Latin American and Caribbean Group

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Latin American and Caribbean Group
Emblem of the United Nations.svg
Formation1964; 55 years ago (1964)
TypeRegional Group
Legal statusActive
A coloured voting box.svg Politics portal

The Group of Latin America and Caribbean Countries, or GRULAC, is one of the five United Nations Regional Groups composed of 33 Member States from Central and South America, as well as some islands in the West Indies. Its members compose 17% of all United Nations members.

The Group, as with all the regional groups, is a non-binding dialogue group where subjects concerning regional and international matters are discussed. Additionally, the Group works to help allocates seats on United Nations bodies by nominating candidates from the region.[1][2]

Member States[edit]

The Latin American and Caribbean Group Member States.

The following are the Member States of the Latin American and Caribbean Group:[3][4]

Representation[edit]

Security Council[edit]

The Latin American and Caribbean Group currently holds two seats on the Security Council, both non-permanent. The current members of the Security Council from the Group are:[5]

Country Term
 Peru 2018–2019
 Dominican Republic 2019–2020

Economic and Social Council[edit]

The Latin American and Caribbean Group currently holds 10 seats on the United Nations Economic and Social Council. The current members of the Economic and Social Council from the Group are:[6]

Country Term
 Colombia 2017–2019
 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2017–2019
 Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of) 2017–2019
 Ecuador 2018–2020
 El Salvador 2018–2020
 Mexico 2018–2020
 Uruguay 2018–2020
 Brazil 2019–2021
 Jamaica 2019–2021
 Paraguay 2019–2021

Human Rights Council[edit]

The Latin American and Caribbean Group currently holds eight seats on the United Nations Human Rights Council. The current members of the Economic and Social Council from the Group are:[7]

Country Term
 Brazil 2017–2019
 Cuba 2017–2019
 Chile 2018–2020
 Mexico 2018–2020
 Peru 2018–2020
 Argentina 2019–2021
 Bahamas 2019–2021
 Uruguay 2019–2021

Presidency of the General Assembly[edit]

Every five years in the years ending in 3 and 8, the Latin American and Caribbean Group is eligible to elect a president to the General Assembly.[8]

The following is a list of presidents from the Greoup since its official creation in 1963:[9]

Year Elected Session Name of President Country Note
1963 18th Carlos Sosa Rodríguez  Venezuela
1968 23rd Emilio Arenales Catalán  Guatemala
1973 28th Leopoldo Benítes  Ecuador Also chaired the sixth special session of the General Assembly
1978 33rd Indalecio Liévano  Colombia
1983 38th Jorge E. Illueca  Panama
1988 43rd Dante M. Caputo  Argentina
1993 48th Samuel R. Insanally  Guyana
1998 53rd Didier Opertti  Uruguay Also chaired the 10th emergency special session of the General Assembly
2003 58th Julian Robert Hunte  Saint Lucia
2008 63rd Miguel d’Escoto Brockmann  Nicaragua
2013 68th John W. Ashe  Antigua and Barbuda
2018 73rd María Fernanda Espinosa  Ecuador
2023 78th TBD TBD

Role[edit]

The Group plays a major role in promoting the region's interests. It provides a forum for Member States to exchange opinions on international issues, carry out follow-up on the topics that are being discussed in international organisations, build common positions on complex issues and prepare statements reflecting the joint position of the Group.[1][10]

However, most importantly, the Group allows for the discussion and coordination of support for candidates for different United nations organisations from the region.[2]

Regular meetings of the Group take place in Geneva. The most common topics discussed at these meetings are human rights, environment, intellectual property, labour rights, trade and development and telecommunications.[1]

Locations[edit]

The Group maintains various offices across the globe:[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Latin American and Caribbean Group (GRULAC)". Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Colombia. Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Colombia. n.d. Retrieved 28 February 2019.
  2. ^ a b Agam, Hasmy, and Sam Daws, Terence O'Brien and Ramesh Takur (26 March 1999). What is Equitable Geographic Representation in the Twenty-First Century (PDF) (Report). United Nations University. Retrieved 27 February 2019.CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  3. ^ "United Nations Regional Groups of Member States". United Nations Department for General Assembly and Conference management. United Nations. n.d. Retrieved 28 February 2019.
  4. ^ United Nations Handbook 2018–19 (PDF) (56 ed.). Wellington: Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade of New Zealand. 2018. pp. 15–17. ISSN 0110-1951.
  5. ^ "Current Members". United Nations Security Council. United Nations. n.d. Retrieved 28 February 2019.
  6. ^ "Members". United Nations Economic and Social Council. United Nations. n.d. Retrieved 26 February 2019.
  7. ^ "Current Membership of the Human Rights Council, 1 January - 31 December 2019 by regional groups". United Nations Human Rights Council. United Nations. n.d. Retrieved 26 February 2019.
  8. ^ Wanza, Serah N. (27 November 2017). "What Are The Five Regional Groups of the United Nations?". Worldatlas. Worldatlas. Retrieved 26 February 2019.
  9. ^ "Past Presidents". United Nations General Assembly. United Nations. n.d. Retrieved 27 February 2019.
  10. ^ "Group of Latin American and Caribbean Countries in the United Nations (GRULAC)". Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. n.d. Archived from the original on 25 October 2014. Retrieved 28 February 2019.