Hispanic and Latino conservatism in the United States

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Hispanic and Latino Americans make up an increasing share of the United States (U.S.) electorate. A record 29 million Latinos were eligible to vote in the 2018 midterm elections, accounting for 12.8% of all eligible voters, a new high. Latinos made up an estimated 11% of all voters nationwide on Election Day, nearly matching their share of the U.S. eligible voter population (U.S. citizens ages 18 and older).[1]

Hispanic/Latino Participation and Key Issues[edit]

The U.S. Census indicates that the Latino population of the U.S. is the fastest growing minority group in the country.[2] More than 12.8% of eligible voters nationwide are Latino.[3]

In the 2018 midterm elections, three out of four Latino voters supported a Democratic candidate.[4] However, Republicans enjoy strong support among Cuban-American and Venezuelan-American voters,[5] as well as among Latino voters in Florida and Texas.[6] Mexican-Americans, Puerto Ricans, Salvadoran-Americans, Guatemalan-Americans, and Dominican-Americans tend to support the Democratic Party. As the latter groups are far more numerous (Mexican-Americans alone are 64% of American Latinos),[7] the Democratic Party typically receives the majority of the Latino vote.

Although Latinos, as a whole, tend to support Democratic candidates, the Democratic Party has lost ground among Latino voters since its high-water mark in 2012.[8]

In 2006, 69% of Latino voters supported Democratic candidates in congressional races, while 30% supported Republican candidates.

In 2008, 67% of Latinos voted for Democratic presidential nominee Barack Obama, while 31% of Latinos voted for Republican presidential nominee John McCain.[9]

During the 2010 midterm elections, 31% of eligible Latino voters turned out to vote.[10] 60% of Latinos supported Democratic candidates, while 38% supported Republican candidates.[11] According to an October 2010 Pew Hispanic Center report, Hispanics ranked education, jobs, and health care as their top three issues of concern. Immigration ranked as the fourth most important issue for all Latinos.[12]

A 2012 study by the Center for Immigration Studies projected that in November 2012 Latinos would comprise 17.2% of the total U.S. population, 15% of adults, 11.2% of adult citizens, and 8.9% of voters. By comparison, the report found that in 2012, non-Latino whites are expected to be 73.4% of the national vote and non-Latino blacks are expected to be 12.2%. The report noted that by weight, "eight percentage points of the Hispanic vote nationally equals slightly less than one percentage point of the non-Hispanic white vote." The study also compared the 8.9% Latino share of voters to veterans (12% of the electorate), those with family incomes above $100,000 (18%), seniors 65 and older (19%), married persons (60%), and those who live in owner-occupied housing (80%).[13]

In terms of voter turnout, the Center for Immigration Studies projected that 52.7% (± 0.6) of eligible Latinos would vote in the 2012 election, an increase from 49.9% in 2008 and a continuation of the past decade's long upward trend. The projected Latino voter participation rate of 52.7% compares to 66.1% for non-Latino whites and 65.2% for non-Latino blacks in 2008.[13]

In 2012, 70% of Latino voters identified with, or leaned toward, the Democratic Party, while 20% of Latino voters identified with, or leaned toward, the Republican Party.[14]

In 2014, Latinos cast 6.8 million ballots out of 25 million eligible voters, for a voter turnout rate of 27%.[15]

During the 2016 Presidential Election, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump was supported by 57% of Cuban-American voters in Florida, while Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton received 40% of the vote.[16]

In 2018, 29.1 million Latino's were eligible to vote. 62% of Latino voters identified with, or leaned toward, the Democratic Party, whereas 27% of Latino voters identified with, or leaned toward, the Republican Party. Latino voters who primarily spoke English were more likely to support Republican candidates (33%), compared to voters who only spoke Spanish (15%).[17] In Florida, 66% of Latino's supported Republican gubernatorial nominee Ron DeSantis, while only 33% supported Democrat gubernatorial nominee Andrew Gillum, a 2 to 1 ratio for Republicans.[18]

According to a 2019 Gallup Poll, 29% of Latinos identify as Conservative, and that same number, 29%, voted for Donald Trump in the 2016 Presidential Election. [19]

Timeline of events[edit]

Susana Martinez
Marco Rubio
Ted Cruz
Brian Sandoval
Alberto Gonzales
Carlos Gutierrez
Rosario Marin
Anna Escobedo Cabral
Mel Martínez
Romualdo Pacheco

This is a timeline of significant events in Hispanic history which have shaped the conservative movement in the United States.

