KPOL (TV)

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KPOL
Tucson, Arizona
ChannelsAnalog: 40 (UHF)
Affiliationsdefunct, frequency now used by KHRR
OwnerJP Communications, Inc.
(Julius and David Polan)
First air dateJanuary 5, 1985[1]
Last air dateOctober 17, 1989
Former affiliationsindependent (1985-1989)
Transmitter power1550 kW
Height619 m
Facility ID30601
Transmitter coordinates32°14′55.7″N 111°7′0.3″W / 32.248806°N 111.116750°W / 32.248806; -111.116750

KPOL was an independent television station in Tucson, Arizona, broadcasting on UHF channel 40.

History[edit]

KPOL came into existence on November 28, 1983 with the grant of a permit to construct a full-service station on UHF channel 40 to serve the Tucson area. The station signed on January 5, 1985 as an English-language general entertainment independent station owned by the Polan family, and was licensed on November 20, 1985.[1] Earlier that week, KDTU (now KTTU-TV) signed on the air, and over time, KPOL couldn't compete in what was then an overcrowded market. KDTU, across town, had similar problems. That station was put up for sale in the fall of 1988. KDTU considered going dark in the event a buyer could not be found and plans were for KPOL to pick up KDTU's stronger programming. That station was sold to Clear Channel Communications early in 1989 instead. That station became more aggressive with programming and KPOL continued to have more financial problems. The station signed off October 17, 1989.

In 1991, local Tucson businessman Jay Zucker purchased the dormant KPOL license out of bankruptcy, and on July 1, 1992, channel 40 was reactivated as Telemundo affiliate KHRR.

Programming[edit]

As an independent station, KPOL aired an eclectic mix of programming, including cartoons, drama shows, old movies, westerns, and religious programs, and was Tucson's home for Phoenix Suns basketball broadcasts and World Class Championship Wrestling.[1]

See also[edit]

KHRR

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "New Tucson TV Stations", Casa Grande Dispatch, p. 13, 1984-12-31