COVID-19 pandemic in Kentucky

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COVID-19 pandemic in Kentucky
Kentucky National Guard (49678011562).jpg
Members of the Kentucky National Guard assist in providing medical supplies
COVID-19 Prevalence in Kentucky by county.svg
Map of the outbreak in Kentucky by total confirmed infections per 100,000 people (as of August 4)
  3,000+ confirmed infected
  1,000–3,000 confirmed infected
  300–1,000 confirmed infected
  100–300 confirmed infected
  30–100 confirmed infected
  0–30 confirmed infected
  No confirmed infected or no data
DiseaseCOVID-19
Virus strainSARS-CoV-2
LocationKentucky, U.S.
Index caseLexington
Arrival dateMarch 6, 2020
Confirmed cases31,185
Hospitalized cases602 (current)
3,782 (cumulative)
Critical cases128 (current)
1,207 (cumulative)
Recovered8,135
Deaths
742
Government website
govstatus.egov.com/kycovid19

The COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed to have reached the U.S. state of Kentucky on March 6, 2020, when Governor Andy Beshear's office announced the first confirmed case in Lexington and declared a state of emergency to ensure all entities have the necessary response resources. As of August 2, 2020, 31,185 cases of COVID-19 were confirmed, with 742 deaths.

The Kentucky government announced a series of restrictions and recommendations in order to help curb the spread of the disease. Schools, universities, and a range of businesses were broadly closed to the public. Public sporting events were closed or postponed, including the 2020 Kentucky Derby.

A range of initiatives was put into place, many by executive order, including broader leeway for pharmacists, relaxing of standards for unemployment insurance, extensions of Kentucky drivers licenses, the curtailing of non-essential police services in some areas, and moratoriums on evictions and utility shut-offs.[1]

Prevalence[edit]

COVID-19 cases in Kentucky, United States  ()
     Deaths        Recoveries        Active cases

