Illuy (cantillation)

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Illuy
עִלּוּי ֬ דָּבָ֬ר
cantillation
Sof passuk ׃   paseq ׀
etnachta ֑   segol ֒
shalshelet ֓   zaqef qatan ֔
zaqef gadol ֕   tifcha ֖
rivia ֗   zarqa ֘
pashta ֙   yetiv ֚
tevir ֛   geresh ֜
geresh muqdam [de] ֝   gershayim ֞
qarney para ֟   telisha gedola ֠
pazer ֡   atnah hafukh [de] ֢
munach ֣   mahapakh ֤
merkha ֥   merkha kefula ֦
darga ֧   qadma ֨
telisha qetana ֩   yerah ben yomo ֪
ole ֫   illuy ֬
dehi [de] ֭   zinor ֮

The Illuy or Iluy (Hebrew: עִלּוּי‎) is a Trope (from Yiddish טראָפּ "trop") in the Judaic Liturgy. It is one of the cantillation marks used in the three poetic books: Job, the Book of Proverbs, and the Psalms. Accordingly, it is a special mark belonging to the Ta'amei Sifrei Emet (meaning, the accent signs of the books of truth).

Symbol[edit]

The symbol of Illuy ( ֬‎ ) is the same as that of Munach ( ֣‎ ), except that the Illuy is positioned above the Hebrew letter, while the Munach is positioned below it.

In the Yemeni tradition the Illuy is also called the "Shofar illuy" Hebrew: שׁוֹפָר עִלּ֣וּי‎. However, "Shofar illuy" means Munach in the Italian tradition.

Description[edit]

The Hebrew word עִלּוּי‎ is a derivative of the word עִלִּי‎ (meaning "upper" or "top"), hence its position above the letter.

Occurrences[edit]

The Trope Illuy occurs in only three books.

Part of the Tanach Illuy
Book of Job 20
Proverbs 14
Psalms 146
Total 180

Literature[edit]

  • William Wickes: A treatise on the accentuation of the three so-called poetical books on the Old Testament, Psalms, Proverbs, and Job. 1881 (Illuy is available for free download at the Internet Archive).
  • William Wickes: A treatise on the accentuation of the twenty-one so-called prose books of the Old Testament. 1887 (Illuy is available for free download at the Internet Archive).
  • Arthur Davis: The Hebrew accents of the twenty-one Books of the Bible (K"A Sefarim) with a new introduction. 1900 (Illuy is available for free download at the Internet Archive).
  • Francis L. Cohen (1906). "Cantillation". In Isidore Singer (ed.). The Jewish Encyclopedia. Volume III. New York: KTAV Publishing House. pp. 542–548. |volume= has extra text (help)
  • Solomon Rosowsky (1957). The Cantillation of the Bible. The Five Books of Moses. New York: The Reconstructionist Press.
  • James D. Price (1996). Concordance of the Hebrew accents in the Hebrew Bible. Volume I: Concordance of the Hebrew Accents used in the Pentateuch. Lewiston, New York: Edwin Mellon Press. ISBN 0-7734-2395-8. |volume= has extra text (help)
  • Joshua R. Jacobson (2002). Chanting the Hebrew Bible. The art of cantillation (1. ed.). Philadelphia: Jewish Publication Society. ISBN 0-8276-0693-1.
  • Joshua R. Jacobson (2005). Chanting the Hebrew Bible. Student Edition. Philadelphia: The Jewish Publication Society. ISBN 0-8276-0816-0.


References[edit]