Cheez-It Bowl

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Cheez-It Bowl
CheezIt Bowl Logo 4C.svg
StadiumCamping World Stadium
LocationOrlando, Florida
Previous stadiumsJoe Robbie Stadium (1990–2000)
Previous locationsMiami Gardens, Florida (1990–2000)
Operated1990–present
Conference tie-insACC, Big 12
Previous conference tie-insBig Ten, Big East
PayoutUS$6,071,760 (2019)[1]
Sponsors
Blockbuster (1990–1993)
Carquest (1994–1997)
MicronPC (1998–2000)
Florida Tourism (2001)
Mazda (2002–2003)
Champs Sports (2004–2011)
Russell Athletic (2012–2016)
Camping World (2017–2019)
Cheez-It (2020–present)
Former names
Sunshine Classic (1990, working title)
Blockbuster Bowl (1990–1993)
Carquest Bowl (1994–1997)
MicronPC Bowl (1998)
MicronPC.com Bowl (1999–2000)
Visit Florida Tangerine Bowl (2001)
Mazda Tangerine Bowl (2002–2003)
Champs Sports Bowl (2004–2011)
Russell Athletic Bowl (2012–2016)
Camping World Bowl (2017–2019)
2018 matchup
Syracuse vs. West Virginia (Syracuse 34–18)
2019 matchup
Iowa State vs. Notre Dame (Notre Dame 33–9)

The Cheez-It Bowl is an annual college football bowl game that is played in Orlando, Florida, at Camping World Stadium. The bowl is operated by Florida Citrus Sports, a non-profit group which also organizes the Citrus Bowl and the Florida Classic. It was first played in 1990 in Miami Gardens, Florida, before moving to Orlando in 2001. Originally commissioned as the Sunshine Classic, it has undergone several name changes due to changes in sponsorship, which have included Blockbuster (1990–1993), Carquest (1994–1997), MicronPC (1998–2000), Florida Tourism (2001), Mazda (2002–2003), Champs Sports (2004–2011), Russell Athletic (2012–2016), Camping World (2017–2019) and Cheez-It (2020–present). The game currently has tie-ins with the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) and Big 12 Conference.[2]

History[edit]

The bowl was founded in 1990 by Raycom[3] and was originally played at Joe Robbie Stadium outside the city of Miami. It was formed under the name Sunshine Football Classic, but due to corporate title sponsorships, was never actually contested under this name, nor even referred to as such except during brief intervals between corporate sponsors. During its Miami existence, it successively went by the names Blockbuster Bowl (three editions), CarQuest Bowl (five editions), and the MicronPC Bowl (three editions).

In 2001, the bowl changed hands, and was relocated to Orlando. The bowl was known as the Tangerine Bowl, a historical moniker that was the original title of the game now known as the Citrus Bowl, for three playings. Foot Locker, the parent company of Champs Sports, purchased naming rights in 2004, naming it the Champs Sports Bowl, under which eight games were played. In early 2012, naming rights were agreed to by Russell Athletic;[4] five games were played as the Russell Athletic Bowl. In early 2017, Camping World signed an agreement to be the title sponsor of the game through 2019;[5][2] three editions were staged as the Camping World Bowl, concluding with the 30th playing of the bowl. In May 2020, Cheez-It signed on as the new title sponsor of the game in a multi-year agreement.[6]

Miami[edit]

What is now the Cheez-It Bowl was sprung from a desire to hold a second bowl game in the Miami area. It would be an accompaniment to the long-established and well-known Orange Bowl, and would showcase the brand new stadium in the area that was built in 1987. The Orange Bowl game was still being played in the aging old stadium, whereas this new game would be played in the new stadium.

Miami Dolphins owner Wayne Huizenga quickly joined forces with bowl organizers and brought in Blockbuster Video, which he owned at the time, as title sponsor.[3] The inaugural game, played on December 28, 1990, pitted Florida State and Penn State, and two legendary coaches, Bobby Bowden versus Joe Paterno in front of over 74,000 at Joe Robbie Stadium.[3] Subsequent games, however, never matched the success of the first, even though the bowl was moved to the more prestigious New Year's Day slot starting in 1993.

