Guess What We Learned in School Today?

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Guess What We Learned in School Today?
Guess What We Learned in School Today.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed byJohn G. Avildsen
Produced byJames U. Clarke
Christopher C. Dewey
Dennis Friedland
David Gil
Written byEugene Price
StarringDick Carballo
Devin Goldenberg
Zachary Hains
Music byHarper MacKay
CinematographyJohn G. Avildsen
Edited byJohn G. Avildsen
Production
company
Distributed byMetro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Release date
19 May 1971
Running time
96 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

Guess What We Learned in School Today? (also released in the United States as I Ain't No Buffalo) is a 1970 film directed by John G. Avildsen and written by Eugene Price. The movie premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 1970 and opened in the United States in 1971. Although it was shot before Avildsen's Joe, it got distribution afterward due to Joe's success.

Tagline: "Love American style with a touch of X."

Plot[edit]

Parents in a small, conservative community want to ban sex education in schools, labeling it a Communist plot. However, the two people leading the charge against sex ed are revealed to be an impotent alcoholic and a gay policeman.

Principal cast[edit]

Actor Role
Dick Carballo (as Richard Carballo) Lt. Roger Manley
Devin Goldenberg Robbie Battle
Zachary Hains Lance Battle
Jane McLeod Rita Battle
Yvonne McCall Dr. Lily Whitehorn
Rosella Olsen Eve Manley
Diane Moore Lydia
Robert Emery Al

Critical reception[edit]

Roger Greenspun of The New York Times did not care for the film at all:

... [T]here are ineptitudes and unrewarding obscurities enough to sink the movie ... The movie it keeps trying to be, however, is an amalgam of social satire and sane sex propaganda and it succeeds with neither ... time and again it comes to look like a series of blackout skits from the more inhibited edges of an exploitation movie.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Original New York Times review". Movies.nytimes.com. Retrieved 5 October 2010.

External links[edit]