List of United States major party presidential tickets

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In the United States, political parties nominate one candidate each for President of the United States and for Vice President of the United States. These candidates attempt to win presidential elections by taking a majority of the electoral vote. The two candidates together are known as a ticket. Note that many states did not hold popular votes for the presidential election prior to the advent of Jacksonian Democracy in the 1820s. Also note that prior to the ratification of the 12th Amendment in 1804, electors cast two votes for president rather than one vote for president and one vote for vice president. Under the pre-12th Amendment Constitution, the candidate with the most votes became president and the candidate with the second most votes became vice president; hence, all candidates were technically running against each other.[1] The listed ages are as of election day; for races prior to 1845, December 1st is considered election day for the purposes of the list.

Major tickets[edit]

Included below are all of the major party (Democratic-Republican, Federalist, Democratic, National Republican, Whig, and Republican) tickets, along with the nonpartisan candidacy of George Washington. Also included are independent and third party tickets that won at least ten percent of the popular or electoral vote. An asterisk (*) denotes elections held before the ratification of the 12th Amendment.[2] An asterisk or caret (^) denotes elections held before 1832; before 1832, many states did not hold a popular vote for president.[3]

Presidential nominee Vice Presidential nominee Results[4]
Year T[5] P Position Name S B A Position Name S B A PV% EV% R
 
2016 O R Businessman Donald Trump NY 1946 70 Governor Mike Pence IN 1959 57 46.1 56.5 1
2016 O D Fmr. Sec. of State Hillary Clinton NY 1947 69 Senator Tim Kaine VA 1958 58 48.2 42.2 2
2012 I D President Barack Obama IL 1961 51 Vice President Joe Biden DE 1942 69 51 61.7 1
2012 C R Fmr. Governor Mitt Romney MA 1947 65 Congressman Paul Ryan WI 1970 42 47.2 38.3 2
2008 O D Senator Barack Obama IL 1961 47 Senator Joe Biden DE 1942 65 52.9 67.8 1
2008 O R Senator John McCain AZ 1936 72 Governor Sarah Palin AK 1964 44 45.6 32.2 2
2004 I R President George W. Bush TX 1946 58 Vice President Dick Cheney WY 1941 63 50.7 53.2 1
2004 C D Senator John Kerry MA 1943 60 Senator John Edwards NC 1953 51 48.3 46.7 2
2000 O R Governor George W. Bush TX 1946 54 Fmr. Sec. of Defense Dick Cheney WY 1941 59 47.9 50.4 1
2000 O D Vice President Al Gore TN 1948 52 Senator Joe Lieberman CT 1942 58 48.4 49.4 2
1996 I D President Bill Clinton AR 1946 50 Vice President Al Gore TN 1948 48 49.2 70.4 1
1996 C R Senator Bob Dole KS 1923 73 Fmr. Sec. of HUD Jack Kemp NY 1935 61 40.7 29.6 2
1992 C D Governor Bill Clinton AR 1946 46 Senator Al Gore TN 1948 44 43 68.8 1
1992 I R President George H. W. Bush TX 1924 68 Vice President Dan Quayle IN 1947 45 37.5 31.2 2
1992 T I Businessman Ross Perot TX 1930 62 Admiral James Stockdale CA 1923 68 18.9 0 3
1988 O R Vice President George H. W. Bush TX 1924 64 Senator Dan Quayle IN 1947 41 53.4 79.2 1
1988 O D Governor Michael Dukakis MA 1933 55 Senator Lloyd Bentsen TX 1921 67 45.7 20.1 2
1984 I R President Ronald Reagan CA 1911 73 Vice President George H. W. Bush TX 1924 60 58.8 97.6 1
