Artemas Ward Jr.

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Artemas Ward Jr.
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 1st district
In office
March 4, 1813 – March 3, 1817
Preceded by Josiah Quincy III
Succeeded by Jonathan Mason
Member of the Massachusetts Senate
In office
1818-1819
Member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives
In office
1796-1800
Personal details
Born (1762-01-09)January 9, 1762
Shrewsbury, Massachusetts
Died October 7, 1847(1847-10-07) (aged 85)
Boston, Massachusetts
Political party Federalist

Artemas Ward Jr. (January 9, 1762 – October 7, 1847), like his father, Artemas Ward, was a United States Representative from Massachusetts. He served in the Thirteenth Congress and Fourteenth Congress (1813–1817). He was a member of the Federalist Party.

Biography[edit]

Ward was born in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts on January 9, 1762. He graduated from Harvard University in 1783, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1783, and practiced in Weston.

From 1796 to 1800, Ward served in the Massachusetts House of Representatives.[1] He moved to Charlestown in 1800, where he continued to practice law.

Ward served in the Massachusetts House of Representatives again in 1811 and, in 1812, was elected to the United States House of Representatives. He was reelected in 1814. He served in the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Congresses (March 4, 1813-March 3, 1817).

Ward served in the Massachusetts State Senate in 1818 and 1819, and was a member of the State constitutional convention in 1820.

From 1820 to 1839 Ward was Chief Justice of Boston's Court of Common Pleas from 1820 to 1839.

He was a member of the Harvard University Board of Overseers from 1810 to 1844.

Ward died in Boston on October 7, 1847. He was buried at Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge.

References[edit]

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Josiah Quincy III
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Massachusetts district 1
March 4, 1813 – March 3, 1817
Succeeded by
Jonathan Mason


  1. ^ Biographical Directory of the United States Congress (http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=W000128)