Crystal Airport (Minnesota)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Coordinates: 45°03′43″N 093°21′14″W / 45.06194°N 93.35389°W / 45.06194; -93.35389

Crystal Airport
Crystal Airport 05042012.jpg
Summary
Airport typePublic
OwnerMetropolitan Airports Commission
ServesMinneapolis, Minnesota
LocationCrystal, Minnesota
Opened1948
Elevation AMSL869 ft / 265 m
Map
MIC is located in Minnesota
MIC
MIC
Location of airport in Minnesota / United States
MIC is located in the United States
MIC
MIC
MIC (the United States)
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
14L/32R 3,268 995 Asphalt
14R/32L 3,267 995 Asphalt
6L/24R 2,500 762 Asphalt
6R/24L 2,123 647 Turf
Statistics
Aircraft operations (2014)42,351
Based aircraft (2017)177

Crystal Airport (IATA: MIC, ICAO: KMIC, FAA LID: MIC) is a public airport named after the city of Crystal in Hennepin County, Minnesota, United States. Most of the airport is in the city of Crystal. Portions north of taxiway C (62nd Avenue) are in Brooklyn Park, and the north east corner of the airport is in Brooklyn Center. It is eight miles (13 km) northwest of the central business district of Minneapolis and is owned by the Metropolitan Airports Commission.[1]

The airport opened in 1946 as a privately owned public use airport. In 1948 the Metropolitan Airports Commission purchased the airport. Additional land purchases were made in 1951 and 1954.[2]

Facilities and aircraft[edit]

Crystal Airport covers an area of 436 acres (176 ha) which contains four runways:[1]

  • Runway 14L/32R: 3,268 x 75 ft (995 x 23 m), Surface: Asphalt
  • Runway 14R/32L: 3,267 x 75 ft (995 x 23 m), Surface: Asphalt
  • Runway 6L/24R: 2,500 x 75 ft (762 x 23 m), Surface: Asphalt
  • Runway 6R/24L: 2,123 x 150 ft (647 x 46 m), Surface: Turf

The open area on the west side of the airport between Runways 24L and 32R is large enough to support blimp mooring.

For the 12-month period ending December 31, 2014, the airport had 42,351 aircraft operations, an average of 116 per day: 1% air taxi and 99% general aviation. In January 2017, there were 177 aircraft based at this airport: 159 single-engine, 11 multi-engine and 7 helicopter.[3]

The airport has a viewing area open from 8:00 AM – 8:00 PM from May 1 until the first snowfall that is free to the public with a picnic shelter and unobstructed views of the airfield and air traffic control tower.[4]

The airport has a full-service FBO offering flight training, charters, air-taxi, scenic flights, indoor and outdoor aircraft parking, rental cars, aviation fuel, pilot shop, and aircraft service.[5] Wentworth Aircraft, an aircraft salvage businesses, is located at the Crystal Airport in the former Crystal Shamrock facilities.[2] The oldest active business at Crystal is Maxwell Aircraft Service, also known as "The Prop Shop". It was founded by Ken Maxwell in 1946, moved to the Crystal Airport in 1951.[2]

Several flying clubs are based at the airport including Club Cherokee, Gopher Flying Club, and Yankee Flying Club.

Wiley Properties started in 1954 owns and rents approximately 100 hangars at the airport.[6]

History[edit]

The Robbinsdale Airport located in Robbinsdale, MN hosted an airfield from the early 1920s. It was located near the intersection of West Broadway and 49th Avenue N. It closed before the Crystal Airport opened.[7][8]

The current Crystal Airport is located one mile northeast of the original airfield. The airport site was acquired by the Metropolitan Airports Commission in 1948.

In 1952 the airport had a 2500 foot by 75 foot paved northwest-southeast runway and a parallel turf runway along with two crosswind northeast-southwest turf runways. In 1961 the primary runway was expanded to its current length and the crosswind runway was paved.[9]

Crystal Shamrock was founded in 1959. Starting in 1972 they began operating DC-3's for charter flights as Crystal Shamrock Airlines. In 1980 the airline transported Herb Brooks and the U.S. Olympic Hockey Team to Warroad, Minnesota, to play the local high school team.[10] The business closed in the 2007. An auction was held on Saturday, October 27, 2007 to sell of the remaining assets.[11] Wentworth Aircraft acquired the former Crystal Shamrock buildings.

Other former FBO's located at the Crystal Airport include: Crystal Skyways, Inc., Flying Scotchman, Inc., and Helicopter Flight, Inc.[12] Flying Scotchman started by Roy and Karol Arneson as a flying club and became a FBO in 1959. It operated for 53 years before closing on February, 1, 2011.[13] Bolduc Aviation Specialized Services was started by Darrell Bolduc in 1979 at the Minneapolis Crystal Airport. The company moved to Anoka County–Blaine Airport in 1983.[14]

Transit[edit]

Crystal Airport is served by MetroTransit Routes 721, 716, and 767.[15]

The METRO Blue Line light rail extension will have a stop at the Crystal Airport linking downtown Minneapolis, Target Field, U.S. Bank Stadium, the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport, and the Mall of America to the Crystal Airport with a single seat light rail trip.[16]

Events[edit]

Crystal Airport hosts an open house every year on Father's Day weekend. Events include a free hangar dance with a live band, fireworks, food concessions, airplane rides, helicopter rides, pancake breakfast, craft / vendor fair, and displays including law enforcement, ambulance, and public works.[17]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c FAA Airport Master Record for MIC (Form 5010 PDF), effective Jan 5, 2017.
  2. ^ a b c Foster, Tom (January 2015). "Airport of the Month". Minnesota Flyer.
  3. ^ "FAA ATADS". Retrieved 2014-03-11.
  4. ^ "Friends of the Crystal Airport". www.facebook.com. Retrieved 2017-08-10.
  5. ^ "Home - Thunderbird Aviation". Thunderbird Aviation. Retrieved 2017-08-10.
  6. ^ "Midwest Flyer Magazine, March 2012 issue". www.midwestflyer.com. 2012-03-25. Retrieved 2019-02-25.
  7. ^ "Abandoned & Little-Known Airfields - Robbinsdale Airport". www.airfields-freeman.com. Retrieved 2018-12-26.
  8. ^ "Robbinsdale Historical Society - Robbinsdale Airport". www.robbinsdale.org. Retrieved 2018-12-26.
  9. ^ "Crystal Airport 2035 LTCP".
  10. ^ "Midwest Flyer Magazine, October/November 2009 issue" (PDF).
  11. ^ "Crystal Shamrock Auction Flyer" (PDF). Retrieved 2019-02-25.
  12. ^ AOPA Airports 2000
  13. ^ "Flying Scotchman's Karol Arneson". www.midwestflyer.com. Retrieved 2019-02-22.
  14. ^ "Bolduc Aviation Under New Ownership". www.midwestflyer.com. Retrieved 2019-02-22.
  15. ^ "Interactive Transit Map". www.metrotransit.org. Retrieved 2017-08-10.
  16. ^ "Metro Blue Line Extension".
  17. ^ "Crystal Airport Open House".

Flying Clubs[edit]

External links[edit]