Aethionema

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Aethionema
Aethionema grandiflora0.jpg
Aethionema grandiflorum
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Tracheophytes
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Rosids
Order: Brassicales
Family: Brassicaceae
Subfamily: Brassicoideae
Genus: Aethionema
R.Br.
Synonyms[1]
  • Acanthocardamum Thell.
  • Campyloptera Boiss.
  • Crenularia Boiss.
  • Diastrophis Fisch. & C.A.Mey.
  • Disynoma Raf.
  • Eunomia DC.
  • Iondra Raf.
  • Lipophragma Schott & Kotschy ex Boiss.

Aethionema is a genus of flowering plants within the family Brassicaceae, subfamily Brassicoideae. They are known as stonecresses. Stonecresses originate from sunny limestone mountainsides in Europe and West Asia, especially Turkey.

Etymology[edit]

The Latin name Aethionema derives from ancient Greek αἴθειν "to light up, kindle" + νῆμα "thread, yarn".[citation needed] The English name "stonecress" derives from its creeping habit and its favoured stony or rocky sites.[2]

Species[edit]

Species include:[1]

Cultivation[edit]

Aethionema species are grown for their profuse racemes of cruciform flowers in shades of red, pink or white, usually produced in spring and early summer. A favoured location is the rock garden or wall crevice. They appreciate well-drained alkaline soil conditions, but can be short-lived.[3] The hybrid cultivar 'Warley Rose' is a subshrub with bright pink flowers. It has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.[4][5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Aethionema R.Br". Plants of the World Online. Royal Botanical Gardens Kew. Retrieved 2018-10-14.
  2. ^ Shorter Oxford English dictionary, 6th ed. United Kingdom: Oxford University Press. 2007. p. 3804. ISBN 0199206872.
  3. ^ RHS A-Z encyclopedia of garden plants. United Kingdom: Dorling Kindersley. 2008. p. 1136. ISBN 1405332964.
  4. ^ "Aethionema 'Warley Rose' AGM". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 25 July 2013.
  5. ^ "AGM Plants - Ornamental" (PDF). www.rhs.org. Royal Horticultural Society. July 2017. p. 3. Retrieved 27 September 2019.