1984 C D Fmr. Vice President Walter Mondale MN 1928 56 Congresswoman Geraldine Ferraro NY 1935 49 40.6 2.4 2
1980 C R Fmr. Governor Ronald Reagan CA 1911 69 Fmr. Ambassador George H. W. Bush TX 1924 56 50.8 90.9 1
1980 I D President Jimmy Carter GA 1924 56 Vice President Walter Mondale MN 1928 52 41 9.1 2
1976 C D Fmr. Governor Jimmy Carter GA 1924 52 Senator Walter Mondale MN 1928 48 50.1 53.9 1
1976 I R President Gerald Ford MI 1913 63 Senator Bob Dole KS 1923 53 48 44.6 2
1972 I R President Richard Nixon[6] CA 1913 59 Vice President Spiro Agnew[7] MD 1918 53 60.6 96.7 1
1972 C D Senator George McGovern SD 1922 50 Fmr. Ambassador Sargent Shriver[8] MD 1915 56 37.5 3.2 2
1968 O R Fmr. Vice President Richard Nixon CA 1913 55 Governor Spiro Agnew MD 1918 49 43.4 55.9 1
1968 O D Vice President Hubert Humphrey MN 1911 57 Senator Edmund Muskie ME 1914 54 42.7 35.5 2
1968 T AI Fmr. Governor George Wallace AL 1919 49 General Curtis LeMay CA 1906 61 13.5 8.6 3
1964 I D President Lyndon B. Johnson TX 1908 56 Senator Hubert Humphrey MN 1911 53 61.1 90.3 1
1964 C R Senator Barry Goldwater AZ 1909 55 Congressman William E. Miller NY 1914 50 38.5 9.7 2
1960 O D Senator John F. Kennedy[9] MA 1917 43 Senator Lyndon B. Johnson TX 1908 52 49.7 56.4 1
1960 O R Vice President Richard Nixon CA 1913 47 Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. MA 1902 58 49.6 40.8 2
1956 I R President Dwight D. Eisenhower NY 1890 66 Vice President Richard Nixon CA 1913 43 57.4 86.1 1
1956 C D Fmr. Governor Adlai Stevenson II IL 1900 56 Senator Estes Kefauver TN 1903 53 42 13.7 2
1952 O R General Dwight D. Eisenhower NY 1890 62 Senator Richard Nixon CA 1913 39 55.2 83.2 1
1952 O D Governor Adlai Stevenson II IL 1900 52 Senator John Sparkman AL 1899 52 44.2 16.8 2
1948 I D President Harry S. Truman MO 1884 64 Senator Alben W. Barkley KY 1877 70 49.6 57.1 1
1948 C R Governor Thomas E. Dewey NY 1902 46 Governor Earl Warren CA 1891 57 45.1 35.6 2
1944 I D President Franklin D. Roosevelt[10] NY 1882 62 Senator Harry S. Truman MO 1884 60 53.4 81.4 1
1944 C R Governor Thomas E. Dewey NY 1902 42 Governor John W. Bricker OH 1893 51 45.3 18.6 2
1940 I D President Franklin D. Roosevelt NY 1882 58 Sec. of Agriculture Henry A. Wallace IA 1888 52 54.7 84.6 1
1940 C R Businessman Wendell Willkie NY 1892 48 Senator Charles L. McNary OR 1874 66 44.8 15.4 2
1936 I D President Franklin D. Roosevelt NY 1882 54 Vice President John Nance Garner TX 1868 67 60.8 98.5 1
1936 C R Governor Alf Landon KS 1887 49 Publisher Frank Knox IL 1874 62 36.5 1.5 2
1932 C D Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt NY 1882 50 Speaker John Nance Garner TX 1868 63 57.4 88.9 1
1932 I R President Herbert Hoover CA 1874 58 Vice President Charles Curtis KS 1860 72 39.7 11.1 2
1928 O R Sec. of Commerce Herbert Hoover CA 1874 54 Senator Charles Curtis KS 1860 68 58.2 83.6 1
1928 O D Governor Al Smith NY 1873 54 Senator Joseph Taylor Robinson AR 1872 56 40.8 16.4 2
1924 I R President Calvin Coolidge MA 1872 52 Fmr. Budget Director Charles G. Dawes IL 1865 59 54 71.9 1
1924 C D Fmr. Ambassador John W. Davis WV 1873 51 Governor Charles W. Bryan NE 1867 57 28.8 25.6 2
1924 T P Senator Robert M. La Follette Sr. WI 1855 69 Senator Burton K. Wheeler MT 1882 42 16.6 2.4 3
1920 O R Senator Warren G. Harding[11] OH 1865 55 Governor Calvin Coolidge MA 1872 48 60.3 76.1 1
1920 O D Governor James M. Cox OH 1870 50 Ast. Sec. of Navy Franklin D. Roosevelt NY 1882 38 34.2 23.9 2
