District Council of Crystal Brook

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The District Council of Crystal Brook was a local government area in South Australia from 1882 until 1988, seated at Crystal Brook.

History[edit]

The Hundred of Crystal Brook was released for settlement under the Strangways Land Act with the first land sale on 3 March 1873. A Local Board of Main Roads for the North Midland District was established at Gladstone in 1874. This ceased to function in 1887. The District Council of Crystal Brook was proclaimed on 11 November 1882, and comprised only the township of Crystal Brook and the suburban sections of the hundred, after a proposed broader council covering the entire hundred met with resistance from rural residents.[1]

The council expanded significantly under the District Councils Act 1887, adding the remainder of the Hundred of Crystal Brook, the sections of the Hundred of Pirie not included in the Corporate Town of Port Pirie, the entirety of the Hundreds of Napperby and Wandearah, and the as yet ungazetted Hundred of Howe (section of the Wirrabara Forest Reserve within the County of Victoria).[2] It was divided into four wards on 7 June 1888.[3] The larger boundaries were short-lived, as on 16 June 1892, the section within the Hundred of Pirie, the Hundred of Wandearah and the northern portions of the hundreds of Nappery and Howe were severed to create the District Council of Pirie. The left the Crystal Brooke council constituted by just the Hundred of Crystal Brook, the Warnertown section of the Hundred of Napperby, and the south half of the Hundred of Howe.[3][4][5]

By the 1920s, the council offices were leased from the Crystal Brook Institute.[6][7] In 1936, the district was estimated to have a population of 1,475 people, with 452 of them being ratepayers.[3] In the early 1970s, it constructed a new caravan park in the town with the assistance of the state government.[8] It published a local history, Changing with Crystal Brook, 1873-1973 by J. Poore, in 1973.[9] The council ceased to exist on 1 July 1988 when it amalgamated with the District Council of Redhill to form the District Council of Crystal Brook-Redhill, at the instigation of the two councils.[10] They had previously proposed for the District Council of Georgetown to join the merger, but this had not been successful.[11][12][13]

Neighbouring local government[edit]

The following adjacent local government bodies co-existed with the Crystal Brook council:

Chairmen[edit]

  • E. Prescott (1882-1885) [3]
  • P. H. Claridge (1885-1886) [3]
  • C. F. Mole (1886-1887) [3]
  • P. H. Claridge (1887-1889) [3][14]
  • E. H. Eagle (1889-1892) [3]
  • M. J. B. Wake (1892-1898) [3]
  • W. H. Binney (1898-1906) [3]
  • G. Davidson (1906-1921) [3]
  • R. M. Dennis (1922-1923) [3]
  • G. Davidson (1923-1924) [3]
  • A. McDonald (1924-1929) [3]
  • William Walsh Robinson (1929-1942) [15]
  • Peter O'Shaughnessy (1942-1947) [15]
  • Cecil Graham Davidson (1947-1953) [15]
  • Reginald Keith Hosking (1953-1954) [15]
  • Patrick Curtin (1954-1958) [15]
  • Michael John Slattery (1958-1966) [15]
  • Edward Tait Sinclair (1966-1968) [15]
  • Michael John Slattery (1968-1969) [15]
  • Edwin Latta Robinson (1969-1972) [15]
  • Roland Franklin Nicholls (1972-1979) [15]
  • Colin Leslie Matheson (1979-1983) [15]
  • John William Millard (1983-?) [15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "No title". The Areas' Express. V, (534). South Australia. 15 November 1882. p. 2. Retrieved 6 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  2. ^ "The District Councils Act 1887 No. 419". Flinders University. Retrieved 14 November 2015.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Hosking, P. (1936). The Official civic record of South Australia : centenary year, 1936. Adelaide: Universal Publicity Company. p. 534.
  4. ^ "TO CORRESPONDENTS". South Australian Chronicle. XXXIII, (1, 712). South Australia. 13 June 1891. p. 4. Retrieved 6 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  5. ^ "Proclamations" (PDF). South Australian Government Gazette (26 ed.). Government of South Australia. 1892: 1330-1331. 16 June 1892. Retrieved 10 July 2017.
  6. ^ "1882 Crystal Brook Council Jubilee 1932". Laura Standard and Crystal Brook Courier. XLI, (2180). South Australia. 2 September 1932. p. 1. Retrieved 6 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  7. ^ "DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CRYSTAL BROOK". Laura Standard and Crystal Brook Courier. XXXVII, (1, 946). South Australia. 25 November 1927. p. 3. Retrieved 6 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  8. ^ "Press Release from the Premier, Mr. Dunstan" (PDF). Dunstan Collection, Flinders University Library. 19 September 1972. Retrieved 6 April 2016.
  9. ^ "Bibliography - The Flinders Ranges". Retrieved 6 April 2016.
  10. ^ "Thursday, 9 June 1988" (PDF). The Government Gazette of South Australia. Government of South Australia. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  11. ^ "Inquiry and recommendation in relation to a proposal by the District Councils of Crystal Brook and Redhill to amalgamate their areas and form a new council". Local Government Advisory Commission. 1988. Retrieved 6 April 2016.
  12. ^ "Cabinet Documents: June 1988". Department of Premier and Cabinet. Archived from the original on 20 March 2016. Retrieved 6 April 2016.
  13. ^ "Inquiry and recommendation in relation to a proposal by the District Council of Crystal Brook and the District Council of Redhill for the amalgamation of the areas of the District Council of Crystal Brook, the District Council of Redhill and the District Council of Georgetown to form a new council area". Local Government Advisory Commission. 1987. Retrieved 6 April 2016.
  14. ^ "CENTRAL BOARD OF HEALTH". The South Australian Advertiser. South Australia. 18 January 1889. p. 3. Retrieved 6 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Matthews, Penny (1986), South Australia, the civic record, 1836-1986, Wakefield Press, p. 135, ISBN 978-0-949268-82-2

Coordinates: 33°20′S 138°10′E / 33.333°S 138.167°E / -33.333; 138.167 (Former DC of Crystal Brook)