Diabetic sock

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People with diabetes have a greater chance of developing neuropathy, vascular disease, and infections, especially in the legs, so socks and footwear that reduce or eliminate pressures or hot spots is important. A diabetic sock is a non-restrictive, but close fitting sock which is designed to alleviate pressures on the foot or leg.[1] Typically sufferers of diabetes are the most common users of this type of sock.[2] Diabetes raises the blood sugar level, which can increase the risk of foot ulcers. Diabetic socks are made to be unrestrictive of circulation, but if inclusive of Medical Grade, FDA regulated gradient compression, may be include venous compression for enhanced circulation.[citation needed][3]

Proper diabetic socks also help to manage moisture,[2][4] a feature which can reduce the risk of infection. Another beneficial feature of diabetic socks is seamless toe-closures to avoid pressure, potential hot spots and blistering.[2]

Varieties[edit]

Various sock constructions are available, including cotton blend with stretch tops, non-cotton with antimicrobial properties, compression type, and plain non-binding to allow circulation to flow more freely. Extra wide socks are available for excessive edema. So-called "non-binding" versions should not be loose to the point of having wrinkles, which can cause hot spots. The ideal sock for Diabetes will be treated in the fabric fibers with an antimicrobial that lasts the life of the sock.“The Athlete’s and Retailer’s Guide to Graduated Compression: Real Life Lessons from Marketer/Inventor[5]

Diabetic socks may appear like regular socks, and are available in many leg lengths. Although various colors are available, white may be preferable for people with open wounds or sores, as this could alert wearers with compromised sensation to a draining wound. The diabetic socks should fit well, without constricting cuffs, lumps, or uncomfortable seams. The socks are generally made of material that does not wrinkle.[6] The advice of a podiatrist may be helpful in choosing a diabetic sock.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Veves, Aristidis; Giurini, John M.; LoGerfo, Frank W. (2012). The Diabetic Foot: Medical and Surgical Management. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 266. ISBN 9781617797910.
  2. ^ a b c Diabetic Socks - What is a Diabetic Sock & What Socks are Available
  3. ^ An Evolution of Socks and Compression Sleeves: From Simple Support to Injury Prevention
  4. ^ Sockwear Recommendations for People With Diabetes
  5. ^ Diabetic Sock Technical Requirements. David B. Higgins, C.F., Designer, Hosiery Specialist. Created on October 22, 2004, updated November 2009
  6. ^ "The Definitive Guide to Diabetic Socks". www.wholesalediabeticsocks.com. 21 July 2016. Retrieved 30 July 2016.
  7. ^ Sockwear Recommendations for People With Diabetes - Feldman and Davis 14 (2): 59 - Diabetes Spectrum