Jack Collins (umpire)

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Jack Collins
Personal information
Full nameJohn Richard Collins
Born (1932-08-01) 1 August 1932 (age 88)
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
RoleUmpire
Umpiring information
Tests umpired5 (1972–1975)
ODIs umpired1 (1979)
FC umpired41 (1965–1975)
LA umpired9 (1970–1979)
Source: CricketArchive, 5 July 2013

John Richard (Jack) Collins (born 1 August 1932) was an Australian cricket Test match umpire.[1]

He umpired five Test matches between 1972 and 1975. His first match was between Australia and Pakistan at Melbourne on 29 December 1972 to 3 January 1973, won by Australia by 92 runs. Collins' partner in this match was Peter Enright, also standing in his first Test match.

In the preceding season, 1971/72, a scheduled tour of Australia by South Africa was cancelled following political and moral protests against the apartheid policies of the South African government. In its place a 'World Team' visited Australia and played a series of Test standard, although never officially recognised. Collins stood in one of these matches, and witnessed Garfield Sobers score 254, an innings he later regarded as the greatest he ever saw.

Collins' last Test match was between Australia and the West Indies at Melbourne on 26 December to 30 December 1975, won by Australia by 8 wickets. Collins' colleague was Robin Bailhache. At the conclusion of the match, the West Indian captain Clive Lloyd strongly criticised Collins umpiring, requesting that he be replaced for the final test.[2] Collins would never umpire another first-class match and was upset that he wasn't publicly supported by the Australian Cricket Board or the Victorian Cricket Association.[3]

Collins also umpired one One Day International match in 1979.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Jack Collins". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 16 May 2014.
  2. ^ Beams, Percy (31 December 1975). "Lloyd attacks umpire". The Age.
  3. ^ Smith, Patrick (22 July 1982). "Loud shouts - and the umpire was out". The Age.

External links[edit]