Boston Courier

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The Boston Courier
TypeDaily newspaper from 1824 to 1866; Weekly newspaper from 1867 to 1915
FoundedMarch 2, 1824
LanguageEnglish
Ceased publicationApril 10, 1915
HeadquartersBoston, Massachusetts

The Boston Courier was an American newspaper based in Boston, Massachusetts. It was founded on March 2, 1824, by Joseph T. Buckingham[1] as a daily newspaper which supported protectionism.[1] Buckingham served as editor until he sold out completely in 1848,[1] after suffering a severe financial crisis in 1837 and losing much of his editorial authority.[2] The Boston Courier supported the National Republicans, and later the Whig Party.[3] In the period before the American Civil War, its editors, including George S. Hillard and George Lunt,[4] supported the states' right position on the abolition of slavery. From 1867 to 1915 the Boston Courier (New Series) was a weekly newspaper published by Libbey & Dennison.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Evert Augustus Duyckinck; George Long Duyckinck, eds. (1856). "Joseph T. Buckingham". Cyclopaedia of American literature. Vol.2. C. Scribner. pp. 19–20.
  2. ^ Howard B. Rock; Paul A. Gilje; Robert Asher, eds. (1995). ""Becoming Joseph T. Buckingham" by Gary J. Kornblith". American artisans: crafting social identity, 1750-1850. JHU Press. p. 133. ISBN 0-8018-5029-0.
  3. ^ Howard B. Rock; Paul A. Gilje; Robert Asher, eds. (1995). ""Spavined Ministers, Lying Toothpullers, and Buggering Priests": Third-Partyism and the Search for Security in the Antebellum North by Bruce Laurie". American artisans: crafting social identity, 1750-1850. JHU Press. pp. 98–122. ISBN 0-8018-5029-0; (See p. 102.)
  4. ^ Lunt, George (1858). Radicalism in religion, philosophy and social life: four papers from the Boston Courier for 1858. Boston: Little, Brown, & Co.
  5. ^ "Boston Courier". LIbrary of Congress Online Catalog.

See also[edit]