All-Ireland Minor Hurling Championship

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GAA Hurling All-Ireland Minor Championship
Current season or competition:
2020 All-Ireland Minor Hurling Championship
All-Ireland Minor Championships logo.jpg
IrishCraobh Iomána Mionúr na hÉireann
CodeHurling
Founded1928; 93 years ago (1928)
RegionRepublic of Ireland Ireland (GAA)
TrophyIrish Press Cup
No. of teams5
Title holdersColours of Galway.svg Galway (13th title)
First winnerColours of Cork.svg Cork
Most titlesColours of Kilkenny.svg Kilkenny (21 titles)
SponsorsElectric Ireland
TV partner(s)TG4
MottoThis is major
Official websiteOfficial website

The GAA Hurling All-Ireland Minor Championship (known for sponsorship reasons as the Electric Ireland GAA Hurling All-Ireland Minor Championship) is an annual inter-county hurling competition organised by the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA). It is the highest inter-county hurling competition for male players under the age of 17 in Ireland and has been contested every year - except for a three-year absence during the Emergency - since 1928.

The final, currently held on the third Sunday in August, is the culmination of a series of games played during July and August, with the winning team receiving the Irish Press Cup. The qualification procedures for the championship have changed several times throughout its history. Currently, qualification is limited to teams competing in the Leinster and Munster Championships as well as Galway. Having previously been played on a straight knockout basis, the championship has incorporated a round robin since 2018.

Five teams currently participate in the All-Ireland Championship, with the most successful teams coming from the provinces of Leinster and Munster. Kilkenny, Cork and Tipperary are considered "the big three" of hurling. They have won 59 championships between them.

The title has been won by 10 different teams, 9 of whom have won the title more than once. The all-time record-holders are Kilkenny, who have won the championship on 21 occasions. Galway are the current champions.[1]

History[edit]

Creation[edit]

Since 1887 the All-Ireland Senior Championship had provided inter-county games for adult males. This was supplemented by the creation of the All-Ireland Junior Championship in 1912 which provided a springboard to develop players before progressing to senior level. The All-Ireland Minor Championship was the third championship to be created and was aimed at developing younger players who were under the age of 18.

Beginning[edit]

The inaugural All-Ireland Championship in 1928 used a provincial format. 12 teams contested the respective championships in Leinster and Munster, with Cork and Dublin emerging as the respective champions. There were no representatives in Connacht or Ulster.

Cork and Dublin contested the first All-Ireland Championship match - the delayed final - on Sunday 1 September 1929 at Croke Park, Dublin. After a draw on the first day, Cork won the All-Ireland final replay on 27 October 1929 to take the title.

Development[edit]

The first two All-Ireland Championships featured the Munster and Leinster champions facing off in the All-Ireland final. The Ulster Championship was introduced in the 1930 necessitating the need for an All-Ireland semi-final to be introduced. The Connacht champions qualified for the first time in 1931, with the four provincial winners participating in two All-Ireland semi-finals. Over time the Leinster and Munster teams grew to become the superpowers of the game, as Gaelic football was the more dominant sport in Ulster and Connacht. After some time Galway became the only credible team in Connacht and was essentially given an automatic pass to the All-Ireland semi-final every year. This knock-out system persisted for nearly 60 years and was considered to be the fairest system as the All-Ireland champions would always be the only undefeated team of the year.

In the mid-1990s the Gaelic Athletic Association looked at developing a new system whereby a defeat in the championship for certain teams would not mean an immediate exit from the Championship. In the 1997 championship the first major change in format arrived when the 'back-door system' was introduced. This new structure allowed the defeated Munster and Leinster finalists another chance to regain a place in the All-Ireland semi-finals. Clare and Offaly were the first two teams to benefit from the new system when they qualified for the very first All-Ireland quarter-finals. Clare subsequently became the first team to win the All-Ireland Championship through the 'back-door' after a 1-11 to 1-09 defeat of Galway in the All-Ireland final.

