Colette Cunningham

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Colette Cunningham
Personal information
Full name Colette Helen Cunningham[1]
Date of birth (1971-07-01) July 1, 1971 (age 49)[2]
Place of birth Virginia, United States
Height 5 ft 4 in (1.63 m)[2]
Playing position(s) Forward[2]
Youth career
BRYC Shooting Stars
0000–1989 Lake Braddock Bruins
College career
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1989 Marymount Saints 18 (39)
1990–1992 NC State Wolfpack ? (42)
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1994 Washington Warthogs (indoor) 12 (0)
1994–1995 Lazio
1995–1998 Sporting Sorrento Crems
1997–2001 Maryland Pride
Soccer Academy United
National team
1992 United States 2 (0)
Teams managed
1994 American Eagles (assistant)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Colette Helen Cunningham (formerly Landon; born July 1, 1971) is an American former soccer player who played as a forward, making two appearances for the United States women's national team.

Career[edit]

In high school, Cunningham was a four-year varsity player for the Lake Braddock Bruins soccer team, which won the state championship in her senior year. She also played basketball during her high school career.[3] In college, she played for the Marymount Saints in her freshman year of 1989, scoring 39 goals and registering 20 assists in 18 appearances. She holds the NCAA Division III record for most points (goals and assists) in a season (98) and most points per game in a season (5.44).[4] The following year she joined the NC State Wolfpack, where she played until 1992 and was a letter-winner. She scored 42 goals and registed 22 assists during her three seasons with the Wolfpack. She was selected in the ACC All-Tournament team in 1991, as well as the All-ACC First Team in 1991 and 1992.[5]

Cunningham made her international debut for the United States on August 14, 1992 in a friendly match against Norway, which finished as a 1–3 loss. She earned her second and final cap two days later against the same opponent, which finished as a 2–4 loss.[2]

In 1994 Cunningham played for the indoor soccer for the Washington Warthogs of the CISL.[6] She recorded two assists in twelve regular season appearances and one postseason game,[7] becoming the first woman to register a point in U.S. men's professional soccer.[8] She played for the Maryland Pride in the USL W-League from 1997 to 1999, winning the 1996 championship. Following the season, she moved to Italy to play in Rome for Lazio of Serie A. In 1995, she moved to Sporting Sorrento Crems in Sorrento (near Naples), where she played until 1998. She also played for the Maryland Pride in 1997 upon return to the U.S. for the off-season. In 1998, she returned to the United States to care for her ill father and continued playing for the Maryland Pride.[9] She also played for the Soccer Academy United team which won three USASA National Women's Amateur titles.[10]

Cunningham also was an assistant coach for the American Eagles in 1994.[11] She was inducted into the Virginia–D.C. Soccer Hall of Fame in 2019.[12]

Personal life[edit]

Cunningham gave birth to her son Kevin in 1996.[10] In 1999, she began a career in law enforcement,[13] and currently works as a patrol lieutenant for the Loudoun County Sheriff's Office in Loudoun County, Virginia.[12] She was born with the surname Cunningham, and later took the married name Landon, which she no longer uses.[14]

Career statistics[edit]

International[edit]

United States[2]
Year Apps Goals
1992 2 0
Total 2 0

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Obituaries". The Washington Post. August 29, 1998. Archived from the original on August 12, 2019. Retrieved August 12, 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d e "2019 U.S. Women's National Team Media Guide" (PDF). United States Soccer Federation. 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 8, 2019. Retrieved August 12, 2019.
  3. ^ Kennedy, Kathleen (December 3, 1988). "Girls Basketball". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on August 12, 2019. Retrieved August 12, 2019.
  4. ^ "Division III Women's Soccer Records" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. 2017. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 12, 2019. Retrieved August 12, 2019.
  5. ^ "NC State Women's Soccer Program Records" (PDF). NC State Wolfpack. March 22, 2018. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 12, 2019. Retrieved August 12, 2019.
  6. ^ Fitzhenry, Mark (June 10, 1994). "Warthogs sign local female player". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on August 12, 2019. Retrieved August 12, 2019.
  7. ^ "Colette Cunningham". JustSportsStats.com. Archived from the original on August 12, 2019. Retrieved August 12, 2019.
  8. ^ Glick, Shav (July 30, 1994). "She's Allowed to 'Hog the Ball With the Guys". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on August 12, 2019. Retrieved August 12, 2019.
  9. ^ Caparaz, Dean (May 17, 2000). "W-League: Laying the groundwork". Soccer America. Archived from the original on August 12, 2019. Retrieved August 12, 2019.
  10. ^ a b Mattei, Al. "Maryland Pride based its fortunes on four mothers". TopOfTheCircle.com. Beltsville, Maryland. Archived from the original on August 12, 2019. Retrieved August 12, 2019.
  11. ^ Fitzhenry, Mark (May 17, 1994). "Woman seeks place among the 'Hogs". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on August 12, 2019. Retrieved August 12, 2019.
  12. ^ a b "Colette Cunningham". Virginia–D.C. Soccer Hall of Fame. 2019. Archived from the original on August 12, 2019. Retrieved August 12, 2019.
  13. ^ Collazo, Veronike (August 30, 2016). "Shattering Stereotypes: Loudoun's Women in Law Enforcement". The Loudoun Tribune. Archived from the original on August 12, 2019. Retrieved August 12, 2019.
  14. ^ "3rd Annual Arlington Police, Fire and Sheriff 9-11 Memorial 5k Run". RacePacket. September 4, 2004. Archived from the original on September 5, 2019. Retrieved September 5, 2019.