Mar Mar Apr Apr May May Jun Jun Jul Jul Aug Aug Last 15 days Last 15 days

Date
# of cases
# of deaths
2020-03-07
1(n.a.)
2020-03-08
4(+300%)
2020-03-09
6(+50%)
2020-03-10
8(+33%)
2020-03-11
8(=)
2020-03-12
11(+38%)
2020-03-13
14(+27%)
2020-03-14
16(+14%)
2020-03-15
20(+25%)
2020-03-16
22(+10%) 1(n.a.)
2020-03-17
26(+18%) 1(=)
2020-03-18
35(+35%) 1(=)
2020-03-19
40(+14%) 1(=)
2020-03-20
48(+20%) 2(+100%)
2020-03-21
54(+12%) 3(+50%)
2020-03-22
99(+83%) 3(=)
2020-03-23
124(+25%) 4(+33%)
2020-03-24
157(+27%) 4(=)
2020-03-25
198(+26%) 5(+25%)
2020-03-26
248(+25%) 6(+20%)
2020-03-27
302(+22%) 8(+33%)
2020-03-28
394(+30%) 9(+12%)
2020-03-29
439(+11%) 9(=)
2020-03-30
480(+9.3%) 11(+22%)
2020-03-31
594(+24%) 18(+64%)
2020-04-01
670(+13%) 20(+11%)
2020-04-02
770(+15%) 31(+55%)
2020-04-03
831(+7.9%) 37(+19%)
2020-04-04
917(+10%) 40(+8.1%)
2020-04-05
955(+4.1%) 45(+12%)
2020-04-06
1,008(+5.5%) 59(+31%)
2020-04-07
1,149(+14%) 65(+10%)
2020-04-08
1,346(+17%) 73(+12%)
2020-04-09
1,452(+7.9%) 79(+8.2%)
2020-04-10
1,693(+17%) 90(+14%)
2020-04-11
1,840(+8.7%) 94(+4.4%)
2020-04-12
1,963(+6.7%) 97(+3.2%)
2020-04-13
2,048(+4.3%) 104(+7.2%)
2020-04-14
2,210(+7.9%) 115(+11%)
2020-04-15
2,291(+3.7%) 122(+6.1%)
2020-04-16
2,429(+6%) 129(+5.7%)
2020-04-17
2,522(+3.8%) 137(+6.2%)
2020-04-18
2,707(+7.3%) 144(+5.1%)
2020-04-19
2,960(+9.3%) 148(+2.8%)
2020-04-20
3,050(+3%) 154(+4.1%)
2020-04-21
3,192(+4.7%) 171(+11%)
2020-04-22
3,373(+5.7%) 185(+8.2%)
2020-04-23
3,481(+3.2%) 191(+3.2%)
2020-04-24
3,779(+8.6%) 200(+4.7%)
2020-04-25
3,905(+3.3%) 205(+2.5%)
2020-04-26
4,074(+4.3%) 208(+1.5%)
2020-04-27
4,146(+1.8%) 213(+2.4%)
2020-04-28
4,375(+5.5%) 224(+5.2%)
2020-04-29
4,539(+3.7%) 235(+4.9%)
2020-04-30
4,708(+3.7%) 240(+2.1%)
2020-05-01
4,879(+3.6%) 248(+3.3%)
2020-05-02
5,052(+3.5%) 253(+2%)
2020-05-03
5,130(+1.5%) 253(=)
2020-05-04
5,245(+2.2%) 261(+3.2%)
2020-05-05
5,822(+11%) 275(+5.4%)
2020-05-06
5,934(+1.9%) 283(+2.9%)
2020-05-07
6,128(+3.3%) 294(+3.9%)
2020-05-08
6,288(+2.6%) 298(+1.4%)
2020-05-09
6,440(+2.4%) 304(+2%)
2020-05-10
6,576(+2.1%) 307(+0.99%)
2020-05-11
6,677(+1.5%) 311(+1.3%)
2020-05-12
6,853(+2.6%) 321(+3.2%)
2020-05-13
7,080(+3.3%) 326(+1.6%)
2020-05-14
7,225(+2%) 328(+0.61%)
2020-05-15
7,444(+3%) 332(+1.2%)
2020-05-16
7,688(+3.3%) 334(+0.6%)
2020-05-17
7,810(+1.6%) 337(+0.9%)
2020-05-18
7,935(+1.6%) 346(+2.7%)
2020-05-19
8,069(+1.7%) 366(+5.8%)
2020-05-20
8,167(+1.2%) 376(+2.7%)
2020-05-21
8,286(+1.5%) 386(+2.7%)
2020-05-22
8,426(+1.7%) 391(+1.3%)
2020-05-23
8,571(+1.7%) 391(=)
2020-05-24
8,712(+1.6%) 391(=)
2020-05-25
8,834(+1.4%) 391(=)
2020-05-26
8,951(+1.3%) 394(+0.77%)
2020-05-27