Age reduction[edit]

On 26 January 2008, a radical motion was brought before a special Congress in an effort to combat player burnout. It was proposed to merge the existing under-21 and minor championships to create a new All-Ireland Under-19 Hurling Championship.[2] This motion was defeated by 115 votes to 58.[3]

In an effort to combat player burnout, a new proposal to change the championship from an under-18 competition to an under-17 one was introduced by GAA Director-General Páraic Duffy at Congress on 26 February 2016. The motion was narrowly passed by a 68.2% majority.[4]

Team dominance[edit]

Since the beginning the championship has been dominated by Cork, Kilkenny and Tipperary. As of 2019, they have won a combined total of 59 of the 89 championship titles. These three teams began their hegemony by winning 12 of the first 14 championship titles between 1928 and 1941. Cork and Tipperary set the first championship record during this time by becoming the first two teams to win three successive All-Ireland Championships. Dublin became the first team outside of the "big three" to win successive All-Ireland Championships in 1945 and 1946. Tipperary dominated the post-Emergency era by contesting 15 of the 18 All-Ireland finals between 1945 and 1962, including six-in-a-row between 1952 and 1957. They claimed a further eight All-Ireland Championships during this time. After Kilkenny became the third team to win three successive All-Ireland Championships between 1960 and 1962, Wexford won their only three All-Ireland Championships between 1963 and 1968 as Cork reemerged to dominate the fifteen-year period between 1964 and 1979. During this time they claimed eight All-Ireland Championships from 12 final appearances. Kilkenny also reestablished themselves as the standard bearers of the Leinster Championship during this time and won five All-Ireland Championships from 12 final appearances between 1969 and 1984. The 1980s saw Galway and Offaly claim their first All-Ireland Championships, while Limerick secured the Centenary-year title after a lapse of nearly 30 years. Galway emerged as the most dominant team of the 21st century. Between 1999 and 2019 they claimed 10 All-Ireland Championships from 15 final appearances.

Current format[edit]

Championship[edit]

There are five teams in the All-Ireland Championship. During the course of a championship season (from July to August) six games are played comprising three group stage quarter-finals, two semi-finals and a final.

Qualification and progression[edit]

Teams entering in this round Teams advancing from previous round
Group stage
(3 teams)
  • Leinster runners-up
  • Munster runners-up
  • Galway
Semi-finals
(4 teams)
  • Leinster champions
  • Munster champions
  • 2 winners from the group stage
Final
(2 teams)
  • 2 winners from the semi-finals

Trophy and medals[edit]

At the end of the All-Ireland final, the winning team is presented with a trophy. The Irish Press Cup is held by the winning team until the following year's final. Traditionally, the presentation is made at a special rostrum in the Ard Chomairle section of the Hogan Stand where GAA and political dignitaries and special guests view the match.

The cup is decorated with ribbons in the colours of the winning team. During the game the cup actually has both teams' sets of ribbons attached and the runners-up ribbons are removed before the presentation. The winning captain accepts the cup on behalf of his team before giving a short speech. Individual members of the winning team then have an opportunity to come to the rostrum to lift the cup.

On 30 August 1949, The Irish Press Ltd. announced that they had presented a silver cup to the Gaelic Athletic Association to mark the 21st anniversary of the All-Ireland Championship. The cup is modelled on an ancient Celtic mether.[5] The cup was first presented to John O'Grady of Tipperary in 1949.

In accordance with GAA rules, the Central Council awards up to twenty-six gold medals to the winners of the All-Ireland final. The medals are 9 carat gold and depict the design of the GAA. Trophies are awarded to the All-Ireland runners-up.

Top winners[edit]

No. Team Wins Years won Losses Years lost
1 Colours of Kilkenny.svg Kilkenny 21 1931, 1935, 1936, 1950, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1981, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1993, 2002, 2003, 2008, 2010, 2014 23 1930, 1932, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1948, 1949, 1956, 1957, 1959, 1969, 1971, 1974, 1976, 1978, 1979, 1984, 1995, 1998, 2004, 2009, 2018, 2019
2 Colours of Roscommon.svg Tipperary 20 1930, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1947, 1949, 1952, 1953, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1959, 1976, 1980, 1982, 1996, 2006, 2007, 2012, 2016 13 1935, 1945, 1946, 1950, 1954, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1987, 1991, 1999, 2002, 2015, 2019
3 Colours of Cork.svg Cork 18 1928, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1941, 1951, 1964, 1967, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1974, 1978, 1979, 1985, 1995, 1998, 2001 12 1936, 1966, 1968, 1975, 1977, 1986, 1988, 1990, 1994, 2000, 2007, 2017
4 Colours of Galway.svg Galway 13 1983, 1992, 1994, 1999, 2000, 2004, 2005, 2009, 2011, 2015, 2017, 2018, 2019 20 1931, 1933, 1941, 1947, 1951, 1955, 1958, 1970, 1973, 1981, 1982, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2001, 2003, 2006, 2008, 2013
5 Colours of Dublin.svg Dublin 4 1945, 1946, 1954, 1965 6 1928, 1952, 1953, 1983, 2011, 2012
6 Colours of Leinster Council.svg Limerick 3 1940, 1958, 1984 5 1963, 1965, 2005, 2014, 2016
Colours of Wexford.svg Wexford 3 1963, 1966, 1968 3 1967, 1980, 1985
Colours of Monaghan.svg Waterford 3 1929, 1948, 2013 1 1992
Colours of Offaly.svg Offaly 3 1986, 1987, 1989
7 Colours of Clare.svg Clare 1 1997 2 1989, 2010
8 Colours of Laois.svg Laois 2 1934, 1964
Colours of Leitrim.svg Meath 1 1929
Colours of Antrim.svg Antrim 1 1940

