Bunazosin

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Bunazosin
Bunazosin.png
Clinical data
AHFS/Drugs.comInternational Drug Names
ATC code
  • none
Identifiers
  • 1-(4-(4-amino-6,7-dimethoxyquinazolin-2-yl)-1,4-diazepan-1-yl)butan-1-one
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
ChEMBL
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC19H27N5O3
Molar mass373.457 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
  • CCCC(=O)N1CCCN(CC1)C2=NC3=CC(=C(C=C3C(=N2)N)OC)OC
  • InChI=1S/C19H27N5O3/c1-4-6-17(25)23-7-5-8-24(10-9-23)19-21-14-12-16(27-3)15(26-2)11-13(14)18(20)22-19/h11-12H,4-10H2,1-3H3,(H2,20,21,22) checkY
  • Key:RHLJLALHBZGAFM-UHFFFAOYSA-N checkY
  (verify)

Bunazosin (INN) is an alpha 1 antagonist.[1] Bunazosin was initially developed to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). It has been approved in Japan in a topical form to treat glaucoma. The mechanism of action is a reduction of aqueous outflow through the uveoscleral pathway resulting in lowering the intraocular pressure. It also may act to improve blood flow to the ocular nerve. Systemic Alpha-1 adrenergic receptor antagonists have been implicated in Intraoperative Floppy Iris Syndrome (IFIS). Bunazosin potentially could have the same effect but there has been no research to substantiate this as a risk for cataract surgery.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Weidinger G (November 1995). "Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties and therapeutic use of bunazosin in hypertension. A review". Arzneimittel-Forschung. 45 (11): 1166–71. PMID 8929232.