List of Armenian Olympic medalists

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Soviet gymnast Albert Azaryan (pictured on a 2009 postage stamp) is the most decorated Armenian Olympian of all time with three gold and one silver medals.
Mkrtich Mkryan
Vahram Papazyan
Mkrtich Mkryan (left) and Vahram Papazyan (right) from the Ottoman Empire were the first Armenians to compete in the modern Olympic Games.[1]

Due to historical and political reasons,[a] only a small portion of Armenian athletes and athletes of Armenian descent have competed for Armenia. Armenian kings Tiridates III and Varazdat were recorded as champions in the Ancient Olympic Games. The first Armenians to participate in modern Olympics were athletes Mkrtich Mkryan and Vahram Papazyan, who represented the Ottoman Empire at the 1912 Stockholm Games.[1] The first Armenian to win a medal was Hal Haig Prieste, a son of Armenian immigrants, who won a bronze medal in diving at the 1920 Antwerp Games for the United States.[2] Soviet Armenian gymnast Hrant Shahinyan became the first Armenian gold medalist of the modern Olympics in 1952.

From 1952 to 1988, most Armenian athletes represented the Soviet Union. Although Armenia became an independent state in 1991, during the 1992 Barcelona Games Armenia and other former Soviet states (except the Baltic states) were part of the Unified Team. The National Olympic Committee of Armenia was founded in 1990 and became an International Olympic Committee member in 1993.[3] Since the 1994 Winter Olympics in Lillehammer, the Republic of Armenia participates separately, but some Armenian athletes still compete under foreign flags, including ethnic Armenians born abroad and those who emigrated from Armenia.

Ancient Olympic Games[edit]

One of the most prominent Armenian kings, Tiridates III, who is best known for adopting Christianity as Armenia's state religion in 301, became a champion in wrestling in the 265th Olympics in 281 at age 22-23.[4] King of Armenia Varazdat (Varasdates) from the Arshakuni dynasty, who reigned between 374 and 378,[5] is the last known champion of the Ancient Olympic Games. He became a champion in fisticuffs at the 291st Olympic Games in 385 A.D., seven years after leaving the Armenian throne.[6][b]

Modern Olympics[edit]

Summer Olympics[edit]