In 1994, CarQuest Auto Parts became the title sponsor after Huizenga sold Blockbuster Video to Viacom. The New Year's Day experiment was short lived as the organizers of the more established Orange Bowl received permission to move their game into Joe Robbie Stadium beginning in 1996.[3] That bumped the Carquest Bowl back to the less-desirable December date. After the 2000 playing, Florida Citrus Sports took over the game and moved it to Orlando.

Before gaining Blockbuster Entertainment as the corporate sponsor for the inaugural event, the game was tentatively referred to as the Sunshine Classic.[3]

Orlando[edit]

Camping World Stadium in 2015.
Camping World Stadium in 2015

From 2006 to 2010, the bowl matched teams from the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) and the Big Ten Conference. Under the terms of a television deal signed with ESPN in 2006, the bowl was to be held after Christmas Day from 2006 onward, and be shown on ESPN in prime time. The change was made to move the game from the less-desirable pre-Christmas date utilized from 2001 to 2004.

From 2005 to 2009, the stadium faced challenges in preparing the stadium for two bowl games in less than one week (the Citrus Bowl is traditionally held New Year's Day). This was also in part due to the Florida high school football championship games being held at the stadium shortly before the bowls. In 2009, rainy weather turned the stadium's grass field into a muddly, sloppy, quagmire for both bowl games. In 2010, the stadium switched to artificial turf, facilitating the quick turnaround necessary.

In 2009, the bowl announced that the Big East was to be one of the tie-in conferences for four years starting in 2010, with the bowl having the option of selecting Notre Dame once during the four years. In October 2009, the bowl announced that they had extended their agreement with the ACC for the same term. The game would match the third pick from the ACC against the second selection from the Big East. The previous agreement had matched the 4th pick from the ACC against the 4th or 5th pick from the Big Ten.[7] ACC and Big East teams subsequently met in the 2010 through 2013 games, except for 2011 when Notre Dame was selected (as permitted in the agreement with the Big East) and in 2013 when the Louisville Cardinals of the American Athletic Conference were selected ("The American" became the football successor to the Big East in 2013).

Since 2014, the game features the second pick from the ACC after the New Year's Six bowls make their picks—usually the losing team from the ACC Football Championship Game, or one of the division runners-up—against the third pick from the Big 12.

Game results[edit]

All rankings are taken from the AP Poll prior to the game being played.

No. Date Bowl Name Winning Team Losing Team Attnd.[8]
1 December 28, 1990 Blockbuster Bowl No. 6 Florida State 24 No. 7 Penn State 17 74,021
2 December 28, 1991 Blockbuster Bowl No. 8 Alabama 30 No. 15 Colorado 25 46,123
3 January 1, 1993 Blockbuster Bowl No. 13 Stanford 24 No. 21 Penn State 3 45,554
4 January 1, 1994 Carquest Bowl No. 15 Boston College 31 Virginia 13 38,516
5 January 2, 1995 Carquest Bowl South Carolina 24 West Virginia 21 50,853
6 December 30, 1995 Carquest Bowl North Carolina 20 No. 24 Arkansas 10 34,428
7 December 27, 1996 Carquest Bowl No. 19 Miami 31 Virginia 21 46,418
8 December 29, 1997 Carquest Bowl Georgia Tech 35 West Virginia 30 28,262
9 December 29, 1998 MicronPC Bowl No. 24 Miami 46 NC State 23 44,387
10 December 30, 1999 MicronPC.com Bowl Illinois 63 Virginia 21 31,089
11 December 28, 2000 MicronPC.com Bowl NC State 38 Minnesota 30 28,359
12 December 20, 2001 Tangerine Bowl Pittsburgh 34 NC State 19 28,562
13 December 23, 2002 Tangerine Bowl Texas Tech 55 Clemson 15 21,689
14 December 22, 2003 Tangerine Bowl NC State 56 Kansas 26 26,482
15 December 21, 2004 Champs Sports Bowl Georgia Tech 51 Syracuse 14 28,237
16 December 27, 2005 Champs Sports Bowl No. 23 Clemson 19 Colorado 10 31,470
17 December 29, 2006 Champs Sports Bowl Maryland 24 Purdue 7 40,168
18 December 28, 2007 Champs Sports Bowl No. 14 Boston College 24 Michigan State 21 46,554
19 December 27, 2008 Champs Sports Bowl Florida State 42 Wisconsin 13 52,692
20 December 29, 2009 Champs Sports Bowl No. 24 Wisconsin 20 No. 14 Miami 14 56,747
21 December 28, 2010 Champs Sports Bowl NC State 23 No. 22 West Virginia 7 48,962
22 December 29, 2011 Champs Sports Bowl No. 25 Florida State 18 Notre Dame 14 68,305
23 December 28, 2012 Russell Athletic Bowl Virginia Tech 13 Rutgers 10 (OT) 48,129
24 December 28, 2013 Russell Athletic Bowl No. 18 Louisville 36 Miami 9 51,098
25 December 29, 2014 Russell Athletic Bowl No. 18 Clemson 40 Oklahoma 6 40,071
26 December 29, 2015 Russell Athletic Bowl No. 18 Baylor 49 No. 10 North Carolina 38 40,418
27 December 28, 2016 Russell Athletic Bowl Miami 31 No. 14 West Virginia 14 48,625
28 December 28, 2017 Camping World Bowl No. 17 Oklahoma State 30 No. 22 Virginia Tech 21 39,610
29 December 28, 2018 Camping World Bowl No. 17 Syracuse 34 No. 15 West Virginia 18 41,125
30 December 28, 2019 Camping World Bowl No. 14 Notre Dame 33 Iowa State 9 46,948