List of All-Ireland Finals[edit]

Recent finals[edit]

Year Winners Score Runners-up Score Venue Winning Captain Ref
1966
(R)
Wexford 6–7 (25)
6–7 (25)
Cork 6–7 (25)
1–8 (11)
Croke Park
Croke Park
Pat Bernie
1967 Cork 2–15 (21) Wexford 5–3 (18) Croke Park Pat Moylan
1968 Wexford 2–13 (19) Cork 3–7 (16) Croke Park Tom Byrne
1969 Cork 2–15 (21) Kilkenny 3–6 (15) Croke Park Seán Collins
1970 Cork 5–19 (34) Galway 2–9 (15) Croke Park Pat Kavanagh
1971 Cork 2–11 (17) Kilkenny 1–11 (14) Croke Park Séamus Coughlan
1972 Kilkenny 8–7 (31) Cork 3–9 (18) Croke Park Brian Cody
1973 Kilkenny 4–5 (17) Galway 3–7 (16) Croke Park Kevin Robinson
1974 Cork 1–10 (13) Kilkenny 1–8 (11) Croke Park Billy Geaney
1975 Kilkenny 3–19 (28) Cork 1–14 (17) Croke Park Harry Ryan
1976 Tipperary 2–20 (26) Kilkenny 1–7 (10) Croke Park Joe Hogan
1977
(R)
Kilkenny 4–8 (20)
1–8 (11)
Cork 3–11 (20)
0–9 (9)
Croke Park
.
Seán Fennelly
1978 Cork 1–15 (18) Kilkenny 1–8 (11) Croke Park P. Murphy
1979 Cork 2–11 (17) Kilkenny 1–9 (12) Croke Park Christy Coughlan
1980 Tipperary 2–15 (21) Wexford 1–10 (13) Croke Park Jim Maher
1981 Kilkenny 1–20 (23) Galway 3–9 (18) Croke Park E. Kennedy
1982 Tipperary 2–7 (13) Galway 0–4 (4) Croke Park John Kennedy
1983 Galway 0–10 (10) Dublin 0–7 (7) Croke Park Anthony Cunningham
1984
(R)
Limerick 1–14 (17)
2–5 (11)
Kilkenny 3–8 (17)
2–4 (10)
Semple Stadium
Semple Stadium
Anthony O'Riordan
1985 Cork 3–10 (19) Wexford 0–12 (12) Croke Park M. O'Mahony
1986 Offaly 3–12 (21) Cork 3–9 (18) Croke Park M. Hogan
1987 Offaly 2–8 (14) Tipperary 0–12 (12) Croke Park T. Moylan
1988 Kilkenny 3–13 (22) Cork 0–12 (12) Croke Park Patsy Brophy
1989 Offaly 2–16 (22) Clare 1–12 (15) Croke Park Brian Whelahan
1990
(R)
Kilkenny 3–14 (23)
3–16 (25)
Cork 3–14 (23)
1–11 (14)
Croke Park
Semple Stadium
James McDermott
1991 Kilkenny 0–15 (15) Tipperary 1–10 (13) Croke Park D. O'Neill
1992 Galway 1–13 (16) Waterford 2–4 (10) Croke Park Conor O'Donovan
1993 Kilkenny 1–17 (20) Galway 1–12 (15) Croke Park S. Doyle
1994 Galway 2–10 (16) Cork 1–11 (14) Croke Park Greg Kennedy
1995 Cork 2–10 (16) Kilkenny 1–2 (5) Croke Park Brian O'Keeffe
1996
(R)
Tipperary 0–20 (20)
2–14 (20)
Galway 3–11 (20)
2–12 (18)
Croke Park
Croke Park
William Maher
1997 Clare 1–11 (14) Galway 1–9 (12) Croke Park John Reddan
1998 Cork 2–15 (21) Kilkenny 1–9 (12) Croke Park Cathal McCarthy
1999 Galway 0–13 (13) Tipperary 0–10 (10) Croke Park John Culkin
2000 Galway 2–19 (25) Cork 4–10 (22) Croke Park Richie Murray
2001 Cork 2–10 (16) Galway 1–8 (11) Croke Park Tomás O'Leary
2002 Kilkenny 3–15 (25) Tipperary 1–7 (10) Croke Park Michael Rice
2003 Kilkenny 2–16 (22) Galway 2–15 (21) Croke Park Richie Power
2004
(R)
Galway 3–12 (21)
0–16 (16)
Kilkenny 1–18 (21)
1–12 (15)
Croke Park
O'Connor Park
John Lee
2005 Galway 3–12 (21) Limerick 0–17 (17) Croke Park Andrew Keary
2006 Tipperary 2–18 (24) Galway 2–7 (13) Croke Park Joey McLoughney
2007 Tipperary 3–14 (23) Cork 2–11 (17) Croke Park Brendan Maher
2008 Kilkenny 3–6 (15) Galway 0–13 (13) Croke Park Thomas Breen
2009 Galway 2–15 (21) Kilkenny 2–11 (17) Croke Park Richie Cummins
2010 Kilkenny 2–10 (16) Clare 0–14 (14) Croke Park Cillian Buckley
2011 Galway 1–21 (24) Dublin 1–12 (15) Croke Park Shane Moloney
2012 Tipperary 2–13 (19)
2–18 (24)
Dublin 1–16 (19)
1–12 (15)
Croke Park Bill Maher [6]
2013 Waterford 1–21 (24) Galway 0–16 (16) Croke Park Kevin Daly [7]
2014 Kilkenny 2–17 (23) Limerick 0–19 (19) Croke Park Darragh Joyce [8]
2015 Galway 4–13 (25) Tipperary 1–16 (19) Croke Park Seán Loftus [9]
2016 Tipperary 1–21 (24) Limerick 0–17 (17) Croke Park Brian McGrath [10]
2017 Galway 2–17 (23) Cork 2–15 (21) Croke Park Darren Morrissey [11]
2018 Galway 0–21 (21) Kilkenny 0–14 (14) Croke Park Seán Neary [12]
2019 Galway 3–14 (23) Kilkenny 0–12 (12) Croke Park Ian McGlynn