Medal Name Country Games Sport Event Ref
 Bronze Hal Haig Prieste United States United States 1920 Antwerp Diving Men's 10 metre platform
[2]
 Gold Hrant Shahinyan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1952 Helsinki Gymnastics Men's team all-around
[20][21]
 Silver Hrant Shahinyan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1952 Helsinki Gymnastics Men's individual all-around
[20][21]
 Gold Hrant Shahinyan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1952 Helsinki Gymnastics Men's rings
[21]
 Silver Hrant Shahinyan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1952 Helsinki Gymnastics Men's pommel horse
[21]
 Gold Rafael Chimishkyan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1952 Helsinki Weightlifting Men's Featherweight
[22]
 Bronze Artem Teryan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1952 Helsinki Wrestling Men's Greco-Roman Bantamweight
[23]
 Gold Vladimir Yengibaryan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1956 Melbourne Boxing Men's Light Welterweight
[24]
 Gold Albert Azaryan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1956 Melbourne Gymnastics Men's team all-around
[25]
 Gold Albert Azaryan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1956 Melbourne Gymnastics Men's Rings
[25]
 Gold Nikita Simonyan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1956 Melbourne Football Men's tournament
[26]
 Bronze Boris Markarov Soviet Union Soviet Union 1956 Melbourne Water polo Men's tournament
[27]
 Bronze Igor Ter-Ovanesyan[28] Soviet Union Soviet Union 1960 Rome Athletics Men's long jump
[29]
 Gold Albert Azaryan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1960 Rome Gymnastics Men's rings
[25]
 Silver Albert Azaryan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1960 Rome Gymnastics Men's team all-around
[25]
 Bronze Igor Ter-Ovanesyan[28] Soviet Union Soviet Union 1964 Tokyo Athletics Men's long jump
[29]
 Silver Armenak Alachachian Soviet Union Soviet Union 1964 Tokyo Basketball Men's basketball
[30]
 Gold Norair Nurikyan Bulgaria Bulgaria 1972 Munich Weightlifting Men's Featherweight
[31]
 Silver Edvard Mikaelian Soviet Union Soviet Union 1972 Munich Gymnastics Men's artistic team all-around
[32]
 Bronze Arkady Andreasyan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1972 Munich Football Men's tournament
[33]
 Bronze Oganes Zanazanyan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1972 Munich Football Men's tournament
[34]
 Gold Norair Nurikyan Bulgaria Bulgaria 1976 Montreal Weightlifting Men's Bantamweight
[31]
 Silver Vardan Militosyan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1976 Montreal Weightlifting Men's middleweight
[35]
 Silver Nelson Davidyan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1976 Montreal Wrestling Men's Greco-Roman 62 kg
[36]
 Gold Suren Nalbandyan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1976 Montreal Wrestling Men's Greco-Roman 68 kg
[37]
 Bronze Anushavan Gassan-Dzhalilov Soviet Union Soviet Union 1976 Montreal Rowing Men's coxless fours
[38]
 Silver Nina Muradyan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1976 Montreal Volleyball Women's tournament
[39]
 Bronze David Torosyan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1976 Montreal Boxing Men's Flyweight
[40]
 Silver Yurik Sarkisyan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1980 Moscow Weightlifting Men's 56 kg
[41]
 Gold Eduard Azaryan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1980 Moscow Gymnastics Men's artistic team all-around
[42]
 Silver Sirvard Emirzyan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1980 Moscow Diving Women's 10 metre platform
[43]
 Bronze Ashot Karagyan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1980 Moscow Fencing Men's team foil
[44]
 Gold Yurik Vardanyan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1980 Moscow Weightlifting Men's 82.5 kg
[45]
 Bronze David Ambartsumyan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1980 Moscow Diving Men's 10 metre platform
[46]
 Silver Ashot Karagyan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1980 Moscow Fencing Men's team épée
[44]
 Bronze Bernard Tchoullouyan France France 1980 Moscow Judo Men's Half Middleweight
[47]
 Bronze Sos Hayrapetyan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1980 Moscow Field hockey Men's tournament
[48]
 Gold Sanasar Oganisyan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1980 Moscow Wrestling Men's freestyle 90 kg
[49]
 Bronze Khoren Hovhannisyan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1980 Moscow Football Men's tournament
[50]
 Gold Oksen Mirzoyan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1988 Seoul Weightlifting Men's Bantamweight
[51]
