Convention on the Nationality of Women

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Convention on the Nationality of Women was the first international treaty ever adopted concerning women's rights. It was adopted in 1933 by the Pan American Union in Montevideo, Uruguay.[1]

At the Hague Codification Conference in 1930, the issue of discriminatory nationality laws was raised.[2] In many countries, women lost their nationality upon marriage[3] and had no control over their own assets or children.[4] After a multi-year study completed by the Inter-American Commission of Women, Doris Stevens presented their findings showing the disparity of laws governing citizenship between men and women to the delegates.[1] The Seventh International Conference of American States agreed that "There shall be no distinction based on sex as regards nationality, in their legislation or in their practice".[5]

This agreement, which effected only the status of the member states in the Americas,[1] was the precursor to the United Nations own study on the subject of nationality begun in 1948.[3] The Convention on the Nationality of Married Women passed in 1957, extending nationality protection to women beyond the Americas.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "The World's First Treaty of Equality for Women - Montevideo, Uruguay, 1933". Organization of American States. Washington, D.C.: Inter-American Commission of Women. 1933. Archived from the original on 26 February 2016. Retrieved 3 March 2016.
  2. ^ a b Freeman, Rudolf & Chinkin 2012, p. 235.
  3. ^ a b Green 1956, p. 750.
  4. ^ Phayre, Ignatius (1 May 1921). "A Woman Don Quixote in the Harems of Spain". The New York Times Book Review and Magazine. New York City, New York. Retrieved 28 February 2016 – via Newspapers.com.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link) open access
  5. ^ "Convention on the Nationality of Women". Organization of American States. Washington, D.C.: Inter-American Commission of Women. 26 December 1933. Archived from the original on 8 March 2016. Retrieved 3 March 2016.

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