Huntington County, Indiana

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Huntington County
Huntington County Courthouse in Huntington
Huntington County Courthouse in Huntington
Map of Indiana highlighting Huntington County
Location within the U.S. state of Indiana
Map of the United States highlighting Indiana
Indiana's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 40°50′N 85°29′W / 40.83°N 85.49°W / 40.83; -85.49
Country United States
State Indiana
Founded2 February 1832 (authorized)
5 May 1834 (organized)
Named forSamuel Huntington
SeatHuntington
Largest cityHuntington
Area
 • Total387.72 sq mi (1,004.2 km2)
 • Land382.65 sq mi (991.1 km2)
 • Water5.07 sq mi (13.1 km2)  1.31%%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2018)
36,240
 • Density94.7/sq mi (36.6/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district3rd
Websitewww.huntington.in.us/county/
Indiana county number 35

Huntington County is a county in the U.S. state of Indiana. According to the 2010 United States Census, the population was 37,124.[1] The county seat (and only city) is Huntington.[2]

Huntington County comprises the Huntington, IN Micropolitan Statistical Area and is included in the Fort Wayne–Huntington–Auburn Combined Statistical Area

History[edit]

The city of Huntington from the southwest

Huntington County was organized from previously unorganized Indiana territory and lands gained by the Adams New Purchase of 1818. The county's creation was authorized by act of the Indiana State legislature dated 2 February 1832. Organization of the county's governing structure began on 5 May 1834.[3] The county was named for Samuel Huntington, who signed the Declaration of Independence and the Articles of Confederation.[4] He was also President of the Continental Congress under the Articles of Confederation.

Geography[edit]

The terrain of Huntington County consists of low rolling hills, completely devoted to agriculture or urban development. The Wabash River flows to the west through the upper central part of the county, while the Salamonie River flows to the west through the lower part.[5] Its highest point (about 925'/282 meters ASL) is at the SW corner.[6] According to the 2010 census, the county has a total area of 387.72 square miles (1,004.2 km2), of which 382.65 square miles (991.1 km2) (or 98.69%) is land and 5.07 square miles (13.1 km2) (or 1.31%) is water.[7]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Highways[edit]

City and towns[edit]

Townships[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Protected areas[edit]

  • JE Roush Fish and Wildlife Area[5]
  • Lost Bridge State Recreation Area[5]

Notable people[edit]

Public Servants[edit]

  • Sam Cook (1860–1946), US Congressman
  • J. Danforth Quayle, US Representative, Senator, Vice-President
  • J. Edward Roush (1920–2004), US Representative, Father of "911"
  • John R. Kissinger (1877–1946), early Malaria test subject

Celebrities[edit]

  • Chris Schenkel (1923–2005), sportscaster
  • Denny Jiosa, jazz guitarist and composer
  • Archbishop John F. Noll (1875–1956), founded Catholic newspaper 'Our Sunday Visitor'. Founded Victory Noll and St. Felix Monastery.
  • Sandy Thomson, Chief Weather Specialist, WANE-TV Fort Wayne

Artists[edit]

  • Mick Mars, guitarist for Mötley Crüe.
  • Eiffel G. Plasterer (fl. 1950s), pioneer in soap bubble art

Athletes[edit]

  • Gary Dilley, Tokyo Olympics swimmer
  • George Haines, Olympic Women's Swim coach
  • Glen S. Hummer, Tokyo Olympics Men's Swim coach
  • W.L. Seibold, national horseshoe champion
  • Mark Seibold, World horseshoe champion (1966, 1969, 1979, 1986)
  • Ned Steele, 1938 national Ping Pong champion.[8]
  • Steve Platt, basketball player and former coach at Huntington University. Indiana's all-time collegiate scoring leader (3,700 points), placing him seventh on the list of all-time collegiate scorers at any level. Led the nation in scoring (1973, 1974).
  • Lisa Winter, basketball player at Ball State University and Valparaiso University. Indiana's Miss Basketball 1996.
  • Matt Pike, football player at Purdue University and in the Arena Football League, 1999–Present. Won AF2 Title with Peoria in 2002.
  • Chris Kramer, professional basketball player. Kramer played college basketball at Purdue University where he was two-time Big Ten Defensive Player of the Year.