 Silver Israel Militosyan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1988 Seoul Weightlifting Men's Lightweight
[52]
 Gold Levon Julfalakyan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1988 Seoul Wrestling Men's Greco-Roman 68 kg
[53]
 Silver Heorhiy Pohosov Soviet Union Soviet Union 1988 Seoul Fencing Men's team sabre
[54]
 Silver Stepan Sarkisyan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1988 Seoul Wrestling Men's freestyle 62 kg
[55]
 Bronze Manuela Maleeva[56] Bulgaria Bulgaria 1988 Seoul Tennis Women's Singles
[57]
 Silver Alfred Ter-Mkrtchyan International Olympic Committee Unified Team 1992 Barcelona Wrestling Men's Greco-Roman 52 kg
[58]
 Gold Mnatsakan Iskandaryan International Olympic Committee Unified Team 1992 Barcelona Wrestling Men's Greco-Roman 74 kg
[59]
 Gold Israel Militosyan International Olympic Committee Unified Team 1992 Barcelona Weightlifting Men's Lightweight–67.5 kg
[52]
 Gold Hrachya Petikyan International Olympic Committee Unified Team 1992 Barcelona Shooting Men's 50 metre rifle three positions
[60]
 Gold Elen Shakirova[61] International Olympic Committee Unified Team 1992 Barcelona Basketball Women's tournament
[62]
 Gold Heorhiy Pohosov International Olympic Committee Unified Team 1992 Barcelona Fencing Men's team sabre
[54]
 Gold Armen Nazaryan Armenia Armenia 1996 Atlanta Wrestling Men's Greco-Roman Flyweight
[63]
 Silver Armen Bagdasarov Uzbekistan Uzbekistan 1996 Atlanta Judo Men's Middleweight
[64]
 Bronze Karina Aznavourian[65] Russia Russia 1996 Atlanta Fencing Women's team épée
[66]
 Silver Armen Mkrtchyan Armenia Armenia 1996 Atlanta Wrestling Men's Freestyle Light Flyweight
[67]
 Gold Andre Agassi[68] United States United States 1996 Atlanta Tennis Men's singles
[69]
 Gold Karina Aznavourian[65] Russia Russia 2000 Sydney Fencing Women's team épée
[66]
 Silver Benjamin Varonian France France 2000 Sydney Gymnastics Men's horizontal bar
[70]
 Bronze Arsen Melikyan Armenia Armenia 2000 Sydney Weightlifting Men's Middleweight–77 kg
[71]
 Gold Varteres Samurgashev Russia Russia 2000 Sydney Wrestling Men's Greco-Roman 63 kg
[72]
 Gold Armen Nazaryan Bulgaria Bulgaria 2000 Sydney Wrestling Men's Greco-Roman flyweight–58 kg
[63]
 Gold Pavel Sukosyan[73] Russia Russia 2000 Sydney Handball Men's tournament
[74]
 Gold Karina Aznavourian[65] Russia Russia 2004 Athens Fencing Women's team épée
[66]
 Bronze Artiom Kiouregkian Greece Greece 2004 Athens Wrestling Men's Greco-Roman 55 kg
[75]
 Silver Ara Abrahamian Sweden Sweden 2004 Athens Wrestling Men's Greco-Roman 84 kg
[76]
 Silver Dimitra Asilian Greece Greece 2004 Athens Water polo Women's competition
[77]
 Bronze Mkhitar Manukyan Kazakhstan Kazakhstan 2004 Athens Wrestling Men's Greco-Roman 66 kg
[72]
 Bronze Armen Nazaryan Bulgaria Bulgaria 2004 Athens Wrestling Men's Greco-Roman 60 kg
[63]
 Bronze Varteres Samurgashev Russia Russia 2004 Athens Wrestling Men's Greco-Roman 74 kg
[72]
 Bronze Tigran G. Martirosyan Armenia Armenia 2008 Beijing Weightlifting Men's Middleweight (69 kg)
[78]
 Bronze Armen Vardanyan Ukraine Ukraine 2008 Beijing Wrestling Men's Greco-Roman 66 kg
[79]
 Bronze Gevorg Davtyan Armenia Armenia 2008 Beijing Weightlifting Men's Middleweight (77 kg)
[80]
 Bronze Tigran V. Martirosyan Armenia Armenia 2008 Beijing Weightlifting Men's Middleweight (85 kg)
[81]
 Gold Artur Ayvazyan Ukraine Ukraine 2008 Beijing Shooting Men's 50 metre rifle prone
[82]
 Gold Biurakn Hakhverdian Netherlands Netherlands 2008 Beijing Water polo Women's competition
[83]
 Bronze Hrachik Javakhyan Armenia Armenia 2008 Beijing Boxing Men's Lightweight
[84]
 Gold Arsen Galstyan Russia Russia 2012 London Judo Men's extra-lightweight–60 kg
[85]
 Bronze Hripsime Khurshudyan Armenia Armenia 2012 London Weightlifting Women's +75 kg
[86]
 Silver Arsen Julfalakyan Armenia Armenia 2012 London Wrestling Men's Greco-Roman–74 kg
[87]
 Bronze Artur Aleksanyan Armenia Armenia 2012 London Wrestling Men's Greco-Roman–96 kg
[88]
 Bronze David Ayrapetyan Russia Russia 2012 London Boxing Men's light flyweight–49 kg
[89]
 Gold Yana Egorian Russia Russia 2016 Rio Fencing Women's sabre
[90]
 Silver Seda Tutkhalyan Russia Russia 2016 Rio Gymnastics Women's artistic team all-around
[91]
 Bronze Kirill Grigoryan Russia Russia 2016 Rio Shooting Men's 50 metre rifle prone
[92]
 Gold Yana Egorian Russia Russia 2016 Rio Fencing Women's team sabre
[93]
 Silver Simon Martirosyan Armenia Armenia 2016 Rio Weightlifting Men's 105 kg
[94]
 Silver Mihran Harutyunyan Armenia Armenia 2016 Rio Wrestling Men's Greco-Roman 66 kg
[95]
 Gold Artur Aleksanyan Armenia Armenia 2016 Rio Wrestling Men's Greco-Roman 98 kg
[96]
 Silver Gor Minasyan Armenia Armenia 2016 Rio Weightlifting Men's +105 kg
[97]
 Bronze Artem Harutyunyan Germany Germany 2016 Rio Boxing Men's light welterweight 64 kg
[98]

