis
 United States
Clifton Cushman
 United States
Dick Howard
 United States
1964 Tokyo
details
Rex Cawley
 United States
John Cooper
 Great Britain
Salvatore Morale
 Italy
1968 Mexico City
details
David Hemery
 Great Britain
Gerhard Hennige
 West Germany
John Sherwood
 Great Britain
1972 Munich
details
John Akii-Bua
 Uganda
Ralph Mann
 United States
David Hemery
 Great Britain
1976 Montreal
details
Edwin Moses
 United States
Michael Shine
 United States
Yevgeniy Gavrilenko
 Soviet Union
1980 Moscow
details
Volker Beck
 East Germany
Vasyl Arkhypenko
 Soviet Union
Gary Oakes
 Great Britain
1984 Los Angeles
details
Edwin Moses
 United States
Danny Harris
 United States
Harald Schmid
 West Germany
1988 Seoul
details
André Phillips
 United States
Amadou Dia Ba
 Senegal
Edwin Moses
 United States
1992 Barcelona
details
Kevin Young
 United States
Winthrop Graham
 Jamaica
Kriss Akabusi
 Great Britain
1996 Atlanta
details
Derrick Adkins
 United States
Samuel Matete
 Zambia
Calvin Davis
 United States
2000 Sydney
details
Angelo Taylor
 United States
Hadi Al-Somaily
 Saudi Arabia
Llewellyn Herbert
 South Africa
2004 Athens
details
Félix Sánchez
 Dominican Republic
Danny McFarlane
 Jamaica
Naman Keïta
 France
2008 Beijing
details
Angelo Taylor
 United States
Kerron Clement
 United States
Bershawn Jackson
 United States
2012 London
details
Félix Sánchez
 Dominican Republic
Michael Tinsley
 United States
Javier Culson
 Puerto Rico
2016 Rio de Janeiro
details
Kerron Clement
 United States
Boniface Mucheru Tumuti
 Kenya
Yasmani Copello
 Turkey

Multiple medalists[edit]

Rank Athlete Nation Olympics Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Edwin Moses  United States (USA) 1976–1988 2 0 1 3
2= Glenn Davis  United States (USA) 1956–1960 2 0 0 2
2= Angelo Taylor  United States (USA) 2000–2008 2 0 0 2
2= Felix Sanchez  Dominican Republic (DOM) 2004–2012 2 0 0 2
5= Harry Hillman  United States (USA) 1904–1908 1 1 0 2
5= Glenn Hardin  United States (USA) 1932–1936 1 1 0 2
7 Morgan Taylor  United States (USA) 1924–1932 1 0 2 3
8 David Hemery  Great Britain (GBR) 1968–1972 1 0 1 2

Medals by country[edit]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  United States (USA) 18 12 10 40
2  Great Britain (GBR) 2 1 5 8
3  Dominican Republic (DOM) 2 0 0 2
4=  East Germany (GDR) 1 0 0 1
4=  Ireland (IRL) 1 0 0 1
4=  Uganda (UGA) 1 0 0 1
7  Soviet Union (URS) 0 2 1 3
8  Jamaica (JAM) 0 2 0 2
9=  Canada (CAN) 0 1 1 2
9=  France (FRA) 0 1 1 2
9=  West Germany (FRG) 0 1 1 2
12=  Ceylon (CEY) 0 1 0 1
12=  Finland (FIN) 0 1 0 1
12=  Saudi Arabia (KSA) 0 1 0 1
12=  Senegal (SEN) 0 1 0 1
12=  Zambia (ZAM) 0 1 0 1
17=  Italy (ITA) 0 0 1 1
17=  New Zealand (NZL) 0 0 1 1
17=  Philippines (PHI) 0 0 1 1
17=  Puerto Rico (PUR) 0 0 1 1
17=  South Africa (RSA) 0 0 1 1
17=  Sweden (SWE) 0 0 1 1

Women[edit]

Games Gold Silver Bronze
1984 Los Angeles
details
Nawal El Moutawakel
 Morocco
Judi Brown
 United States
Cristieana Cojocaru
 Romania
1988 Seoul
details
Debbie Flintoff-King
 Australia
Tatyana Ledovskaya
 Soviet Union
Ellen Fiedler
 East Germany
1992 Barcelona
details
Sally Gunnell
 Great Britain
Sandra Farmer-Patrick
 United States
Janeene Vickers
 United States
1996 Atlanta
details
Deon Hemmings
 Jamaica
Kim Batten
 United States
Tonja Buford-Bailey
 United States
2000 Sydney
details
Irina Privalova
 Russia
Deon Hemmings
 Jamaica
Nezha Bidouane
 Morocco
2004 Athens
details
Fani Halkia
 Greece
Ionela Târlea-Manolache
 Romania
Tetyana Tereshchuk-Antipova
 Ukraine
2008 Beijing
details
Melaine Walker
 Jamaica
Sheena Tosta
 United States
Tasha Danvers
 Great Britain
2012 London
details
Natalya Antyukh
 Russia
Lashinda Demus
 United States
Zuzana Hejnová
 Czech Republic
2016 Rio de Janeiro
details
Dalilah Muhammad
 United States
Sara Petersen
 Denmark
Ashley Spencer
 United States

Multiple medalists[edit]

Rank Athlete Nation Olympics Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Deon Hemmings  Jamaica (JAM) 1996–2000 1 1 0 2

Medalists by country[edit]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Jamaica (JAM) 2 1 0 3
2  Russia (RUS) 2 0 0 2
3  United States (USA) 1 5 3 9
4=  Great Britain (GBR) 1 0 1 2
4=  Morocco (MAR) 1 0 1 2
6=  Australia (AUS) 1 0 0 1
6=  Greece (GRE) 1 0 0 1
8  Romania (ROU) 0 1 1 2
9=  Denmark (DEN) 0 1 0 1
9=  Soviet Union (URS) 0 1 0 1
11=  Czech Republic (CZE) 0 0 1 1
11=  East Germany (GDR) 0 0 1 1
11=  Ukraine (UKR) 0 0 1 1

References[edit]

Participation and athlete data
Olympic record progressions
Specific
  1. ^ "12th IAAF World Championships In Athletics: IAAF Statistics Handbook. Berlin 2009" (PDF). Monte Carlo: IAAF Media & Public Relations Department. 2009. pp. Pages 546, 554, 664. Archived from the original (pdf) on June 29, 2011. Retrieved August 4, 2009.

External links[edit]