All-time record[edit]

Year Winner Opponent
1965 Dublin 4–10 Limerick 2–7
1964 Cork 10–7 Laois 1–4
1963 Wexford 6–12 Limerick 5–9
1962 Kilkenny 3–6 Tipperary 0–9
1961 Kilkenny 3–13 Tipperary 0–15
1960 Kilkenny 7–12 Tipperary 1–11
1959 Tipperary 2–8 Kilkenny 2–7
1958 Limerick 5–8 Galway 3–10
1957 Tipperary 4–7 Kilkenny 3–7
1956 Tipperary 4–16 Kilkenny 1–5
1955 Tipperary 5–15 Galway 2–5
1954 Dublin 2–7 Tipperary 2–3
1953 Tipperary 8–6 Dublin 3–6
1952 Tipperary 9–9 Dublin 2–3
1951 Cork 4–5 Galway 1–8
1950 Kilkenny 3–4 Tipperary 1–5
1949 Tipperary 6–5 Kilkenny 2–4
1948 Waterford 3–8 Kilkenny 4–2
1947 Tipperary 9–5 Galway 1–5
1946 Dublin 1–6 Tipperary 0–7
1945 Dublin 3–14 Tipperary 4–6
1944 Suspended
1943 Suspended
1942 Suspended
1941 Cork 3–11 Galway 1–1
1940 Limerick 6–4 Antrim 2–4
1939 Cork 5–2 Kilkenny 2–2
1938 Cork 7–2 Kilkenny 5–4
1937 Cork 8–5 Kilkenny 2–7
1936 Kilkenny 2–4 Cork 2–3
1935 Kilkenny 4–2 Tipperary 3–3
1934 Tipperary 4–3 Laois 3–5
1933 Tipperary 4–6 Galway 2–3
1932 Tipperary 8–6 Kilkenny 5–1
1931 Kilkenny 4–7 Galway 2–3
1930 Tipperary 4–1 Kilkenny 2–1
1929 Waterford 5–0 Meath 1–1
1928 Cork 1–8 7–6 (R) Dublin 3–2 4–0 (R)

