Anne Clarke (archaeologist)

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Professor

Anne (Annie) Clarke
Academic background
Alma materAustralian National University
ThesisWinds of Change: an archaeology of contact in the Groote Eylandt Archipelago, Northern Territory.
Academic work
InstitutionsUniversity of Sydney

Anne (Annie) Clarke is an Australian archaeologist and heritage specialist. She is a Professor of archaeology and heritage at the University of Sydney. Clarke is a leading scholar in Australian archaeology, both historical and Aboriginal, as well as critical heritage studies. She has specialisms in archaeobotany, contact archaeology and rock art.

Education[edit]

Clarke obtained a BA (hons) from the Institute of Archaeology, University of London in 1980. In 1989 she obtained a MA from the University of Western Australia with a thesis titled An Analysis of Archaeobotanical Data from Two Sites in Kakadu National Park, Northern Territory.[1] She obtained a PhD in 1996 from the Australian National University, supervised by Rhys Jones, Mike Smith and Matthew Spriggs. Her thesis, titled Winds of Change: an archaeology of contact in the Groote Eylandt Archipelago, Northern Territory explored the dynamics of contact and colonialism between Indigenous people living in the Groote Eylandt archipelago, Macassan traders and later European colonists.[2] It also represented and early model of engaged, community archaeology, as Clarke carried out her fieldwork in collaboration with the local Aboriginal communities of Groote Eylandt.[3][4]

Career[edit]

After completing her PhD, Clarke was employed by the Australian National University, first as a post-doctoral fellow and lecturer. In 2003, she was appointed as a lecturer in heritage studies at the University of Sydney.[5] Over the course of her career, Clarke has held a number of grants, including a large number of Australian Research Council Linkage projects. From 2006-2009, Clarke (along with colleagues Robin Torrence of the Australian Museum and Jude Philp of the Macleay Museum) directed the ARC-funded "Producers and Collectors: Uncovering the Role of Indigenous Agency in the Formation of Museum Collections".[6] From 2012-2015 she was lead Chief Investigator on the project "The archaeology and history of quarantine"[7] that investigated the Sydney Quarantine Station at North Head. She is currently involved with two ARC Linkage projects: "Reconstructing museum specimen data through the pathways of global commerce" led by Jude Philp and "Heritage of the air: how aviation transformed Australia" led by Tracey Ireland of the University of Canberra.[8][9] For the latter project, she is analysing material culture related to aviation held in a number of collections, including by Qantas and the SFO Museum[10] at San Francisco Airport.[11]

Clarke is best known for her work on the archaeology of cross-cultural exchange, community archaeology and cultural heritage. Her work on Groote Eylandt focussed scholarly attention on paintings of Macassan praus in Aboriginal Australian rock art.[2][12] She applied these methods to the study of graffiti made at the Sydney Quarantine Station by people interned there in the 19th and 20th centuries.[13][14][15] This research led to the 2016 publication of the book Stories from the sandstone: quarantine inscriptions from Australia's immigrant past (co-authored with Peter Hobbins and Ursula Frederick)[16][17] that won the NSW community and regional history prize at the 2017 NSW Premier's History Awards.[18] In recent years, Clarke has returned to Groot Eylandt where she has been working with the local community to develop educational programs, repatriation protocols and future archaeological research projects.[19]

Selected publications[edit]

Books[edit]

Articles and book chapters[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Clarke, Anne Fiona. (1987). An analysis of archaeobotanical data from two sites in Kakadu National Park, Northern Territory. (Unpublished MA thesis)
  2. ^ a b Clarke, Anne Fiona (1994). "Winds of change: an archaeology of contact in the Groote Eylandt archipelego, Northern Australia". doi:10.25911/5d78d6ccc6242. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  3. ^ Clarke, Anne (2002). "The Ideal and the Real: Cultural and Personal Transformations of Archaeological Research on Groote Eylandt, Northern Australia". World Archaeology. 34 (2): 249–264. doi:10.1080/0043824022000007080. ISSN 0043-8243. JSTOR 827911. S2CID 18913209.
  4. ^ "Archaeologists to uncover more island history | Anindilyakwa Land Council". anindilyakwa.com.au. Retrieved 2020-10-20.
  5. ^ "Staff Profile". The University of Sydney. Retrieved 2020-10-16.
  6. ^ "Producers and Collectors: Uncovering the Role of Indigenous Agency in the Formation of Museum Collections". Research Data Australia. Retrieved 2020-10-20.
  7. ^ "Linkage Projects - Grant ID: LP120200259". Research Data Australia. Retrieved 2020-10-20.
  8. ^ "Merchants and Museums: Reconstructing museum specimen data through the pathways of global commerce | CASS". www.uowblogs.com. Retrieved 2020-10-20.
  9. ^ "Heritage of the Air". Heritage of the Air. Retrieved 2020-10-20.
  10. ^ SFO Museum
  11. ^ "Annie Clarke". Heritage of the Air. Retrieved 2020-10-20.
  12. ^ Clarke, Anne (2000). "Time, Tradition and Transformation: the archaeology of intercultural encounters on Groote Eylandt, Northern Australia". In Torrence, Robin; Clarke, Anne (eds.). The Archaeology of Difference: Negotiating cross-cultural engagements in Oceania. London: Routledge. pp. 142–181.
  13. ^ Bowden, Tracy (2013-06-05), Stories set in stone reveal gems from the past, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, retrieved 2020-10-21
  14. ^ "Messages from Quarantine - Archaeology Magazine". www.archaeology.org. Retrieved 2020-10-21.
  15. ^ "Uncovering migrant stories locked in stone". SBS News. Retrieved 2020-10-21.
  16. ^ "Stories from the Sandstone". History Council of New South Wales. 2016-12-11. Retrieved 2020-10-21.
  17. ^ "Trove". trove.nla.gov.au. Retrieved 2020-10-20.
  18. ^ State Library of NSW. "2017 Winner Stories: Stories from the Sandstone Peter Hobbins, Ursula K Frederick and Anne Clarke".
  19. ^ "Repatriating unexpected treasures in Arnhem Land". The University of Sydney. Retrieved 2020-10-21.

External links[edit]