1916 I D President Woodrow Wilson NJ 1856 59 Vice President Thomas R. Marshall IN 1854 62 49.2 52.2 1
1916 C R Associate Justice Charles Evans Hughes NY 1862 54 Fmr. Vice President Charles W. Fairbanks IN 1852 64 46.1 47.8 2
1912 C D Governor Woodrow Wilson NJ 1856 55 Governor Thomas R. Marshall IN 1854 58 41.8 81.9 1
1912 T P Fmr. President Theodore Roosevelt NY 1858 54 Governor Hiram Johnson CA 1866 46 27.4 16.6 2
1912 I R President William Howard Taft OH 1857 55 Vice President James S. Sherman[12] NY 1855 57 23.2 1.5 3
1908 O R Sec. of War William Howard Taft OH 1857 51 Congressman James S. Sherman NY 1855 53 51.5 66.5 1
1908 O D Fmr. Congressman William Jennings Bryan NE 1860 48 Fmr. state senator John W. Kern IN 1849 58 43 33.5 2
1904 I R President Theodore Roosevelt NY 1858 46 Senator Charles W. Fairbanks IN 1852 52 56.4 70.6 1
1904 C D State Judge Alton B. Parker NY 1852 52 Fmr. Senator Henry G. Davis WV 1823 80 37.6 29.4 2
1900 I R President William McKinley[13] OH 1843 57 Governor Theodore Roosevelt NY 1858 42 51.6 65.3 1
1900 C D Fmr. Congressman William Jennings Bryan NE 1860 40 Fmr. Vice President Adlai Stevenson I IL 1835 65 45.5 34.7 2
1896 O R Governor William McKinley OH 1843 53 Fmr. state senator Garret Hobart NJ 1844 52 51 60.1 1
1896 O D Fmr. Congressman William Jennings Bryan[14] NE 1860 36 Businessman Arthur Sewall ME 1835 60 46.7 39.4 2
1892 C D Fmr. President Grover Cleveland NY 1837 55 Fmr. Congressman Adlai Stevenson I IL 1835 57 46 62.4 1
1892 I R President Benjamin Harrison IN 1833 59 Fmr. Ambassador Whitelaw Reid NY 1837 55 43 32.7 2
1888 C R Fmr. Senator Benjamin Harrison IN 1833 55 Fmr. Ambassador Levi P. Morton NY 1824 64 47.8 58.1 1
1888 I D President Grover Cleveland NY 1837 51 Fmr. Senator Allen G. Thurman OH 1813 74 48.6 41.9 2
1884 O D Governor Grover Cleveland NY 1837 47 Fmr. Governor Thomas A. Hendricks IN 1819 65 48.9 54.6 1
1884 O R Fmr. Speaker James G. Blaine ME 1830 54 Senator John A. Logan IL 1826 58 48.3 45.4 2
1880 O R Congressman James A. Garfield[15] OH 1831 49 Fmr. Port Collector Chester A. Arthur NY 1829 51 48.3 58 1
1880 O D General Winfield S. Hancock PA 1824 55 Fmr. Congressman William Hayden English IN 1822 58 48.2 42 2
1876 O R Governor Rutherford B. Hayes OH 1822 54 Congressman William A. Wheeler NY 1819 57 47.9 50.1 1
1876 O D Governor Samuel Tilden NY 1814 62 Governor Thomas A. Hendricks IN 1819 57 50.9 49.9 2
1872 I R President Ulysses S. Grant IL 1822 50 Senator Henry Wilson MA 1812 60 55.6 81.3 1
1872 C LR/D Publisher Horace Greeley[16] NY 1811 61 Governor Benjamin Gratz Brown MO 1826 46 43.8 18.8 2
1868 O R General Ulysses S. Grant IL 1822 46 Speaker Schuyler Colfax IN 1823 45 52.7 72.8 1
1868 O D Fmr. Governor Horatio Seymour NY 1810 58 Fmr. Congressman Francis Preston Blair Jr. MO 1821 47 47.3 27.2 2
1864 I NU President Abraham Lincoln[17] IL 1809 55 Governor Andrew Johnson[18] TN 1808 55 55 91 1
1864 C D General George McClellan NJ 1826 37 Congressman George Pendleton OH 1825 39 45 9 2
1860 O R Fmr. Congressman Abraham Lincoln IL 1809 51 Senator Hannibal Hamlin ME 1809 51 39.7 59.4 1
1860 O SD Vice President John Breckinridge[19] KY 1821 39 Senator Joseph Lane OR 1801 58 18.2 23.8 2
1860 T CU Fmr. Senator John Bell TN 1796 64 Fmr. Governor Edward Everett MA 1794 66 12.6 12.9 3
1860 O ND Senator Stephen Douglas[19] IL 1813 47 Fmr. Governor Herschel Johnson GA 1812 48 29.5 4 4
