CD79B

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CD79B
Available structures
PDBOrtholog search: PDBe RCSB
Identifiers
AliasesCD79B, AGM6, B29, IGB, CD79b molecule
External IDsOMIM: 147245 MGI: 96431 HomoloGene: 521 GeneCards: CD79B
Gene location (Human)
Chromosome 17 (human)
Chr.Chromosome 17 (human)[1]
Chromosome 17 (human)
Genomic location for CD79B
Genomic location for CD79B
Band17q23.3Start63,928,740 bp[1]
End63,932,354 bp[1]
RNA expression pattern
PBB GE CD79B 205297 s at fs.png
More reference expression data
Orthologs
SpeciesHumanMouse
Entrez
Ensembl
UniProt
RefSeq (mRNA)

NM_000626
NM_001039933
NM_021602
NM_001329050

NM_008339
NM_001313939

RefSeq (protein)

NP_000617
NP_001035022
NP_001315979
NP_067613

NP_001300868
NP_032365

Location (UCSC)Chr 17: 63.93 – 63.93 Mbn/a
PubMed search[2][3]
Wikidata
View/Edit HumanView/Edit Mouse

CD79b molecule, immunoglobulin-associated beta, also known as CD79B (Cluster of Differentiation 79B), is a human gene.[4]

It is associated with agammaglobulinemia-6.

The B lymphocyte antigen receptor is a multimeric complex that includes the antigen-specific component, surface immunoglobulin (Ig). Surface Ig non-covalently associates with two other proteins, Ig-alpha and Ig-beta, which are necessary for expression and function of the B-cell antigen receptor. This gene encodes the Ig-beta protein of the B-cell antigen component. Alternatively spliced transcript variants encoding different isoforms have been described.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ENSG00000007312 - Ensembl, May 2017
  2. ^ "Human PubMed Reference:". National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  3. ^ "Mouse PubMed Reference:". National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  4. ^ a b "Entrez Gene: CD79B CD79b molecule, immunoglobulin-associated beta".

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]


This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.