Disqualified athletes[edit]

Armenian coaches of non-Armenian Olympic medalists

  • Adam Krikorian the head coach of the USA water polo women's team. At the 2016 Rio Games the USA water polo women's team wins gold medal.[1]

Winter Olympics[edit]

Medal Name Country Games Sport Event Ref
 Gold Grigory Mkrtychan Soviet Union Soviet Union 1956 Cortina d'Ampezzo Ice hockey Men's tournament
[101]
 Gold Vicki Movsessian United States United States 1998 Nagano Ice hockey Women's tournament
[102]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ At the time of the first modern Olympics in 1896, the Armenian homeland (i.e. the Armenian Highlands that has historically been called simply "Armenia" and held the overwhelming majority of the world's Armenian population until the Armenian Genocide of 1915), was divided between the Ottoman and Russian Empires. In 1918, the First Republic of Armenia was established in the parts of the Armenian homeland where Armenians still lived. It existed only two years and was annexed by the Red Army in late 1920. The Armenian SSR became part of the Soviet Union by the Treaty on the Creation of the USSR in December 1922. Armenia became independent following the 1991 independence referendum during the last months of the dissolution of the Soviet Union.
  2. ^ 385 is the most widely accepted date,[7][8][9][10][11] supported by a memorial plate at the museum in Olympia, Greece.[12] Other authors have indicated 369,[13][14][15][16] 365,[17] and 393[18] as the date of his victory. Some authors have erroneously stated that Varazdat was an Olympic champion in wrestling or pentathlon.[19]
Citations
  1. ^ a b "Armenian Sport Life in the pre-WWI Ottoman Empire". Armenian Genocide Museum-Institute. Archived from the original on 3 December 2013. Retrieved 16 December 2013.
  2. ^ a b "One More Olympic Moment Camden's Hal Prieste, 103, The Oldest Living Olympian, Will Go To Sydney To Return A Flag He Captured In 1920". The Philadelphia Inquirer. 9 September 2000. Archived from the original on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 20 August 2012.
  3. ^ "Armenia". Official website of the Olympic Movement. Archived from the original on August 31, 2012. Retrieved August 25, 2012.
  4. ^ Ispirian 2000, p. 191.
  5. ^ According to Faustus of Byzantium; see Hacikyan, Agop Jack; Basmajian, Gabriel; Franchuk, Edward S.; Ouzounian, Nourhan (2000). The Heritage of Armenian Literature: From the Oral Tradition to the Golden Age. 1. Detroit: Wayne State University Press. p. 184. ISBN 9780814328156.
  6. ^ Ispirian 2000, p. 194.
  7. ^ Gardiner, E. Norman (2002). Athletics in the ancient world. Mineola, New York: Dover Publications. ISBN 9780486424866. The last Olympic victor whose name we know is the Armenian Prince Varazdates, who won the boxing in the 291st Olympiad (A. D. 385).
  8. ^ Mandell, Richard D. (1987). The Nazi Olympics. Champaign: University of Illinois Press. p. 6. ISBN 9780252013256. Under the tolerant, assimilating Romans, the Olympics became polyglot and the last Olympic victor of whom we have record was an Armenian prince, Varaztad, who won a boxing match in A.D. 385.
  9. ^ Trypanis, Constantine Athanasius (1964). Grooves in the wind. Chilmark Press. p. 7. By a strange irony of fate the last recorded victor of the national (Olympic) games was Varazdates, a Ascarid from Armenia, who won the boxing in a.d. 385.
  10. ^ Baker, William Joseph (1988). Sports in the Western world (Rev. ed.). Urbana: University of Illinois Press. p. 40. ISBN 9780252060427. Fittingly, the last champion for whom there is evidence was not a Greek, but an Armenian boxer named Varaztad.
  11. ^ Lambros, Sp. P.; Polites, N. G. (1896). The Olympic Games, B.C.776-A.D.1896: Part First. New York: American Olympic Committee. p. 8. This explains how in the two hundred and ninety first Olympiad (385 B.C.) the victory was carried off by the Armenian pugilist, Varasdates, a descendant of the royal family of Arsacides, who became later the king of Armenia. This Varasdates was the last conqueror in the Olympic Games known to us.
  12. ^ Ispirian 2000, pp. 193-194: "Հարցի ճշգրտման վրա լույս է սփռում Հունաստանի Օլիմպիա ավանի օլիմպիական թանգարանում ցուցադրվող դարերի խոքից մեզ հասած հուշագիրը, ուր աղյուսաձև վերից վար նշված են օլիմպիական խաղերի թվերը, դրանց անցկացման տարեթվերը, օլիմպիական խաղերի չեմպիոնների անունները և նրանց երկրների անվանումները: Այդ հուշագիրը տեղեկացնում է որ հին հունական օլիմպիոնոկոսի կոչումը նվաճել է հայաստանցի Վարազդատը:"
  13. ^ Scanlon, Thomas F. (2002). Eros and Greek Athletics. New York: Oxford University Press. p. 357. ISBN 9780195348767. Varazdates, a Arsacid from Armenia who won in boxing in A.D. 369.
  14. ^ Guttmann, Allen (2004). Sports: The First Five Millennia. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press. p. 22. ISBN 9781558496101. The date of the last Olympic is as uncertain as the date of the first. Until quite recently, the last known victor was the Armenian prince Varazdat, who won the boxing competition in 369 A.D., but an inscription discovered at Olympia in 1994 gives the names of several athletes whose victories came as late as 385 A.D. If Theodosius I decreed an end to the Olympics in 394, as some scholars believe, then the last games took place in 393. (The evidence for this belief comes from an eleventh-century manuscript by Georgios Kedrenos.)