9,077(+1.4%) 400(+1.5%)
2020-05-28
9,184(+1.2%) 409(+2.2%)
2020-05-29
9,464(+3%) 418(+2.2%)
2020-05-30
9,704(+2.5%) 431(+3.1%)
2020-05-31
9,875(+1.8%) 435(+0.93%)
2020-06-01
10,046(+1.7%) 439(+0.92%)
2020-06-02
10,185(+1.4%) 442(+0.68%)
2020-06-03
10,410(+2.2%) 450(+1.8%)
2020-06-04
10,705(+2.8%) 458(+1.8%)
2020-06-05
10,977(+2.5%) 466(+1.7%)
2020-06-06
11,287(+2.8%) 470(+0.86%)
2020-06-07
11,356(+0.61%) 471(+0.21%)
2020-06-08
11,476(+1.1%) 472(+0.21%)
2020-06-09
11,708(+2%) 477(+1.1%)
2020-06-10
11,883(+1.5%) 484(+1.5%)
2020-06-11
11,945(+0.52%) 493(+1.9%)
2020-06-12
12,166(+1.9%) 497(+0.81%)
2020-06-13
12,445(+2.3%) 499(+0.4%)
2020-06-14
12,529(+0.67%) 500(+0.2%)
2020-06-15
12,647(+0.94%) 505(+1%)
2020-06-16
12,829(+1.4%) 512(+1.4%)
2020-06-17
12,995(+1.3%) 518(+1.2%)
2020-06-18
13,197(+1.6%) 521(+0.58%)
2020-06-19
13,454(+1.9%) 522(+0.19%)
2020-06-20
13,630(+1.3%) 524(+0.38%)
2020-06-21
13,750(+0.88%) 526(+0.38%)
2020-06-22
13,839(+0.65%) 526(=)
2020-06-23
14,141(+2.2%) 537(+2.1%)
2020-06-24
14,363(+1.6%) 538(+0.19%)
2020-06-25
14,617(+1.8%) 546(+1.5%)
2020-06-26
14,859(+1.7%) 553(+1.3%)
2020-06-27
15,167(+2.1%) 554(+0.18%)
2020-06-28
15,232(+0.43%) 558(+0.72%)
2020-06-29
15,347(+0.75%) 560(+0.36%)
2020-06-30
15,624(+1.8%) 565(+0.89%)
2020-07-01
15,842(+1.4%) 572(+1.2%)
2020-07-02
16,079(+1.5%) 581(+1.6%)
2020-07-03
16,376(+1.8%) 585(+0.69%)
2020-07-04
16,376(=) 585(=)
2020-07-05
16,884(+3.1%) 585(=)
2020-07-06
17,152(+1.6%) 593(+1.4%)
2020-07-07
17,519(+2.1%) 602(+1.5%)
2020-07-08
17,919(+2.3%) 608(+1%)
2020-07-09
18,245(+1.8%) 612(+0.66%)
2020-07-10
18,670(+2.3%) 620(+1.3%)
2020-07-11
19,121(+2.4%) 622(+0.32%)
2020-07-12
19,389(+1.4%) 625(+0.48%)
2020-07-13
19,653(+1.4%) 629(+0.64%)
2020-07-14
20,223(+2.9%) 635(+0.95%)
2020-07-15
20,677(+2.2%) 645(+1.6%)
2020-07-16
21,083(+2%) 650(+0.78%)
2020-07-17
21,605(+2.5%) 658(+1.2%)
2020-07-18
22,184(+2.7%) 667(+1.4%)
2020-07-19
23,161(+4.4%) 670(+0.45%)
2020-07-20
23,414(+1.1%) 671(+0.15%)
2020-07-21
24,060(+2.8%) 674(+0.45%)
2020-07-22
24,540(+2%) 677(+0.45%)
2020-07-23
25,147(+2.5%) 684(+1%)
2020-07-24
25,931(+3.1%) 691(+1%)
2020-07-25
26,764(+3.2%) 696(+0.72%)
2020-07-26
27,079(+1.2%) 700(+0.57%)
2020-07-27
27,601(+1.9%) 709(+1.3%)
2020-07-28
28,126(+1.9%) 719(+1.4%)
2020-07-29
28,727(+2.1%) 724(+0.7%)
2020-07-30
29,386(+2.3%) 731(+0.97%)
2020-07-31
30,151(+2.6%) 735(+0.55%)
2020-08-01
30,723(+1.9%) 740(+0.68%)
2020-08-02
31,185(+1.5%) 742(+0.27%)
2020-08-03
31,508(+1%) 744(+0.27%)
2020-08-04
32,197(+2.2%) 751(+0.94%)
2020-08-05
32,741(+1.7%) 752(+0.13%)
Cases: The number of cases confirmed in Kentucky.
Sources: kycovid19.ky.gov.

