Gwynia

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Gwynia capsula
Temporal range: Pleistocene–Recent
Gwynia capsula cropped.jpg
Gwynia capsula, 1mm
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
Phylum:
Subphylum:
Class:
Order:
Suborder:
Superfamily:
Megathyridoidea
Family:
Megathyrididae
Genus:
Gwynia

King, 1859
Species:
G. capsula

Jeffreys, 1859[1]
Synonyms

Terebratula capsula

Gwynia capsula is a very small to minute brachiopod (maximally 1.5 millimetres or 0.059 inches long), currently known from the east Atlantic (France, Belgium, Netherlands, British Isles), but which occurred during the Pleistocene in what is now Norway. It has a translucent, whitish, purse-shaped shell with relatively large, wide-spaced pits (or punctae). It lives attached to stones or shells (fragments) in between large grains of sand. Like in all brachiopods, it filters food particles, chiefly diatoms and dinoflagellates. Gwynia capsula harbors a small number of larvae inside a brood pouch, but it has separate sexes, unlike also very small and pouch brooding Argyrotheca and Joania, which are hermaphrodite.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jeffreys J. G. (1859). "Further gleanings in British Conchology". Annals and Magazine of Natural History (series 3). 3:30–43, 106–120, pl. 2.
  2. ^ Moore, R.C. (1965). Brachiopoda. Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology. Part H., Volume 2. Boulder, Colorado/Lawrence, Kansas: Geological Society of America/University of Kansas Press. pp. H831–32. ISBN 0-8137-3015-5.