Managers[edit]

Managers in the All-Ireland Championship are involved in the day-to-day running of the team, including the training, team selection, and sourcing of players from the club championships. Their influence varies from county-to-county and is related to the individual county boards. The manager is assisted by a team of two or three selectors and an extensive backroom team consisting of various coaches. Prior to the development of the concept of a manager in the 1970s, teams were usually managed by a team of selectors with one member acting as chairman.

Winning managers
Manager Team Wins Winning years
Colours of Cork.svg Michael O'Brien Cork 6 1969, 1970, 1971, 1974, 1978, 1979
Colours of Galway.svg Mattie Murphy Galway 6 1992, 1994, 2004, 2005, 2009, 2011
Colours of Kilkenny.svg Liam Barron Kilkenny 3 1990, 1991, 1993
Colours of Galway.svg Jeffrey Lynskey Galway 3 2015, 2017, 2018
Colours of Offaly.svg Pad Joe Whelehan Offaly 2 1986, 1987
Colours of Galway.svg John Hardiman Galway 2 1999, 2000
Colours of Kilkenny.svg Richie Mulrooney Kilkenny 2 2008, 2010
Colours of Cork.svg Johnny Clifford Cork 1 1985
Colours of Kilkenny.svg Brendan O'Sullivan Kilkenny 1 1988
Colours of Offaly.svg Pat Moylan Offaly 1 1989
Colours of Cork.svg Jimmy Barry-Murphy Cork 1 1995
Colours of Roscommon.svg Dinny Cahill Tipperary 1 1996
Colours of Clare.svg Kevin Kennedy Clare 1 1997
Colours of Cork.svg Denis Burns Cork 1 1998
Colours of Cork.svg John Considine Cork 1 2001
Colours of Kilkenny.svg Nicky Cashin Kilkenny 1 2002
Colours of Kilkenny.svg Damien Brennan Kilkenny 1 2003
Colours of Roscommon.svg Liam Sheedy Tipperary 1 2006
Colours of Roscommon.svg Declan Ryan Tipperary 1 2007
Colours of Roscommon.svg William Maher Tipperary 1 2012
Colours of Monaghan.svg Seán Power Waterford 1 2013
Colours of Leinster Council.svg Brian Ryan Limerick 1 2014
Colours of Roscommon.svg Liam Cahill Tipperary 1 2016
Colours of Galway.svg Brian Hanley Galway 1 2019

Records and statistics[edit]

By decade[edit]

The most successful team of each decade, judged by number of All-Ireland Minor Hurling Championship titles, is as follows:

  • 1920s: 1 each for Cork (1928) and Waterford (1929)
  • 1930s: 4 for Tipperary (1930-32-33-34)
  • 1940s: 2 for Tipperary (1947-49)
  • 1950s: 6 for Tipperary (1952-53-55-56-57-59)
  • 1960s: 3 each for Kilkenny (1960-61-62), Wexford (1963-66-68) and Cork (1964-67-69)
  • 1970s: 5 for Cork (1970-71-74-78-79)
  • 1980s: 3 for Offaly (1986-87-89)
  • 1990s: 3 for Kilkenny (1990-91-93) and Galway (1992-94-99)
  • 2000s: 4 for Galway (2000-04-05-09)
  • 2010s: 5 for Galway (2011-15-17-18-19)

Gaps[edit]

Longest gaps between successive All-Ireland titles:

  • 65 years: Waterford (1948-2013)
  • 26 years: Limerick (1958-1984)
  • 19 years: Waterford (1929-1948)
  • 18 years: Limerick (1940-1958)
  • 17 years: Tipperary (1959-1976)
  • 14 years: Kilkenny (1936-1950)
  • 14 years: Tipperary (1982-1996)
  • 13 years: Tipperary (1934-1947)
  • 13 years: Cork (1951-1964)
  • 11 years: Dublin (1954-1965)