The Kentucky government announced on March 6, 2020 that the state had seen its first confirmed case of the virus, in the city of Lexington. The individual had been placed in isolation in an unidentified medical facility.[2] On the same day a state of emergency was declared.[2]

One resident of Nelson County was forced into isolation when they refused to self-isolate after testing positive for the virus.[3]

In a press conference on March 17, Governor Andy Beshear advised that the first case in Western Kentucky had been confirmed in Lyon County, and one woman had been removed from the list, after it was discovered that she had used a Kentucky address, but was actually a resident of New York.[4] By the same day, around 380 test had been administered in the state in total, with five counties having administrated 15 tests or more.[5] The highest rates of both testing and confined cases were in areas around the urban centers of Louisville and Lexington.[5]

As of March 18, one of the first two patients to test positive for the virus, a 56-year-old man from Montgomery County, had fully recovered and was released from isolation.[6] A total of 35 cases were confirmed, and 489 test had been administered statewide.[5] Among these were an eight-month-old from Jefferson County, reported in good condition and being treated at home.[7]

Impact[edit]

As of March 16, Governor Beshear announced that all bars and restaurants would close to dining.[8] The same day Beshear also announced amendments to the state's unemployment insurance requirements, waiving the seven-day waiting period and requirement for workers to actively seek employment.[9] Plans were announced to implement state laws against price gouging via executive order.[2]

Schools and child care facilities were closed statewide.[10] The University of Kentucky suspended in-person classes for the entirety of the spring semester.[11]

The electricity providers Kentucky Utilities and Louisville Gas & Electric announced it would suspend shut-offs and waive late fees until May 1, 2020.[10][12]

All public facing businesses that encourage public congregation and which cannot comply with the CDC's social distancing guidelines were ordered closed as of March 17.[4] Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer ordered the closure of playgrounds, basketball courts and soccer fields in Louisville's 120 parks on March 24.[13]

Government[edit]

The government announced on March 16 it has applied to the U.S. Small Business Administration for assistance related to the impacts to small businesses. A three-month extension for state drivers licenses was enacted.[10] The state's primary elections were suspended until June 23, 2020.[10]

As of March 11, Kentucky Supreme Court Chief Justice John D. Minton Jr. suspended most state court hearings for one month. Federal court hearings had elsewhere been suspended by Danny C. Reeves, Chief U.S. District Judge.[14] Leaders from the Kentucky General Assembly announced that the 2020 session would continue despite warnings about gathering in large groups. In-person meetings with legislators would be restricted only to essential contacts.[10]

A spokesperson for the Louisville Metro Housing Authority advised that they would suspend evictions and set outs.[10] The Louisville Metro Police Department announced they would no longer be responding to certain calls, including hit-and-run, public intoxication, and disorderly conduct.[15] The Lexington Fire Department enacted a number of steps, including restricting public access to stations, but were still responding to all emergency calls.[16] State Child Protective Services workers were ordered to limit contact with families except in cases of "imminent risk or high risk-only circumstances".[17]

Due to the large number of people filing new claims, the state's system for registering workers for unemployment insurance crashed as of March 17 and remained down as of March 18.[4]

As of March 18, the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet closed all Real ID stations in addition to "all circuit court clerk offices, Kentucky licensing regional field offices, cabinet one-stop shop and cabinet district highway, administrative, maintenance and equipment offices."[18]

As of March 22, there were 103 confirmed cases. Kentucky Senator Rand Paul announced he had tested positive for the virus.[19]

Mayor Greg Fischer of Louisville ordered the closure of playgrounds, basketball courts and soccer fields in the city's parks on March 24.[13]

Due to a surge of cases in Alabama the Kentucky State Government is advising all travelers from the state to self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival.[20]

Healthcare[edit]

