Australian Greens leadership elections

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The Australian Greens have had four federal leadership elections in their history. On each occasion, a single candidate was elected unopposed.

2005[edit]

2005 Australian Greens
Leadership election
Australian-Greens-stub.svg
29 November 2005
  Bob Brown profile.png
Candidate Bob Brown
1st Round Unopposed

Leader before election

No leader

Elected Leader

Bob Brown

The Greens had their first leadership election on 29 November 2005; prior to this they did not have a party leader, preferring a consultative model of government. At a party conference in Hobart, the Greens announced their intention to formalise their party's structure in anticipation of a growing presence in Federal Parliament. Tasmanian Senator Bob Brown was elected leader unopposed, with Western Australian Senator Rachel Siewert appointed the party's first Whip.[1]

2010 deputy[edit]

2010 Australian Greens
Deputy Leadership election
Australian-Greens-stub.svg
September 2010
  Christine Milne profile.jpg Sarah Hanson-Young.png
Candidate Christine Milne Sarah Hanson-Young
1st Round Won Defeated

Deputy Leader before election

Christine Milne

Elected Deputy Leader

Christine Milne

The Greens had a deputy leadership spill in 2010 following the 2010 Australian federal election.[2] The role was contested by Senator for Tasmania Christine Milne and Senator for South Australia Sarah Hanson-Young.[2] Hanson-Young was critical of the Greens supporting the minority Labor Gillard Government, and wanted the party to negotiate with the Liberal Party, while Milne wished to critically maintain the agreement.[3] The election was won by Christine Milne.[2]

2012[edit]

2012 Australian Greens
Leadership election
Australian-Greens-stub.svg
13 April 2012
  Christine Milne profile.jpg
Candidate Christine Milne
1st Round Unopposed

Leader before election

Bob Brown

Elected Leader

Christine Milne

Brown served as party leader until 13 April 2012, when he announced his retirement from politics.[4] The Greens parliamentary party room was immediately convened to appoint a new leader and deputy leader. Christine Milne, Senator from Tasmania, was elected unopposed to the leadership.[5]

Deputy election[edit]

2012 Australian Greens
Deputy Leadership election
Australian-Greens-stub.svg
September 2010
  AdmbandtJuly2010.jpg Sarah Hanson-Young.png
Candidate Adam Bandt Sarah Hanson-Young
1st Round Won Defeated

Deputy Leader before election

Christine Milne

Elected Deputy Leader

Adam Bandt

The deputy leader seat was contested between Adam Bandt, the member for Melbourne in the House of Representatives, and Sarah Hanson-Young.[6] Bandt became the second Greens MP to be elected to the position of deputy leader of the party, Milne having previously filled the role after its establishment in 2008.[4] The leadership election had no effect on the deal that existed between the governing Gillard Labor Government and the Greens, to which Milne remained a signatory.

2015[edit]

2015 Australian Greens
Leadership election
Australian-Greens-stub.svg
6 May 2015
  Richard Di Natale infobox crop-01-01.png
Candidate Richard Di Natale
1st Round Unopposed

Leader before election

Christine Milne

Elected Leader

Richard Di Natale

On the morning of 6 May 2015, Christine Milne announced on Twitter her resignation from the position of leader of the Greens, prompting a meeting of the Greens' parliamentary party room to fill her replacement.[7] Shortly after her announcement, Victorian Senator Richard Di Natale revealed he would stand as a candidate for the leadership, whilst the media speculated incumbent deputy leader Adam Bandt would seek re-election to the position.[7] At the party room meeting however, Bandt did not seek re-election to the deputy leadership, later saying he was "happy" to hand over the role and instead focus on the birth of his partner's baby.[8] Consequently, the party decided to elect two Senators as co-deputy leaders; Scott Ludlam and Larissa Waters.[9]

Di Natale was elected to the leadership unopposed and he became the first leader of the Australian Greens to represent a state other than Tasmania.[9][10]

2020[edit]

2020 Australian Greens
Leadership election
Australian-Greens-stub.svg
4 February 2020
  Adam-Bandt-2019 (cropped).jpg
Candidate Adam Bandt
1st Round Unopposed

Leader before election

Richard Di Natale

Elected Leader

Adam Bandt

The 2020 Australian Greens leadership election began on 3 February, after incumbent Richard Di Natale announced his resignation as federal leader of the Greens. He also announced his plan to retire from federal parliament in the coming months. On the day of his announcement, Greens MP for the seat of Melbourne Adam Bandt, revealed he would contest the party's leadership.[11] A party-room election for the leadership was held the following day, and Bandt was elected unopposed to the leadership position. He became the first Greens member of the House of Representatives, and not the Senate, to be elected leader.[12]

Deputy election[edit]

2020 Australian Greens
Deputy Leadership election
Australian-Greens-stub.svg
September 2010
  Larissa Waters 2019.png NickMcKim2019.jpg Mehreen-Faruqi-2019.jpg
Candidate Larissa Waters Nick McKim Mehreen Faruqi
1st Round Won Won Defeated

Co-Deputy Leaders before election

Adam Bandt, Rachel Siewert

Elected Co-Deputy Leaders

Larissa Waters, Nick McKim

The positions of co-deputy leaders were also filled at the meeting. Three senators, Nick McKim, Larissa Waters, and Mehreen Faruqi contested the role.[13] Larissa Waters was re-elected to the role, with Nick McKim joining her.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Greens firm up party structure". ABC News. 29 November 2005.
  2. ^ a b c "Brown confirms deputy challenge". The Sydney Morning Herald. 26 October 2010. Retrieved 27 September 2020.
  3. ^ Rundle, Guy (1 February 2014). "The future of the Greens". The Monthly. Retrieved 27 September 2020.
  4. ^ a b "Bob Brown resigns as Greens leader and Senator". The Sydney Morning Herald. 13 April 2012.
  5. ^ "As it happened: Bob Brown resigns as Greens leader". ABC News. 13 April 2012.
  6. ^ Willingham, Richard (13 April 2012). "Deputy post boosts Bandt". The Age. Retrieved 27 September 2020.
  7. ^ a b "As it happened: Greens leader Christine Milne resigns". ABC News. 6 May 2015.
  8. ^ "Greens leadership: There's a whiff of Moscow about this all-smiles change". ABC News. 6 May 2015.
  9. ^ a b "Australian Greens: Richard Di Natale elected new leader after Christine Milne resignation". ABC News. 6 May 2015.
  10. ^ "Richard Di Natale elected Greens leader following Christine Milne resignation". The Sydney Morning Herald. 6 May 2015.
  11. ^ "Richard Di Natale quits as Greens leader". The New Daily. 3 February 2020.
  12. ^ "Adam Bandt elected unopposed as federal Greens leader; Larissa Waters and Nick McKim as deputies". ABC News. 4 February 2020.
  13. ^ "Adam Bandt elected as new federal Greens leader". www.abc.net.au. 3 February 2020. Retrieved 30 August 2020.
  14. ^ "Adam Bandt Wins Greens Leadership Vote To Replace Richard Di Natale". 10 Daily. 4 February 2020.