Goof Bowyer

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Goof Bowyer
Biographical details
Born(1903-10-02)October 2, 1903
Tampa, Florida
DiedMay 19, 1988(1988-05-19) (aged 84)
Gainesville, Florida
Playing career
1926–1928Florida
Position(s)Quarterback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1929–1930Lakeland HS (FL) (assistant)
1931–1932Florida Southern
1933–1935Florida (backfield)
Basketball
1932Florida Southern
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1931–1932Florida Southern
Accomplishments and honors
Awards

Ernest J. "Goof" Bowyer (October 2, 1903 – May 19, 1988) was a college football player and coach.

Early years[edit]

Bowyer attended Lakeland High School, where he was quarterback of the South Florida champion 1923 team.[1][2]

University of Florida[edit]

Bowyer attended the University of Florida. He played for coach Tom Sebring and Charlie Bachman's Florida Gators football teams from 1925 to 1928. He was captain of the freshman team his first year, and captain of the varsity in his senior season. In 1927 he broke his leg against Georgia, and was elected captain one month later.[3] Bowyer was one of the school's greatest ever senior captains, leading what was remembered by many sports commentators as the best Florida football team until at least the 1960s.

Coaching career[edit]

After serving as an assistant for his former high school, Bowyer was hired as head football coach and athletic director for the Florida Southern Moccasins.[4] His 1932 basketball team posted a 10–3 record.[5] In 1933 Bowyer took over as the Florida Gators backfield coach after the departure of Joe Holsinger, his former backfield coach.

Death[edit]

He died on May 19, 1988.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mike Cobb. "1920s and '30s Saw the Start of Many Local Traditions".
  2. ^ "What is a Dreadnaught?".
  3. ^ Frank S. Wright (December 8, 1927). "Ernest Bowyer Given Highest Florida Honor". St. Petersburg Times. p. 3.
  4. ^ "Bowyer Named Southern Coach". The Palm Beach Post. January 11, 1931.
  5. ^ http://fscmocs.athleticsite.net/PDF/lynn_0208.pdf
  6. ^ "Bowyer services Tuesday". Gainesville Sun. May 21, 1988.