On March 17 an executive order was announced allowing pharmacists to issue prescriptions for 30 days if they cannot contact a patient's doctor. It also allowed pharmacists to set up and conduct business in areas not covered by the normal permitting process, to increase the ease and availability of mobile operations.[21] Blood donations were substantially impacted as scheduled blood drives were cancelled and the public took measures to avoid public spaces.[22] Adult daycare centers were ordered closed as of March 17.[4]

Religion[edit]

Initially, religious leaders were upset when Governor Beshear called for all religious services to be halted on March 11, 2020.[23] However, many followed the guideline on Sunday the 14th with even more following by the following Sunday. The Roman Catholic Diocese of Covington suspended public masses from March 20 until further notice.[24]

By April 4, two churches in Hopkins County had been linked to an outbreak with over 50 cases and 4 deaths.[25]

Sports[edit]

In college sports, the National Collegiate Athletic Association canceled all winter and spring tournaments, most notably the Division I men's and women's basketball tournaments, affecting colleges and universities statewide.[26] On March 16, the National Junior College Athletic Association also canceled the remainder of the winter seasons as well as the spring seasons.[27]

The running of the Kentucky Derby, normally scheduled for the first Saturday in May, was postponed until September. This was the first time in 75 years that the race was rescheduled.[28]

Governor's Daily Address[edit]

Governor Beshear has a daily public address at 5:00 pm EDT on the COVID-19 pandemic. The Governor is joined regularly by an ASL interpreter, Kentucky Commission on the Deaf and the Hard of Hearing Executive Director Virginia Moore, and Dr. Steven Stack, Commissioner of the Kentucky Department of Public Health. The Governor has come up with several hashtags he wants Kentuckians to use: #TeamKentucky, #TogetherKy, #HealthyatHome, and #Patriot.[29] Some of the common phrases that the Governor uses during these addresses can be purchased on various items to help raise money for Team Kentucky fund started by the Governor to help those who have been hurt financially by the pandemic.[30] The Governor also asks people to light up their house green whenever there are coronavirus deaths in the state that day to honor those that are lost. As part of this, Beshear has ordered the Governor's Mansion and the State Capitol dome illuminated in green on those nights.[31]

Public response[edit]

Compliance with the Governor's order to wear masks was reported as a "mixed bag" in Louisville.[32] One store in Kentucky denied entry to customers wearing masks.[33][34]

Statistics[edit]

