Corporate Town of Jamestown

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The Corporate Town of Jamestown was a local government area in South Australia, centred on the town of Jamestown. It was proclaimed on 25 July 1878, severing the seven-year old settlement of Jamestown from the surrounding District Council of Belalie. The first mayor was John Cockburn, later Premier of South Australia, with George Hingston Lake as town clerk. Under the new council, it instituted a tree-planting program from 1879, reportedly the first town in rural South Australia to do so.[1][2][3]

In 1881, it was reported to have a population of 995; while this remained static for some decades, by 1936, it was reported to have a population of over 1,500, with 361 dwellings and 106 businesses, with the surrounding area described as "one of the best agricultural districts in this state". In the 1950s, the council offices were based out of the former Jamestown Institute, by then converted to a memorial hall. In 1979, the council launched a program of kerbing and sealing Jamestown streets. On 1 January 1991, it merged into the surrounding District Council of Jamestown; the merged council would itself amalgamate with surrounding municipalities to form the Northern Areas Council in 1997.[1][2][3]

Mayors[edit]

  • John Cockburn (1878–1881) [3][4][5][6]
  • Hillary Boucaut (1881) [7]
  • James Wilkinson (1884) [8]
  • William Haslam (1890) [9]
  • Hillary Boucaut (1892) [10]
  • Thomas Carter (1893–1895) [11][12][13]
  • William Blair Aitken (1898) [14]
  • Donald Rosie (1907) [15]
  • Ralph Edmund Humphris (1918–1921) [16][17][18][19]
  • J. Firmin Jenkins (1921) [20]
  • L. M. W. Judell (1928) [21]
  • Patrick Joseph McCarthy (1933–1935) [22]
  • Douglas le Rey Boucaut (1935–1937) [22]
  • Edmund Thomas Daly (1937–1946) [22]
  • Patrick Joseph McCarthy (1946–1948) [22]
  • Edmund Thomas Daly (1948–1949) [22]
  • Ross McLennan (1949–1951) [22]
  • Robert Leach Parnwell Knight (1951–1955) [22]
  • Raphael James Parri (1955–1959) [22]
  • Gordon Gilfillan (1959–1962) [22]
  • William Glanville Thomas (1962–1966) [22]
  • Brian Norman Williams (1966–1970) [22]
  • Reginald Peter Octoman (1970–1973) [22]
  • Eric Stanley Robinson (1973–1977) [22]
  • George McMillan Polomka (1977–1982) [22]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Marsden, Susan (2012). "A History of South Australian Councils to 1936" (PDF). Local Government Association of South Australia. p. 41. Retrieved 30 October 2015.
  2. ^ a b "Jamestown". Northern Areas Council. Retrieved 17 March 2016.
  3. ^ a b c Hosking, P. (1936). The Official civic record of South Australia : centenary year, 1936. Adelaide: Universal Publicity Company. p. 272.
  4. ^ "JAMESTOWN". South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail. XXII, (1, 111). 6 December 1879. p. 2 (SUPPLEMENT TO THE SOUTH AUSTRALIAN CHRONICLE). Retrieved 17 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  5. ^ "JAMESTOWN". South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail. XXIII, (1, 163). 4 December 1880. p. 25. Retrieved 17 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  6. ^ "PORT WAKEFIELD, December 22". Evening Journal. XIII, (3948). South Australia. 22 December 1881. p. 2 (SECOND EDITION). Retrieved 17 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  7. ^ "JAMESTOWN". The South Australian Advertiser. XXIV, (7210). 26 November 1881. p. 6. Retrieved 17 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  8. ^ "JAMESTOWN". South Australian Register. XLIX, (11, 867). South Australia. 25 November 1884. p. 7. Retrieved 17 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  9. ^ "JAMESTOWN". South Australian Register. LV, (13, 740). 26 November 1890. p. 6. Retrieved 17 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  10. ^ "JAMESTOWN". Adelaide Observer. XLIX, (2669). 26 November 1892. p. 32. Retrieved 17 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  11. ^ "JAMESTOWN". South Australian Register. LVIII, (14, 676). 25 November 1893. p. 7. Retrieved 17 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  12. ^ "JAMESTOWN". South Australian Register. LIX, (14, 989). 27 November 1894. p. 7. Retrieved 17 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  13. ^ "PORT WAKEFILD, September 2". South Australian Register. LX, (15, 230). 5 September 1895. p. 6. Retrieved 17 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  14. ^ "JAMESTOWN". South Australian Register. LXIII, (16, 237). 26 November 1898. p. 7. Retrieved 17 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  15. ^ "JAMESTOWN". The Register. LXXII, (19, 050). South Australia. 3 December 1907. p. 10. Retrieved 17 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  16. ^ "JAMESTOWN". The Observer. LXXV, (5, 733). South Australia. 7 December 1918. p. 12. Retrieved 17 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  17. ^ "Jamestown". The Recorder (3270). South Australia. 6 December 1919. p. 3. Retrieved 17 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  18. ^ "JAMESTOWN". The Express and Telegraph. LVIII, (17, 206). South Australia. 7 December 1920. p. 1 (5 O'CLOCK EDITION.). Retrieved 17 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  19. ^ "GAWLER". The Chronicle. LXIV, (3, 391). South Australia. 17 September 1921. p. 11. Retrieved 17 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  20. ^ "PORT PIRIE". The Chronicle. LXIV, (3, 393). South Australia. 1 October 1921. p. 11. Retrieved 17 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  21. ^ "JAMESTOWN". The Advertiser. South Australia. 4 December 1928. p. 20. Retrieved 17 March 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  22. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Matthews, Penny (1986), South Australia, the civic record, 1836-1986, Wakefield Press, pp. 225–226, ISBN 978-0-949268-82-2

Coordinates: 33°12′19″S 138°36′7″E / 33.20528°S 138.60194°E / -33.20528; 138.60194