Games 1–11 played in Miami Gardens, Florida.
Games 12–present played in Orlando, Florida.

MVPs[edit]

1997 MVP Joe Hamilton
Date MVP School Position
December 28, 1990 Amp Lee Florida State RB
December 28, 1991 David Palmer Alabama WR
January 1, 1993 Darrien Gordon Stanford CB
January 1, 1994 Glenn Foley Boston College QB
January 2, 1995 Steve Taneyhill South Carolina QB
December 30, 1995 Leon Johnson North Carolina RB
December 27, 1996 Tremain Mack Miami SS
December 29, 1997 Joe Hamilton Georgia Tech QB
December 29, 1998 Scott Covington Miami QB
December 30, 1999 Kurt Kittner Illinois QB
December 28, 2000 Philip Rivers NC State QB
December 20, 2001 Antonio Bryant Pittsburgh WR
December 23, 2002 Kliff Kingsbury Texas Tech QB
December 22, 2003 Philip Rivers NC State QB
December 21, 2004 Reggie Ball Georgia Tech QB
December 27, 2005 James Davis Clemson RB
December 29, 2006 Sam Hollenbach Maryland QB
December 28, 2007 Jamie Silva Boston College FS
December 27, 2008 Graham Gano Florida State K/P
December 29, 2009 John Clay Wisconsin RB
December 28, 2010 Russell Wilson NC State QB
December 29, 2011 Rashad Greene Florida State WR
December 28, 2012 Antone Exum Virginia Tech CB
December 28, 2013 Teddy Bridgewater Louisville QB
December 29, 2014 Cole Stoudt Clemson QB
December 29, 2015 Johnny Jefferson Baylor RB
December 28, 2016 Brad Kaaya Miami QB
December 28, 2017 Mason Rudolph Oklahoma State QB
December 28, 2018 Eric Dungey Syracuse QB
December 28, 2019 Chase Claypool Notre Dame WR

Most appearances[edit]

Updated through the December 2019 edition (30 games, 60 total appearances).

Teams with multiple appearances
Rank Team Appearances Record Win pct.
T1 NC State 5 3–2 .600
T1 Miami 5 3–2 .600
T1 West Virginia 5 0–5 .000
T4 Florida State 3 3–0 1.000
T4 Clemson 3 2–1 .667
T4 Virginia 3 0–3 .000
T7 Boston College 2 2–0 1.000
T7 Georgia Tech 2 2–0 1.000
T7 North Carolina 2 1–1 .500
T7 Notre Dame 2 1–1 .500
T7 Syracuse 2 1–1 .500
T7 Virginia Tech 2 1–1 .500
T7 Wisconsin 2 1–1 .500
T7 Colorado 2 0–2 .000
T7 Penn State 2 0–2 .000
Teams with a single appearance

Won: Alabama, Baylor, Illinois, Louisville, Maryland, Oklahoma State, Pittsburgh, South Carolina, Stanford, Texas Tech
Lost: Arkansas, Iowa State, Kansas, Michigan State, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Purdue, Rutgers

Appearances by conference[edit]

Updated through the December 2019 edition (30 games, 60 total appearances).