County [a] Cases [b] Deaths Pop. Cases / 100k Ref. & Notes
120 of 120 25,147 684 4,582,040 548.8
Adair 171 19 19,556 874.4
Allen 205 8 21,054 973.7
Anderson 42 1 23,041 182.3
Ballard 26 0 8,142 319.3
Barren 218 2 44,442 490.5
Bath 25 1 12,585 198.6
Bell 191 1 29,172 654.7
Boone 880 23 132,434 664.5
Bourbon 60 1 20,592 291.4
Boyd 132 3 48,304 273.3
Boyle 89 0 30,238 294.3
Bracken 24 0 8,496 282.5
Breathitt 18 0 14,114 127.5
Breckinridge 39 2 20,983 185.9
Bullitt 229 4 82,411 277.9
Butler 284 14 13,065 2,173.7
Caldwell 41 0 12,658 323.9
Calloway 142 2 39,140 362.8
Campbell 435 13 95,768 454.2
Carlisle 16 1 4,930 324.5
Carroll 133 2 11,065 1,202
Carter 76 1 28,094 270.5
Casey 125 8 16,029 779.8
Christian 380 4 77,114 492.8
Clark 122 7 37,037 329.4
Clay 126 4 20,754 607.1
Clinton 14 0 10,371 135
Crittenden 22 1 9,114 241.4
Cumberland 20 0 6,949 287.8
Daviess 608 7 102,392 593.8
Edmonson 86 12 12,807 671.5
Elliott 7 0 8,217 85.2
Estill 8 0 14,655 54.6
Fayette 2,233 42 325,520 686 [c]
Fleming 42 0 14,368 292.3
Floyd 66 1 44,077 149.7
Franklin 200 5 51,531 388.1
Fulton 36 1 6,514 552.7
Gallatin 77 8 8,970 858.4
Garrard 49 0 17,517 279.7
Grant 80 5 25,676 311.6
Graves 411 21 36,820 1,116.2
Grayson 165 11 26,716 617.6
Green 22 1 11,282 195
Greenup 63 0 36,406 173
Hancock 39 0 8,942 436.1
Hardin 404 7 112,050 360.6
Harlan 126 2 31,332 402.1
Harrison 107 0 19,271 555.2
Hart 61 0 19,148 318.6
Henderson 256 4 45,698 560.2
Henry 68 2 16,387 415
Hickman 16 0 4,633 345.3
Hopkins 363 33 46,270 784.5
Jackson 124 14 13,976 887.2
Jefferson 5,635 216 778,244 724.1 [d]
Jessamine 204 0 54,637 373.4
Johnson 18 0 24,955 72.1
Kenton 1,116 37 168,539 662.2
Knott 30 0 16,471 182.1
Knox 147 8 32,834 447.7
LaRue 35 1 14,681 238.4
Laurel 292 4 60,891 479.5
Lawrence 22 0 15,940 138
Lee 3 0 7,305 41.1
Leslie 19 0 11,890 159.8
Letcher 28 0 25,831 108.4
Lewis 27 0 14,552 185.5
Lincoln 75 1 25,112 298.7
Livingston 28 0 9,454 296.2
Logan 282 19 27,738 1,016.7
Lyon 26 3 8,412 309.1
Madison 295 1 92,453 319.1
Magoffin 10 0 14,644 68.3
Marion 86 0 19,716 436.2
Marshall 100 2 32,557 307.2
Martin 20 0 12,151 164.6
Mason 45 1 17,620 255.4
McCracken 270 3 66,704 404.8
McCreary 21 0 19,246 109.1
McLean 35 1 9,815 356.6
Meade 55 2 29,263 188
Menifee 19 0 6,559 289.7
Mercer 36 0 22,148 162.5
Metcalfe 20 2 10,337 193.5
Monroe 70 2 10,856 644.8
Montgomery 92 0 28,162 326.7
Morgan 24 0 13,714 175
Muhlenberg 586 9 31,018 1,889.2
Nelson 162 2 46,738 346.6
Nicholas 17 0 7,258 234.2
Ohio 310 3 24,597 1,260.3
Oldham 445 8 67,892 655.5
Owen 25 0 11,178 223.7
Owsley 5 0 4,724 105.8
Pendleton 28 0 15,024 186.4
Perry 144 2 30,914 465.8
Pike 173 3 68,341 253.1
Powell 30 0 12,661 236.9
Pulaski 164 2 65,166 251.7
Robertson 2 0 2,230 89.7
Rockcastle 44 0 16,967 259.3
Rowan 46 0 25,007 183.9
Russell 79 5 18,323 431.2
Scott 205 0 57,532 356.3
Shelby 639 22 48,584 1,315.2
Simpson 115 5 18,443 623.5
Spencer 65 0 19,128 339.8
Taylor 73 1 25,556 285.6
Todd 30 0 12,732 235.6
Trigg 44 0 14,886 295.6
Trimble 25 0 8,637 289.5
Union 42 0 14,734 285.1
Warren 2,105 19 133,362 1,578.4
Washington 45 0 12,243 367.6
Wayne 44 0 20,734 212.2
Webster 71 1 13,480 526.7
Whitley 82 1 37,059 221.3
Wolfe 7 0 7,468 93.7
Woodford 104 0 27,166 382.8
Unconfirmed 4 0
Updated Jul 23, 2020
Data is publicly reported by Kentucky Department of Public Health[35][36]
  1. ^ County where individuals with a positive case diagnosed, not where they were reside. Location of original infection may vary.
  2. ^ Reported cases includes presumptive and confirmed case. Actual case numbers are probably higher.
  3. ^ Consolidated city-county; Lexington-Fayette Urban County
  4. ^ Consolidated city-county; Louisville/Jefferson County Metro Government

