IL17RD

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
IL17RD
Identifiers
AliasesIL17RD, HH18, IL-17RD, IL17RLM, SEF, interleukin 17 receptor D
External IDsOMIM: 606807 MGI: 2159727 HomoloGene: 9717 GeneCards: IL17RD
Gene location (Human)
Chromosome 3 (human)
Chr.Chromosome 3 (human)[1]
Chromosome 3 (human)
Genomic location for IL17RD
Genomic location for IL17RD
Band3p14.3Start57,089,982 bp[1]
End57,170,306 bp[1]
Orthologs
SpeciesHumanMouse
Entrez
Ensembl
UniProt
RefSeq (mRNA)

NM_017563
NM_001318864

NM_027265
NM_134437

RefSeq (protein)

NP_001305793
NP_060033

NP_602319

Location (UCSC)Chr 3: 57.09 – 57.17 MbChr 14: 27.04 – 27.11 Mb
PubMed search[3][4]
Wikidata
View/Edit HumanView/Edit Mouse

Interleukin 17 receptor D is a protein that in humans is encoded by the IL17RD gene. [5]

Function[edit]

This gene encodes a membrane protein belonging to the interleukin-17 receptor (IL-17R) protein family. The encoded protein is a component of the interleukin-17 receptor signaling complex, and the interaction between this protein and IL-17R does not require the interleukin. The gene product also affects fibroblast growth factor signaling, inhibiting or stimulating growth through MAPK/ERK signaling. Alternate splicing generates multiple transcript variants encoding distinct isoforms.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ENSG00000144730 - Ensembl, May 2017
  2. ^ a b c GRCm38: Ensembl release 89: ENSMUSG00000040717 - Ensembl, May 2017
  3. ^ "Human PubMed Reference:". National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  4. ^ "Mouse PubMed Reference:". National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  5. ^ "Entrez Gene: Interleukin 17 receptor D". Retrieved 2016-04-17.

Further reading[edit]

  • Kovalenko D, Yang X, Nadeau RJ, Harkins LK, Friesel R (2003). "Sef inhibits fibroblast growth factor signaling by inhibiting FGFR1 tyrosine phosphorylation and subsequent ERK activation". J. Biol. Chem. 278 (16): 14087–91. doi:10.1074/jbc.C200606200. PMID 12604616.


This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.