  15. ^ Wenn, Stephen R.; Schaus, Gerald P., eds. (2007). Onward to the Olympics : historical perspectives on the Olympic Games. Waterloo, Ontario: Wilfrid Laurier University Press. p. 5. ISBN 978-0-88920-505-5. Not only does the honour of being the last known Olympian no longer belong to Varazdat(es) of Armenia in AD 369, but it is significant for our understanding of the "end" of the Games that these latest Olympians came from Athens, not from distant parts if the ancient world.
  16. ^ Littlewood, A.R. (2010). "Olympia". In Wilson, Nigel (ed.). Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece. New York: Routledge. p. 515. ISBN 978-0-415-87396-3. Although the Roman conquest initially involved a vast diminution in the games' prestige, they now become open to at least some non-Greeks (the last known victor, of boxing in AD 369, was Varazdates, the crown prince of Armenia).
  17. ^ Perrottet, Tony (2004). The Naked Olympics: The True Story of the Ancient Games. New York: Random House. p. 190. ISBN 978-0-8129-6991-7. A.D. 365 - The last Olympic victor on record is the Armenian prince Varazdate, who won the boxing in the 291st Olympiad. A.D. 393 - Last official Olympic Games (the 293rd). The victors' names are lost.
  18. ^ Katvalian, Maksim (1985). "Վարազդան [Varazdat]". In Hambardzumyan, Viktor (ed.). Soviet Armenian Encyclopedia (in Armenian). Yerevan: Armenian Encyclopedia. pp. 305–306. Վարազդատը աղբյուրներում հայտնի է որպես բազմակողմանի զարգացած մարզիկ (ըստ Մովսես Խորենացու՝ կորովի նետաձիգ, ճարտար գազանամարտիկ, սուսերամարտիկ, ըմբշամարտիկ, բռնցքամարտիկ): Նրա անունը դրոշմվել է մարմարյա սալիկին՝ որպես վերջին օլիմպիադայի (393) չեմպիոնի:
  19. ^ Ispirian 2000, p. 193.
  20. ^ a b "Grant Shaginyan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 17 October 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  21. ^ a b c d "Шагинян Грант Амазаспович [Shaginyan Grant Amazaspovich]" (in Russian). Great Olympic Encyclopedia (2006). Archived from the original on 2014-08-05. Retrieved 2012-08-21.
  22. ^ "Rafael Chimishkyan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 24 October 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  23. ^ "Artem Teryan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 25 October 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  24. ^ "Vladimir Yengibaryan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 14 November 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  25. ^ a b c d "Albert Azaryan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 17 October 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  26. ^ "Nikita Simonyan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 14 November 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  27. ^ Американские ватерполисты мечтают выступать под флагом Армении
  28. ^ a b Armenian father; see "'Rome 1960': Politics at play in Olympic Games". Today. 7 July 2008. Archived from the original on 8 February 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012. His father, an Armenian-born discus thrower, and his mother, a Ukrainian volleyball player, had met at the Kiev State Institute of Physical Education, and both taught there while he was growing up.
  29. ^ a b "Igor Ter-Ovanesyan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 14 October 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  30. ^ "Armenak Alachachyan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 14 November 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  31. ^ a b "Norair Nurikyanpublisher=databaseOlympics.com". Archived from the original on 16 October 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  32. ^ "Eduard Mikaelyan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 14 November 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  33. ^ "Arkady Andriasyan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 14 November 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  34. ^ "Oganes Zanazanyan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 14 November 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  35. ^ "Vartan Militosyan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 24 October 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  36. ^ "Nelson Davidyan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 24 October 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  37. ^ "Suren Nalbandyan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 24 October 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  38. ^ "Anushavan Gassan-Dzhalalov". