Flag of the United Arab Emirates

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United Arab Emirates
Flag of the United Arab Emirates.svg
UseNational flag and state ensign
Proportion1:2
AdoptedDecember 2, 1971
DesignA horizontal tricolour of green, white and black with a vertical ​14-width red bar at the hoist
Designed byH.E. Abdulla Mohamed Almaainah, current Ambassador of the UAE to the Czech Republic

The flag of the United Arab Emirates (Arabic: علم دولة الإمارات العربية المتحدة‎) contains the Pan-Arab colors red, green, white, and black. It was designed in 1971 by a 19-year-old Emirati, Abdullah Mohammed Al Maainah, and adopted on December 2, 1971.[1][2][3] The main theme of the flag's four colors is the unity of Arab nations. In 2008, there was a minor change to the Emblem.

Merchant ships may fly the alternative civil ensign, a red flag with the national flag in the canton.

All Emirates use the federal flag interchangeably as the flag of the emirate.

Colours[edit]

Historic photo depicting the first hoisting of the United Arab Emirates flag by the rulers of the emirates at The Union House, Dubai on 2 December 1971
Emirates airlines planes with the UAE flag on them

Meaning behind the colors[edit]

Scheme Textile colour
Red Unity between the Emirates[4]
White Peace, pure, clean and honesty[4]
Green Hope and prosperity[4]
Black Strength of the Mind[4]


Red White Green Black
RGB 255/0/0 255/255/255 0/115/43 0/0/0
Hexadecimal #FF0000 #FFFFFF #00732B #000000
CMYK 0/100/100/0 0/0/0/0 100/0/63/55 0/0/0/100

Gallery[edit]

Flag of each emirate[edit]

Each of the seven emirates within the United Arab Emirates originally had a common red plain flag as each emirate's banner, the red banner represents the descension to the prophet Muhammad. In 1820, six out of the seven emirates signed the General treaty agreement with the British Empire which compelled them to be under the British Protectorate rule and protection in the region. A white segment was enforced to be added to the hoist of each emirate's flag.

Fujairah was the only emirate which did not sign the general treaty in 1820 with the British protectorate and therefore continued to use its plain red flag.[5]

Abu Dhabi[edit]

Flag of Abu Dhabi

The flag of Abu Dhabi is a red flag with a white rectangle at the top-left corner. According to the 1820 General Maritime Treaty with the British, in times of war a full red flag would be used by the Bani Yas (Abu Dhabi and Dubai).[6] Although per the 1820 General Maritime Treaty with Britain Abu Dhabi was supposed to fly the Truical States flag, the White Pierced Red flag, in practice Abu Dhabi continued to fly a plain red flag. Percy Cox, the British Colonial Office administrator in the Middle East, was unsuccessful in convincing Zayed bin Khalifa Al Nahyan to adopt the Trucial States flag, which, Zayed argued, represented the Al Qawasim tribal federation.[7] Abu Dhabi later adopted a red flag with a top left white rectangle to distinguish it from the surrounding emirates.

Ajman and Dubai[edit]

Flag of Ajman and Dubai

The flags of Ajman and Dubai are identical. They are both plain red with a white bar at the hoist, i.e. closest to the flag staff.[8] The flag is known as the White Red Halved and was adopted as an alternative to the Sharjah and Ras Al Khaimah White Pierced Red by the Emirate of Dubai and Ajman to distinguish their authority from the Al Qawasim in defiance of the bonds of the 1820 General Maritime Treaty with the British.[9] To the British, this flag was titled as Truical Coast Flag No.1 and Abu Dhabi and Umm Al Quwain were also expected to adopt it.[10] According to the 1820 General Maritime Treaty with the British, in times of war a full red flag would be used by the Bani Yas (Abu Dhabi and Dubai).[6]

Fujairah[edit]

Flag of Fujairah from 1952

Before 1952, the flag of Fujairah was plain red. Fujairah did not sign the general treaty in 1820 with the British protectorate and therefore is still using its red plain flag.[5] In 1952, the emirate's name was added to the flag, and a red flag with a white Arabic calligraphy of the emirate name was adopted as an ensign to distinguish it from the surrounding emirates.

Ras Al Khaimah and Sharjah[edit]

Flag of Ras Al Khaimah and Sharjah

The flags of Ras Al Khaimah and Sharjah are identical as they are both ruled by two branches of the same house. They show a large red rectangle on a white background. The flag is known as the White Pierced Red and was the intended flag for all the Truical States according to the 1820 Maritime Treaty of the Truical States with the British. It was widely attributed to the Al Qawasim tribal federation. Percy Cox, the British Colonial Office administrator in the Middle East, was unsuccessful in convincing the rest of the emirates Sheikhs to adopt it.[11] To the British, this flag was titled as Truical Coast Flag No.2.[10] According to the 1820 General Maritime Treaty with the British, in times of war a green white and red flag would be used by the Qawasim.[12]

Umm Al Quwain[edit]

Flag of Umm Al Quwain

The flag of Umm Al Quwain consists of a red background, a white bar at the hoist similar the flags of Ajman and Dubai, and a large white star and crescent in the center as a symbol of Islam and representing allegiance to the Islamic world.[8] Umm Al Quwain flag was supposed to be the same flag used by Dubai and Ajman, the White Red Halved, but a star and crescent was added to distinguish it from the surrounding emirates.[10]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "UNITED ARAB EMIRATES | MAPS, TIME, HISTORY, LANGUAGE | UAE". www.vjcyber.com. Retrieved 2019-01-24.
  2. ^ "UAE flag - Colors, Meaning and Symbolism". edarabia.com. Retrieved 2019-01-24.
  3. ^ "8 Cool Facts about the UAE Flag". theculturetrip.com. Retrieved 2019-02-19.
  4. ^ a b c d "Flag of UAE–Colors, History, Meaning". Edarabia.
  5. ^ a b Complete Flags of the World. Smithsonian Handbooks. 2007. p. 184. ISBN 978-0-7566-4115-3.
  6. ^ a b Coll 30/15 'Anthems and Flags of Various States. Bahrein [Bahrain], Koweit [Kuwait], Muscat, Asir, Yemen, Qatar, Trucial, Oman' [61r] (107/261). British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers. p. 107.
  7. ^ Coll 30/15 'Anthems and Flags of Various States. Bahrein [Bahrain], Koweit [Kuwait], Muscat, Asir, Yemen, Qatar, Trucial, Oman' [61r] (103/261). British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers. p. 103.
  8. ^ a b Hawley, Donald. "The Trucial States". Twayne Publishers, New York, 1970. pp. 326-7.
  9. ^ Coll 30/15 'Anthems and Flags of Various States. Bahrein [Bahrain], Koweit [Kuwait], Muscat, Asir, Yemen, Qatar, Trucial, Oman' [61r] (151/261). British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers. 21 April 1932. p. 151.
  10. ^ a b c Coll 30/15 'Anthems and Flags of Various States. Bahrein [Bahrain], Koweit [Kuwait], Muscat, Asir, Yemen, Qatar, Trucial, Oman' [61r] (57/261). British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers. p. 57.
  11. ^ Coll 30/15 'Anthems and Flags of Various States. Bahrein [Bahrain], Koweit [Kuwait], Muscat, Asir, Yemen, Qatar, Trucial, Oman' [61r] (121/261). British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers. 4 June 1932. p. 121.
  12. ^ Coll 30/15 'Anthems and Flags of Various States. Bahrein [Bahrain], Koweit [Kuwait], Muscat, Asir, Yemen, Qatar, Trucial, Oman' [61r] (113/261). British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers. p. 113.

External links[edit]