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Governor of Kentucky. (March 25, 2020). "Executive order 2020-257" (PDF).
  2. ^ a b c "Officials Confirm State's First COVID-19 Case". kentucky.gov. Archived from the original on March 18, 2020. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  3. ^ Desrochers, Daniel (March 14, 2020). "One of two new Kentucky coronavirus cases refused to self-isolate. He's being forced". Lexington Herald-Leader. Archived from the original on May 18, 2020. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  4. ^ a b c d "Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear closes more businesses, adult daycares". WCPO-TV. March 17, 2020. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 18, 2020.
  5. ^ a b c "Patients Tested Positive for COVID-19 in Kentucky". Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services. Archived from the original on March 17, 2020. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  6. ^ Kobin, Billy (March 18, 2020). "First coronavirus patient in Montgomery County, Kentucky, has fully recovered". The Courier-Journal. Retrieved March 18, 2020.
  7. ^ Desrochers, Daniel (March 18, 2020). "9 new Kentucky coronavirus cases found, including infant and wife of Louisville mayor". Lexington Herald-Leader. Archived from the original on May 8, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  8. ^ Patton, Janet (March 16, 2020). "Dining spots scramble as Beshear orders Ky. bars, restaurants to close dine-in service". Lexington Herald-Leader. Archived from the original on May 4, 2020. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  9. ^ Glowicki, Matthew (March 16, 2020). "Kentucky unemployment during coronavirus: Who is eligible and how to apply for it". The Courier-Journal. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  10. ^ a b c d e f "Live Coverage: Coronavirus In The Louisville Area". WFPL. March 16, 2020. Archived from the original on June 19, 2020. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  11. ^ "University of Kentucky extends shift to online instruction". The Hour. March 17, 2020. Archived from the original on March 17, 2020. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  12. ^ Chisenhall, Jeremy (March 16, 2020). "Updated: KY service commission orders utility companies to suspend disconnections". Lexington Herald-Leader. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  13. ^ a b 'This virus is no joke': Kentucky officials don't wait for surge of coronavirus cases to tighten restrictions Archived March 30, 2020, at the Wayback Machine by Anita Hassan, NBC News, 29 Mar 2020
  14. ^ Cheves, John (March 13, 2020). "Kentucky courts closed for a month, federal trials delayed to avoid spreading COVID-19". Lexington Herald-Leader. Archived from the original on May 21, 2020. Retrieved March 18, 2020.
  15. ^ Costello, Darcy (March 17, 2020). "Louisville police won't respond to some types of calls amid coronavirus outbreak". The Courier-Journal. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  16. ^ Chisenhall, Jeremy (March 18, 2020). "'More cautious:' Lexington firefighters, police take steps to guard against COVID-19". Lexington Herald-Leader. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 18, 2020.
  17. ^ Yetter, Deborah (March 18, 2020). "Kentucky is limiting in-person child abuse investigations because of the coronavirus". The Courier-Journal. Retrieved March 18, 2020.
  18. ^ Tobin, Ben (March 18, 2020). "Kentucky temporarily closes all REAL ID offices in response to the coronavirus pandemic". The Courier-Journal. Retrieved March 18, 2020.
  19. ^ "Gov. Beshear says Kentucky now has 103 confirmed cases of COVID-19". WDRB. March 22, 2020. Archived from the original on March 30, 2020. Retrieved March 23, 2020.
  20. ^ Gore, Leada (July 20, 2020). "Kentucky advises travelers to Alabama to quarantine for 14 days on return". al.com. Archived from the original on July 20, 2020. Retrieved July 22, 2020.
  21. ^ Puente, Victor (March 17, 2020). "Beshear executive order helps pharmacists treat at-risk patients". WKYT. Archived from the original on May 11, 2020. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
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