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 24 October 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  39. ^ "Nina Muradyan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 2 November 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  40. ^ "David Torosyan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 18 October 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  41. ^ "Yurik Sarkisyan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 24 October 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  42. ^ "Eduard Azaryan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 25 October 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  43. ^ "Sirvard Emirzyan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 2 November 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  44. ^ a b "Ashot Karagyan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 16 August 2011. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  45. ^ "Yurik Vardanyan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 24 October 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  46. ^ "David Ambartsumyan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 2 November 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  47. ^ "Bernard Tchoullouyan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 2 November 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  48. ^ "Sos Ayrapetyan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 18 October 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  49. ^ "Sanasar Oganisyan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 24 October 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  50. ^ "Khoren Oganesyan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 14 November 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  51. ^ "Oksen Mirzoyan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 24 October 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  52. ^ a b "Alfred Ter-Mkrtchyan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 24 October 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  53. ^ "Levon Dzhulfalakyan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 24 October 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  54. ^ a b "Georgy Pogosov". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 10 March 2011. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  55. ^ "Stepan Sarkisyan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 24 October 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  56. ^ Armenian mother; see "Manuela Maleeva–Female tennis player". events.bg. Archived from the original on 24 December 2013. Retrieved 20 August 2012. The mother, who came from a prominent Armenian family, which found refuge in Bulgaria after the 1896 Armenian massacres in the Ottoman Empire, was the best Bulgarian tennis player in the 1960s.
  57. ^ "Manuela Maleeva". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 20 November 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  58. ^ "Alfred Ter-Mkrtchyan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 2 November 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  59. ^ "Mnatsakan Iskandaryan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 2 November 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  60. ^ "Grachiya Petikyan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 23 October 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  61. ^ Armenian father; see "Во что играет "Спартак", пока "Балтийская звезда" играет в баскетбол [This is what "Spartak" is playing, while "Baltic Star" is playing basketball]". Nevsky Sport (in Russian). 23 February 2004. Archived from the original on 1 June 2012. Retrieved 20 August 2012. Мама у меня русская, папа действительно армянин, я даже в прошлом году участвовала в Ереване в Панармянских играх, мне факел на торжественном открытии доверили.
  62. ^ "Elen Bunatyants". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 14 November 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  63. ^ a b c "Armen Nazaryan". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 24 October 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  64. ^ "Armen Bagdasarov". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 2 November 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  65. ^ a b c Armenian father; see "Карина Азнавурян: "Я поехала бы в Баку хоть сейчас"" (in Russian). Memorial. 16 February 2008. Archived from the original on 21 September 2013. Retrieved 17 December 2013. Мой отец армянин, мать азербайджанка.
  66. ^ a b c "Karina Aznavourian". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 26 October 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  67. ^ "Armen Mkertchian". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 4 March 2007. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  68. ^ Armenian paternal grandfather; see "Bio:Andre Agassi". Persian Mirror. Archived from the original on 30 January 2006. Retrieved 27 January 2011.
  69. ^ "Andre Agassi". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 13 November 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  70. ^ "Benjamin Varonian". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on 14 November 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
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