Boston Camerata

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The Boston Camerata is an early music ensemble based in Boston, Massachusetts. It was founded in 1954 by Narcissa Williamson, at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, as an adjunct to that museum's musical instrument collection.[1]

The Camerata incorporated as an independent nonprofit in 1974.[2] It was directed from 1969 to 2008 by Joel Cohen, who remains Music Director Emeritus. Since 2008, the company's artistic director has been French-born singer and scholar Anne Azéma.[3] Azéma and the Camerata produce many new programs, featuring early repertoires which span eight centuries of music history. The Camerata has a regular subscription series for Boston-area residents,[4] as well as tours in the United States[5][6] and abroad.[1][7][8] In 2011, Camerata was in residence in Reims, France, contributing five programs of medieval French music to the 800th anniversary celebration of the Reims Cathedral. Recently, the ensemble has appeared in Paris at the Palais de Chaillot in collaboration with the Tero Saarinen Company of Helsinki, Finland (2014),[9] at the Théatre de Ville during its 60th anniversary season (2015),[10] and at La Philharmonie de Paris (2018).[11] The Night's Tale, Azéma's innovative staged production built around a medieval tournament in France, was first presented in France and Luxembourg in 2007. It has since been performed in Boston to great acclaim in Spring 2016[12] and will tour in the US in 2020.[13] The company's South American début tour took place in Brazil in July, 2016.[14] In 2017 and 2018, the Camerata toured in Switzerland, Holland, and France and Canada and the US Midwest,[15] including a reprise of the Play of Daniel, first presented to Boston audiences in late 2014.[16]

The Camerata's recordings include programs on Harmonia Mundi, Erato, Telefunken, and Warner Classics. Among the ensemble's awards are the Grand Prix du Disque (1987), awarded for a medieval version of the Tristan and Iseult legend.[17] Other media projects include two prizes at FIFA Montréal, 2014.[18] It has undertaken museum and educational projects including a visiting artist residency at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology,[19] Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto,[20] and The Metropolitan Museum Cloisters Concerts.[21] It has collaborated with local choirs, both children and adults.[22][23]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Booking Contact Person:Annie Houston. "Boston Camerata | Early Music America". Earlymusic.org. Archived from the original on 2009-10-29. Retrieved 2010-04-01.
  2. ^ "History". The Boston Camerata. Archived from the original on 2010-05-04. Retrieved 2010-04-01.
  3. ^ Worlds of Music: The Boston Camerata Series Archived March 1, 2010, at the Wayback Machine, Continuing Education, New England Conservatory
  4. ^ Weininger, David (2010-03-08). "Vibrant portraits of two icons in Boston Camerata's 'Maria Monologues' - The Boston Globe". Boston.com. Retrieved 2010-04-01.
  5. ^ Rockwell, John (1983-03-24). "Concert: The Boston Camerata - New York Times". Nytimes.com. Retrieved 2010-04-01.
  6. ^ Hughes, Allen (1985-02-21). "Concert: Boston Camerata Performs - New York Times". Nytimes.com. Retrieved 2010-04-01.
  7. ^ Von Klaus Lipinski am 16. November 2009 17:30 Uhr. "Tage alter Musik in Herne beendet | Ruhr Nachrichten". Ruhrnachrichten.de. Retrieved 2010-04-01.
  8. ^ "Un pont sacré entre religions - Panier". Midi Libre. Retrieved 2010-04-01.[permanent dead link]
  9. ^ "Home". Tero Saarinen Company. Retrieved 2019-10-01.
  10. ^ "Home". Théâtre de la ville de Paris. Retrieved 2019-10-01.
  11. ^ "Philharmonie de Paris". Philharmonie de Paris. Retrieved 2019-10-01.
  12. ^ "Boston Camerata and Longy tell 'The Night's Tale' - The Boston Globe". BostonGlobe.com. Retrieved 2019-10-01.
  13. ^ "MusicalAmerica - Boston Camerata Announces 2019-2020 Tours". www.musicalamerica.com. Retrieved 2019-10-01.
  14. ^ "The Boston Camerata in Brazil » Early Music America". Early Music America. Retrieved 2019-10-01.
  15. ^ "Past Performances". The Boston Camerata. 2014-11-02. Retrieved 2019-10-01.
  16. ^ "Boston Classical Review » Blog Archive » Boston Camerata provides enchanting new take on "The Play of Daniel"". Retrieved 2019-10-01.
  17. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-07-16. Retrieved 2010-03-28.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  18. ^ Wible, Tom (2014-04-03). "SHAKER FILM WITH CAMERATA MUSIC WINS TWO AWARDS". The Boston Camerata. Retrieved 2019-10-01.
  19. ^ "The Boston Camerata". Arts at MIT. Retrieved 2019-10-01.
  20. ^ "Treasures of Devotion: Spiritual Songs in Northern Europe, 1500–1540". Art Gallery of Ontario. Retrieved 2019-10-01.
  21. ^ www.metmuseum.org https://www.metmuseum.org/press/news/2014/cloisters-concerts. Retrieved 2019-10-01. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  22. ^ "St. Paul's School | Chapel Music". www.sps.edu. Retrieved 2019-10-01.
  23. ^ "Help the Children Benefit Concert". memorialchurch.harvard.edu. Retrieved 2019-10-01.

External links[edit]