Conference Record Appearances by season
Games W L Win pct. Won Lost
ACC 25 15 10 .600 1995, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2016, 2018 1993*, 1996, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2009, 2013, 2015, 2017
The American 10 5 5 .500 1993*, 1996, 1998, 2001, 2013 1994*, 1997, 2004, 2010, 2012
Big 12 9 3 6 .333 2002, 2015, 2017 2003, 2005, 2014, 2016, 2018, 2019
Big Ten 6 2 4 .333 1999, 2009 2000, 2006, 2007, 2008
Independents 5 2 3 .400 1990, 2019 1990, 1992*, 2011
SEC 3 2 1 .667 1991, 1994* 1995
Pac-10 1 1 0 1.000 1992*  
Big Eight 1 0 1 .000   1991
  • Games marked with an asterisk (*) were played in January of the following calendar year.
  • The American record includes appearances of the Big East Conference, as The American retains the charter of the original Big East, following its 2013 realignment. Teams representing the Big East appeared in nine games, compiling a 4–5 record.
  • The Big Eight Conference dissolved after the 1995 season.
  • Independents: Penn State (1990, 1992), Florida State (1990), Notre Dame (2011, 2019)

Game records[edit]

Team Record, Team vs. Opponent Year
Most points scored (one team) 63, Illinois vs. Virginia 1999
Most points scored (both teams) 87, Baylor vs. North Carolina 2015
Most points scored (losing team) 38, North Carolina vs. Baylor 2015
Fewest points allowed 3, Stanford vs. Penn State 1993 (Jan.)
Largest margin of victory 42, Illinois vs. Virginia 1999
Total yards
Rushing yards
Passing yards
First downs
Fewest yards allowed
Fewest rushing yards allowed
Fewest passing yards allowed
Individual Record, Player, Team vs. Opponent Year
All-purpose yards
Touchdowns (all-purpose)
Rushing yards
Rushing touchdowns
Passing yards
Passing touchdowns
Receiving yards
Receiving touchdowns
Tackles
Sacks
Interceptions
Long Plays Record, Player, Team vs. Opponent Year
Touchdown run
Touchdown pass
Kickoff return
Punt return
Interception return
Fumble return
Punt
Field goal
Miscellaneous Record, Teams Year
Largest attendance 74,021, Florida State vs. Penn State 1990

Source:

Media coverage[edit]

The bowl was televised by Raycom in its inaugural year, followed by CBS Sports (four editions), TBS (six editions), and ESPN since 2001.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2019 Bowl Schedule". collegefootballpoll.com. Retrieved December 13, 2019.
  2. ^ a b "About". campingworldbowl.com. 2017. Retrieved December 24, 2017.
  3. ^ a b c d e "The Making of a Blockbuster: How Wayne Huizenga Built a Sports and Entertainment Empire from Trash, Grit, and Videotape". Wiley. 1997. Retrieved 2008-01-01.
  4. ^ "Russell Athletic Bowl History". RussellAthleticBowl.com. Archived from the original on 29 December 2016. Retrieved 28 December 2016.
  5. ^ "CAMPING WORLD SIGNS ON AS TITLE SPONSOR OF ORLANDO BOWL". campingworldbowl.com. April 11, 2017. Retrieved December 24, 2017.
  6. ^ "Cheez-It® Heads To Orlando To Join Florida Citrus Sports Beginning With 2020 Season". cheezitbowl.com. May 27, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  7. ^ Adelson, Andrea (October 7, 2009). "College football: ACC improves deal with Champs Sports Bowl; will send No. 3 team to Orlando beginning in 2010". OrlandoSentinel.com. Archived from the original on October 9, 2009 – via Wayback Machine.
  8. ^ "History". campingworldbowl.com. Retrieved December 29, 2017.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]