Comedy Theatre, Melbourne

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Comedy Theatre
J C Williamson Comedy Theatre[1]
ComedyTheatreMelbourne1.JPG
Address240 Exhibition Street, Melbourne
Melbourne
Australia
Coordinates37°48′37″S 144°58′13″E / 37.81028°S 144.97028°E / -37.81028; 144.97028Coordinates: 37°48′37″S 144°58′13″E / 37.81028°S 144.97028°E / -37.81028; 144.97028
OwnerMarriner Group
Capacity1003
Opened28 April 1928[1][2]
Website
www.marrinergroup.com.au

The Comedy Theatre is a 1003-seat theatre in Melbourne's East End Theatre District. It was built in 1928, and was designed in the Spanish style, with a Florentine-style exterior and wrought-iron balconies. It is located at 240 Exhibition Street, and diagonally opposite Her Majesty's Theatre.

Erected on the site of one of Melbourne's earliest play-houses, the old "Iron Pot", (officially the "Coppin's Olympic Theatre") a theatre originally built 1855 and abandoned in 1894.[3] It was a prefabricated iron theatre purchased in Manchester, England by George Selth Coppin.[1][4][5]

The Comedy Theatre was built and operated for fifty years by J.C. Williamson's. Paul Dainty purchased the theatre in 1978 for $800,000.[6] Since 1996 the theatre has been owned and operated by Marriner Group.

It typically hosts commercial seasons of plays and smaller-scale musicals, as well as comedy and other entertainment events.

Previous productions[edit]

Previous notable productions and performers at the Comedy Theatre include:[7]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Comedy Theatre Opening". The Argus. Melbourne. 28 April 1928. p. 26. Retrieved 4 December 2012 – via National Library of Australia.
  2. ^ "NEW MELBOURNE THEATRE". The Argus. Melbourne. 27 April 1928. p. 11. Retrieved 4 December 2012 – via National Library of Australia.
  3. ^ "GOPPIN'S OLYMPIC THEATRE". The Argus. Melbourne. 27 July 1855. p. 4. Retrieved 4 December 2012 – via National Library of Australia.
  4. ^ George Coppin 1819–1906, Live Performance Australia
  5. ^ "MELBOURNE'S OLDEST THEATRES". The Mercury. Hobart, Tasmania. 21 January 1930. p. 2. Retrieved 4 December 2012 – via National Library of Australia.
  6. ^ "Theatre bought". The Canberra Times. 52, (15, 584). Australian Capital Territory, Australia. 23 May 1978. p. 18. Retrieved 28 April 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  7. ^ "AusStage - Comedy Theatre". www.ausstage.edu.au. Retrieved 27 April 2019.
  8. ^ https://www.ausstage.edu.au/pages/event/62182
  9. ^ https://www.ausstage.edu.au/pages/event/98897
  10. ^ https://www.ausstage.edu.au/pages/event/98918
  11. ^ https://www.ausstage.edu.au/pages/event/98631
  12. ^ https://www.ausstage.edu.au/pages/event/98492
  13. ^ https://www.ausstage.edu.au/pages/venue/98
  14. ^ http://www.stagewhispers.com.au/news/yes-prime-minister-cast-announced
  15. ^ http://www.stagewhispers.com.au/reviews/madiba-musical
  16. ^ https://www.australianbookreview.com.au/abr-arts/101-arts-update/5377-33-variations-comedy-theatre

External links[edit]