Points of interest[edit]

Education[edit]

School district[edit]

Private schools[edit]

Higher education[edit]

News and Media[edit]

Newspapers[edit]

Radio[edit]

Climate and weather[edit]

Huntington, Indiana
Climate chart (explanation)
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D
 
 
2
 
 
32
16
 
 
1.8
 
 
37
18
 
 
2.9
 
 
48
28
 
 
3.4
 
 
61
38
 
 
4.1
 
 
73
48
 
 
4.4
 
 
83
58
 
 
3.6
 
 
87
62
 
 
3.6
 
 
84
60
 
 
2.8
 
 
78
52
 
 
2.8
 
 
65
41
 
 
2.9
 
 
50
32
 
 
2.8
 
 
38
22
Average max. and min. temperatures in °F
Precipitation totals in inches
Source: The Weather Channel[9]

In recent years, average temperatures in Huntington have ranged from a low of 16 °F (−9 °C) in January to a high of 87 °F (31 °C) in July, although a record low of −28 °F (−33 °C) was recorded in January 1982 and a record high of 105 °F (41 °C) was recorded in June 1988. Average monthly precipitation ranged from 1.82 inches (46 mm) in February to 4.37 inches (111 mm) in June.[9]

Government[edit]

The county government is a constitutional body, and is granted specific powers by the Constitution of Indiana, and by the Indiana Code.

County Council: The fiscal branch of the county government; controls spending and revenue collection in the county. Representatives, elected to four-year terms from county districts, are responsible for setting salaries, the annual budget, and special spending. The council has limited authority to impose local taxes, in the form of an income and property tax that is subject to state level approval, excise taxes, and service taxes.[10][11]

Board of Commissioners: The executive and legislative body of the county. The commissioners are elected county-wide to staggered four-year terms. One commissioner serves as president. The commissioners are charged with collecting revenue and managing the county government.[10][11]

Court: The county maintains a small claims court that handles civil cases. The judge on the court is elected to a term of four years and must be a member of the Indiana Bar Association. The judge is assisted by a constable who is also elected to a four-year term. In some cases, court decisions can be appealed to the state level circuit court.[11]

County Officials: The county has other elected offices, including sheriff, coroner, auditor, treasurer, recorder, surveyor, and circuit court clerk. These officers are elected to four-year terms. Members elected to county government positions are required to declare party affiliations and to be residents of the county.[11]

Huntington County is part of Indiana's 3rd congressional district; Indiana Senate districts 17 and 19;[12] and Indiana House of Representatives district 50.[13]

Presidential Election Analysis: Huntington County has been strongly Republican; Lyndon B. Johnson was the last Democratic Party candidate to carry the county (1964).

Presidential election results
Presidential elections results[14]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 72.0% 11,649 21.7% 3,506 6.3% 1,026
2012 68.8% 10,862 29.1% 4,596 2.2% 339
2008 62.9% 10,291 35.7% 5,843 1.4% 223
2004 74.3% 11,617 24.8% 3,877 0.9% 133
2000 69.2% 10,113 28.2% 4,119 2.7% 388
1996 58.8% 8,275 30.5% 4,287 10.8% 1,513
1992 56.8% 9,093 24.1% 3,855 19.1% 3,065
1988 74.9% 11,675 24.8% 3,873 0.3% 46
1984 69.8% 10,805 29.7% 4,598 0.5% 84
1980 59.6% 9,497 34.0% 5,415 6.4% 1,025
1976 57.8% 9,182 41.0% 6,515 1.2% 193
1972 68.5% 10,858 31.0% 4,908 0.6% 89
1968 54.5% 9,002 37.8% 6,238 7.8% 1,283
1964 44.2% 7,438 55.3% 9,308 0.6% 98
1960 59.4% 10,658 40.0% 7,163 0.6% 109
1956 64.2% 11,024 35.1% 6,027 0.8% 133
1952 62.0% 10,508 36.1% 6,114 2.0% 331
1948 52.0% 8,178 45.8% 7,202 2.2% 343
1944 57.2% 8,668 40.4% 6,128 2.4% 370
1940 55.2% 9,110 43.8% 7,220 1.0% 167
1936 44.8% 7,024 53.3% 8,361 2.0% 312
1932 42.9% 6,791 55.0% 8,697 2.1% 333
1928 58.9% 8,323 40.2% 5,678 1.0% 135
1924 51.4% 7,437 38.1% 5,506 10.5% 1,519
1920 53.7% 8,100 43.1% 6,506 3.2% 487
1916 45.7% 3,761 46.6% 3,833 7.7% 631
1912 28.2% 2,108 41.7% 3,119 30.1% 2,249
1908 47.6% 3,973 44.5% 3,712 7.9% 659
1904 52.5% 4,385 39.4% 3,290 8.1% 674
1900 51.0% 4,122 45.6% 3,691 3.4% 275
1896 51.3% 4,117 46.7% 3,750 2.0% 157
1892 46.7% 3,384 47.7% 3,460 5.6% 409
1888 49.2% 3,559 48.2% 3,481 2.6% 189

