Convention on the Transfer of Sentenced Persons

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The Convention on the Transfer of Sentenced Persons is an international treaty regulating the extradition and social rehabilitation of imprisoned persons. The convention was concluded in Strasbourg on 21 March 1983 and entered into force on 1 July 1985. It has been ratified by 66 countries, including every country of the Council of Europe except Monaco.[1] It has also been ratified by 19 states outside the Council of Europe, including Australia, Canada, Israel, Japan, South Korea, Mexico,the United States and India. The latest accession to the convention was India in January 2018. The convention, in particular, gives foreigners convicted of a criminal offence the possibility of serving their sentences in their home countries.

Terms[edit]

According to convention, the extradition (transfer) may be requested by either the state in which the sentence was imposed (the "sentencing State") or the state of which the sentenced person is a national (the "administering State").

Article 12 lets each party of the convention grant pardon or commutation of the sentence in accordance with its constitution or other laws.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Convention on the Transfer of Sentenced Persons". Council of Europe. Retrieved 3 September 2012.
  2. ^ "Convention on the Transfer of Sentenced Persons". Council of Europe. 21 March 1983. Retrieved 3 September 2012.