Allan Langdon McDermott

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Allan Langdon McDermott
Allan Langdon McDermott (New Jersey Congressman).jpg
From the October 4, 1896, issue of The Philadelphia Inquirer
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Jersey's 10th district
In office
March 4, 1903 – March 3, 1907
Preceded byDistrict created
Succeeded byJames A. Hamill
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Jersey's 7th district
In office
December 3, 1900 – March 3, 1903
Preceded byWilliam Davis Daly
Succeeded byRichard W. Parker
Personal details
Born(1854-03-30)March 30, 1854
South Boston, Massachusetts
DiedOctober 26, 1908(1908-10-26) (aged 54)
Jersey City, New Jersey
Political partyDemocratic

Allan Langdon McDermott (March 30, 1854 – October 26, 1908) was an American Democratic Party politician who represented New Jersey's 7th congressional district from 1900 to 1903, and the 10th district from 1903 to 1907.

Early life[edit]

McDermott was born in South Boston, Massachusetts, on March 30, 1854, to a Scottish family.[1] He attended the local schools, and was trained as a printer.[2] He worked as a newspaper reporter for several years, and then began to study law with Leon Abbett.[3] He graduated from the law department of University of the City of New York (now New York University School of Law).[4] He was admitted to the bar in November 1877, and commenced practice in Jersey City, New Jersey.[5]

Career[edit]

McDermott was corporation attorney for Jersey City from 1879-1883.[6] He was a member of the New Jersey General Assembly in 1880 and 1881,[7] and served as a district court judge from 1883 to 1886.[8] He was the president of the Jersey City Board of Finance and Taxation from 1883 to 1886.[9] He was a member of the State Board of Taxation from 1884 to 1886, chairman of the New Jersey State Democratic Committee from 1885 to 1895, and a member of the commission to revise the constitution of New Jersey in 1894.[10] He was a candidate of the Democratic legislative caucus for United States Senator in 1895 and 1902.[11] He was a delegate at large to the Democratic National Convention in 1896.[12] He was a member of the New Jersey Senate in 1899 and 1900.[13]

He was elected as a Democrat to the Fifty-sixth Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the death of William D. Daly.[14] He was reelected to the Fifty-seventh, Fifty-eighth, and Fifty-ninth Congresses and served from December 3, 1900, to March 3, 1907. He was not a candidate for renomination in 1906.[15]

Death and burial[edit]

McDermott died in Jersey City on October 26, 1908,[16] and is buried in Hoboken Cemetery, North Bergen, New Jersey.[17]

Family[edit]

McDermott was married to Margaret O'Neill. They were the parents of a son, Walter, and a daughter, Aileen.[18]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fitzgerald, Thomas F. (1905). Manual of the Legislature of New Jersey. Trenton, NJ: J. L. Murphy Pub. Co. pp. 289–290.
  2. ^ "Obituary, Mr. Allan Langdon M'Dermott". The New Jersey Law Journal. Plainfield, NJ: New Jersey Law Journal Publishing Company: 350. 1908.
  3. ^ The New Jersey Law Journal
  4. ^ Manual of the Legislature of New Jersey
  5. ^ Manual of the Legislature of New Jersey
  6. ^ Manual of the Legislature of New Jersey
  7. ^ Manual of the Legislature of New Jersey
  8. ^ Manual of the Legislature of New Jersey
  9. ^ Manual of the Legislature of New Jersey
  10. ^ Manual of the Legislature of New Jersey
  11. ^ Manual of the Legislature of New Jersey
  12. ^ Manual of the Legislature of New Jersey
  13. ^ Manual of the Legislature of New Jersey
  14. ^ Manual of the Legislature of New Jersey
  15. ^ "Allan McDermott to Quit". New York Times. New York, NY. January 26, 1906. p. 1.
  16. ^ The New Jersey Law Journal
  17. ^ Spencer, Thomas E. (1998). Where They're Buried. Baltimore, MD: Clearfield Company. p. 227. ISBN 978-0-8063-4823-0.
  18. ^ The New Jersey Law Journal

External links[edit]

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
William D. Daly
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Jersey's 7th congressional district

December 3, 1900 – March 3, 1903
Succeeded by
Richard W. Parker
Preceded by
New District
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Jersey's 10th congressional district

March 4, 1903 – March 3, 1907
Succeeded by
James A. Hamill