1860s
1870s
1880s
1890s
1900s
1910s
1920s
1960s
1970s
1980s
1990s
2000s
2010s

Politicians[edit]

Alaska[edit]

Arizona[edit]

Arkansas[edit]

California[edit]

Colorado[edit]

Connecticut[edit]

Delaware[edit]

Florida[edit]

Georgia[edit]

Hawaii[edit]

Illinois[edit]

Indiana[edit]

Iowa[edit]

Kansas[edit]

Kentucky[edit]

Louisiana[edit]

Massachusetts[edit]

Michigan[edit]

Minnesota[edit]

Missouri[edit]

Nebraska[edit]

Nevada[edit]

New Hampshire[edit]

New Jersey[edit]

New Mexico[edit]

New York[edit]

Ohio[edit]

Oklahoma[edit]

Oregon[edit]

Tennessee[edit]

Texas[edit]

Virginia[edit]

Washington[edit]

West Virginia[edit]

Wisconsin[edit]

Wyoming[edit]

Judges[edit]

Athletes and entertainers[edit]

Law[edit]

Science[edit]

Columnists, authors and journalists[edit]

Education and Business[edit]

Activists[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Hispanic voters and the 2018 midterm elections". Pew Research.
  2. ^ "US Census Press Releases". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2008-05-06. Retrieved 2008-05-16.
  3. ^ "Hispanic voters and the 2018 midterm elections". Pew Research.
  4. ^ "Latinos and the political parties". Pew Research.
  5. ^ "The Cuban Paradox". Harvard University.
  6. ^ "Latinos and the political parties". Pew Research.
  7. ^ "Detailed Hispanic Origin: 2006" (PDF). Pew Hispanic Center. Retrieved 2008-05-16.
  8. ^ "Hispanic voters and the 2018 midterm elections". Pew Research.
  9. ^ Lopez, Mark Hung (November 5, 2008). "The Hispanic Vote in the 2008 Election". Pew Hispanic Center. Pew Research Center.
  10. ^ "Hispanic voters and the 2018 midterm elections". Pew Research.
  11. ^ Lopez, Mark Hugo (November 3, 2010). "The Latino Vote in the 2010 Elections". Pew Hispanic Center. Pew Research Center.
  12. ^ Statistics were obtained from CNN’s Election 2010 website and are based on the Edison Research’s national and state exit poll surveys of voters as reported on December 30, 2010.
  13. ^ a b Steven A. Camarota and Karen Zeigler, "Projecting the 2012 Hispanic Vote," Center for Immigration Studies, August 2012. Available at: http://cis.org/projecting-2012-hispanic-vote-nationally-battleground-states
  14. ^ "Hispanic voters and the 2018 midterm elections". Pew Research.
  15. ^ "Hispanic voters and the 2018 midterm elections". Pew Research.
  16. ^ "Republicans won the Florida Election but the Cuban-American Voters are Beginning to Vote Democrat". www.necn.com/news. NECN. Retrieved March 13, 2019.
  17. ^ "Hispanic voters and the 2018 midterm elections". Pew Research.
  18. ^ "Republicans won the Florida Election but the Cuban-American Voters are Beginning to Vote Democrat". www.necn.com/news. NECN. Retrieved March 13, 2019.
  19. ^ Parker, Star. "Can Republicans Get Elected in Nonwhite America?". GOPUSA. Retrieved March 13, 2019.
  20. ^ https://ballotpedia.org/Carlos_Gonzalez_(New_Hampshire)
  21. ^ a b c d e Moreno, Carolina (27 August 2012). "LOOK: Are These Latino Celebs Republicans?". Huffington Post.
  22. ^ Moreno, Carolina (27 August 2012). "LOOK: Are These Latino Celebs Republicans?". Huffington Post.
  23. ^ http://www.thecubanhistory.com/2014/09/cesar-romero-actor-singer-dancer-film-radio-and-tv-personality-cuban-descendant-cesar-romero-actor-cantante-bailarin-personalidad-de-la-radio-cine-y-tv-descendencia-cubana. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  24. ^ "Republican Nominee Bush Works Hard for Latino Vote". 2006-01-06.