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18401,579
18507,850397.2%
186014,86789.4%
187019,03628.0%
188021,80514.5%
189027,64426.8%
190028,9014.5%
191028,9820.3%
192031,6719.3%
193029,073−8.2%
194029,9313.0%
195031,4004.9%
196033,8147.7%
197034,9703.4%
198035,5961.8%
199035,427−0.5%
200038,0757.5%
201037,124−2.5%
Est. 201836,240<ref">"Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved July 26, 2019.</ref>−2.4%
US Decennial Census[15]
1790–1960[16] 1900–1990[17]
1990–2000[18] 2010–2013[1]

2010 census[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 37,124 people, 14,218 households, and 10,074 families in the county.[19] The population density was 97.0 inhabitants per square mile (37.5/km2). There were 15,805 housing units at an average density of 41.3 per square mile (15.9/km2).[7] The racial makeup of the county was 97.1% white, 0.4% Asian, 0.4% American Indian, 0.4% black or African American, 0.5% from other races, and 1.1% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.7% of the population.[19] In terms of ancestry, 37.9% were German, 14.9% were Irish, 12.9% were American, and 12.1% were English.[20]

Of the 14,218 households, 32.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.5% were married couples living together, 9.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 29.1% were non-families, and 24.4% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 2.97. The median age was 39.0 years.[19]

The median income for a household in the county was $47,697 and the median income for a family was $55,630. Males had a median income of $41,648 versus $30,218 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,575. About 7.7% of families and 11.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.6% of those under age 18 and 9.8% of those age 65 or over.[21]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Huntington County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 7 June 2011. Retrieved 20 September 2011.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 31 May 2011. Retrieved 7 June 2011.
  3. ^ History of Huntington County, Indiana: From the Earliest Time to The Present . . Walsworth Publishing Co. January 1887. p. 321.
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 163.
  5. ^ a b c Huntington County IN (Google Maps, accessed 28 July 2020)
  6. ^ Huntington County High Point, Indiana (PeakBagger.com, accessed 28 July 2020)
  7. ^ a b "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 12 February 2020. Retrieved 10 July 2015.
  8. ^ "Huntington County, Indiana". Turner Publishing Co. 7 April 1993. Retrieved 7 April 2018 – via Google Books.
  9. ^ a b "Monthly Averages for Huntington IN". The Weather Channel. Retrieved 27 January 2011.
  10. ^ a b Indiana Code. "Title 36, Article 2, Section 3". IN.gov. Retrieved 16 September 2008.
  11. ^ a b c d Indiana Code. "Title 2, Article 10, Section 2" (PDF). IN.gov. Retrieved 16 September 2008.
  12. ^ "Indiana Senate Districts". State of Indiana. Retrieved 28 July 2020.
  13. ^ "Indiana House Districts" (PDF). State of Indiana. Retrieved 28 July 2020.
  14. ^ Leip, David. "Atlas of US Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 7 April 2018.
  15. ^ "US Decennial Census". US Census Bureau. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  16. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  17. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". US Census Bureau. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  18. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). US Census Bureau. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  19. ^ a b c "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 13 February 2020. Retrieved 10 July 2015.
  20. ^ "Selected Social Characteristics in the US – 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 14 February 2020. Retrieved 10 July 2015.
  21. ^ "Selected Economic Characteristics – 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 14 February 2020. Retrieved 10 July 2015.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 40°50′N 85°29′W / 40.83°N 85.49°W / 40.83; -85.49