Top scorers[edit]

By year[edit]

Year Top scorer Team Score Total
1986 Dan O'Connell Cork 9-02 29
1987 Declan Pilkington Offaly 2-28 34
1988 Brian Cunningham Cork 3-29 38
1989 Johnny Dooley Offaly
1990 Damien Fleming Cork 7-27 48
1991 P. J. Delaney Kilkenny 2-29 35
1992 Paul Flynn Waterford 6-25 43
1993 Ollie O'Connor Kilkenny 5-35 50
1994 Brian O'Driscoll Cork 0-26 26
1995 Stephen Phillips Dublin 2-24 30
1996 Eugene O'Neill Tipperary 3-48 57
1997 Henry Shefflin Kilkenny 5-20 35
1998 Leon O'Connell Wexford 3-37 46
1999 Eoin Kelly Tipperary 1-21 24
2000 Brian Carroll Offaly 2-39 45
2001 Kieran Murphy Cork 5-38 53
2002 Richard Flynn Wexford 4-23 35
2003 Richie Power Kilkenny 1-29 32
2004 Darragh Hickey Tipperary 4-29 41
2005 Eoin Ryan Limerick 4-40 52
2006 Richie Hogan Kilkenny 5-38 53
2007 Ryan Clifford Cork 5-30 45
2008 Michael O'Hanlon Wexford 3-37 46
2009 John O'Dwyer Tipperary 4-37 49
2010 Niall Arthur Clare 0-50 50
2011 Mattie Lennon Armagh 4-25 37
2012 Bobby Duggan Clare 3-49 58
2013 Patrick Curran Waterford 3-56 65
2014 Alan Murphy Kilkenny 3-46 55
2015 Andrew Gaffney Kilkenny 1-38 41
2016 Rory O'Connor Wexford 3-33 39
2017 Brian Turnbull Cork 1-51 54
2018 Conor Kelly Kilkenny 2-72 78
2019 Billy Drennan Kilkenny 2-66 72

In finals[edit]

Final Top scorer Team Score Total
2012 John McGrath Limerick 1-11 14
2013 Patrick Curran Waterford 1-07 10
2014 John Walsh Kilkenny 2-05 11
2015 Evan Niland Galway 0-09 9
2016 Brian Ryan Limerick 0-11 11
2017 Jack Canning Galway 2-02 10
Brian Turnbull Cork 1-07
2018 Donal O'Shea Galway 0-10 10
2019 Seán McDonagh Galway 2-08 14

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Electric Ireland MHC Final: Impressive Galway triumph". GAA website. 18 August 2019. Retrieved 3 September 2019.
  2. ^ O'Riordan, Ian (23 January 2008). "Merge needs simple majority". Irish Times. Retrieved 15 July 2015.
  3. ^ "GAA delegates reject U-19 proposal". RTÉ Sport. 26 January 2008. Retrieved 15 July 2015.
  4. ^ Fogarty, John (27 February 2016). "County minor grade set to change from U18 to U17". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 15 July 2016.
  5. ^ Hurley, Denis (14 July 2012). "What's in a name? Trophies reveal intriguing histories". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 25 January 2017.
  6. ^ "Winters digs out Dubs". Irish Examiner. 10 September 2012. Retrieved 10 September 2012.
  7. ^ Fennessy, Paul (8 September 2013). "Waterford end 65-year wait for All-Ireland minor title". The 42. Retrieved 30 July 2018.
  8. ^ "Majestic John Walsh inspires Kilkenny to a 21st minor title". Irish Independent. 8 September 2014. Retrieved 10 September 2014.
  9. ^ "Jeffrey Lynskey's young Galway confound critics". Irish Examiner. 7 September 2015. Retrieved 8 September 2015.
  10. ^ "Redemption as powerful Premier get hands on cup". Irish Examiner. 4 September 2016. Retrieved 6 September 2016.
  11. ^ "Galway youngsters add to the silverware". Irish Examiner. 4 September 2017. Retrieved 6 September 2017.
  12. ^ "Perfect start to the day for Galway as minors collect third All-Ireland hurling crown in four years". The 42. 19 August 2018. Retrieved 31 August 2018.

External links[edit]