Boogie rock

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Boogie rock is a style of blues rock music that developed in the late 1960s.[1] Its key feature is a repetitive driving rhythm, which emphasizes the groove.[1] Boogie rock is distinct from the piano-driven boogie-woogie music popular during the 1920s to 1940s.[2]

History[edit]

In 1948, American blues artist John Lee Hooker recorded "Boogie Chillen'", an urban electric blues tune derived from early North Mississippi Hill country blues.[2] The song is dominated by "repeated monochord riff" on guitar, which music writer Cub Koda notes was adapted in the rock era by the American groups Canned Heat for "Fried Hockey Boogie" (1968, Boogie with Canned Heat), Norman Greenbaum for "Spirit in the Sky" (1969, Spirit in the Sky ) and ZZ Top for "La Grange" (1973, Tres Hombres).[3]

In addition to Canned Heat[4] and ZZ Top,[5] music writers have identified boogie rock with groups and musicians such as the Allman Brothers Band,[6] Bachman–Turner Overdrive,[7] Black Oak Arkansas[8] Brownsville Station,[9] Cactus,[10]Doobie Brothers,[11] Foghat,[12] Humble Pie,[13] the J. Geils Band,[14] Grand Funk Railroad,[15] the Guess Who,[16] Little Feat,[17] Lynyrd Skynyrd,[18] Molly Hatchet,[19] Status Quo,[20] George Thorogood,[21] and Johnny Winter.[22]

Malcolm Young explained its influence on AC/DC:

The pub scene ... It was like, "Give us a boogie! Give us a boogie!" So everybody played a boogie ... [W]e used to like Canned Heat from way back, and we would just jam on their stuff, around their ideas, at the time, and we'd put a bit of boogie into our own material.[23]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b AllMusic 2001, p. 2.
  2. ^ a b Palmer 1992, pp. 243–244.
  3. ^ Koda, Cub. "John Lee Hooker: Boogie Chillen' – Review". AllMusic. Retrieved December 12, 2020.
  4. ^ AllMusic 2001, p. 66.
  5. ^ AllMusic 2001, p. 462.
  6. ^ AllMusic 2001, p. 12.
  7. ^ AllMusic 2001, p. 18.
  8. ^ Deming, Mark. "Black Oak Arkansas – Biography". AllMusic. Retrieved January 7, 2021. Black Oak Arkansas put a tough, gritty spin on the high-volume hard rock boogie that was popular in the early to mid-'70s.
  9. ^ AllMusic 2001, p. 58.
  10. ^ Jim, Newsom. "Cactus: Biography". AllMusic. Retrieved January 7, 2021. Cactus, a generic boogie band
  11. ^ AllMusic 2001, p. 123.
  12. ^ AllMusic 2001, p. 457.
  13. ^ AllMusic 2001, p. 194.
  14. ^ AllMusic 2001, p. 168.
  15. ^ AllMusic 2001, p. 173.
  16. ^ AllMusic 2001, p. 176.
  17. ^ AllMusic 2001, p. 235.
  18. ^ AllMusic 2001, p. 243.
  19. ^ Huey, Steve. "Molly Hatchet – Biography". AllMusic. Retrieved January 7, 2021. Molly Hatchet melded loud hard-rock boogie
  20. ^ AllMusic 2001, p. 388.
  21. ^ AllMusic 2001, p. 414.
  22. ^ AllMusic 2001, p. 445.
  23. ^ Popoff 2004, p. 150.

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]