1856 O D Fmr. Sec. of State James Buchanan PA 1791 65 Fmr. Congressman John Breckinridge KY 1821 35 45.3 58.8 1
1856 O R Colonel[20] John Frémont[21] CA 1813 43 Fmr. Senator William Dayton NJ 1807 49 33.1 38.5 2
1856 O A/W Fmr. President Millard Fillmore[21] NY 1800 56 Fmr. Ambassador Andrew Donelson TN 1799 57 21.5 2.7 3
1852 O D Fmr. Senator Franklin Pierce NH 1804 48 Senator William King AL 1786 66 50.8 85.8 1
1852 O W General Winfield Scott NJ 1786 66 Sec. of the Navy William Graham NC 1804 48 43.9 14.2 2
1848 O W General Zachary Taylor[22] LA 1784 63 Fmr. Congressman Millard Fillmore NY 1800 48 47.3 56.2 1
1848 O D Senator Lewis Cass MI 1782 66 General William Butler KY 1791 57 42.5 43.8 2
1848 T FS Fmr. President Martin Van Buren NY 1782 65 Fmr. state senator Charles Adams MA 1807 41 10.1 0 3
1844 O D Fmr. Speaker James K. Polk TN 1795 49 Fmr. Senator George Dallas PA 1792 52 49.5 61.8 1
1844 O W Fmr. Speaker Henry Clay KY 1777 67 Fmr. Senator Theodore Frelinghuysen NJ 1787 57 48.1 38.2 2
1840 C W Fmr. Senator William Henry Harrison[23] OH 1773 67 Fmr. Senator John Tyler[23] VA 1790 50 52.9 79.6 1
1840 I D President Martin Van Buren NY 1782 57 - None[24] - - - 46.8 20.4 2
1836 O D Vice President Martin Van Buren NY 1782 53 Fmr. Senator Richard Johnson[25] KY 1780 56 50.8 57.8 1
1836 O W Fmr. Senator William Henry Harrison[26] OH 1773 63 Congressman Francis Granger[27] NY 1792 44 36.6 24.8 2
1832 I D President Andrew Jackson TN 1767 65 Fmr. Sec. of State Martin Van Buren NY 1782 49 54.2 76.6 1
1832 C NR Senator Henry Clay KY 1777 55 Fmr. Congressman John Sergeant PA 1779 52 37.4 17.1 2
1828^ C D General Andrew Jackson TN 1767 61 Vice President John C. Calhoun SC 1782 46 56 68.2 1
1828^ I NR President John Quincy Adams MA 1767 61 Sec. of Treasury Richard Rush PA 1780 48 43.6 31.8 2
1824^ O DR Sec. of State John Quincy Adams[28] MA 1767 57 Sec. of War John C. Calhoun[29] SC 1782 42 30.9 32.2 2*
1824^ O DR General Andrew Jackson[28] TN 1767 57 Sec. of War John C. Calhoun[29] SC 1782 42 41.4 37.9 1
1824^ O DR Sec. of Treasury William Crawford[28] GA 1772 52 Senator Nathaniel Macon[29] NC 1757 66 11.2 15.7 3
1824^ O DR Speaker Henry Clay[28] KY 1777 47 Fmr. Senator Nathan Sanford[29] NY 1777 47 13 14.2 4
1820^ I DR President James Monroe[30] VA 1758 62 Vice President Daniel Tompkins NY 1774 46 80.6 99.6 1
1816^ O DR Sec. of State James Monroe VA 1758 58 Governor Daniel Tompkins NY 1774 42 68.2 84.3 1
1816^ O F Senator Rufus King NY 1755 61 Fmr. Senator John Howard MD 1752 64 30.9 15.7 2
1812^ I DR President James Madison VA 1751 61 Fmr. Governor Elbridge Gerry MA 1744 68 50.4 59 1
1812^ C DR/F Mayor DeWitt Clinton[31] NY 1769 43 State AG Jared Ingersoll[31] PA 1749 63 47.6 41 2
1808^ O DR Sec. of State James Madison VA 1751 57 Vice President George Clinton NY 1739 69 64.7 69.3 1
1808^ O F Fmr. Ambassador Charles Pinckney SC 1746 62 Fmr. Ambassador Rufus King NY 1755 53 32.4 26.7 2
1804^ I DR President Thomas Jefferson VA 1743 61 Governor George Clinton NY 1739 65 72.8 92 1
1804^ C F Fmr. Ambassador Charles Pinckney SC 1746 58 Fmr. Ambassador Rufus King NY 1755 49 27.2 8 2
1800* C DR Vice President Thomas Jefferson[32] VA 1743 57 Fmr. Senator Aaron Burr[32] NY 1756 44 61.4 52.9 1
1800* I F President John Adams MA 1735 65 Fmr. Ambassador Charles Pinckney SC 1746 54 38.6 47.1 2
1796* O F Vice President John Adams MA 1735 61 Fmr. Ambassador Thomas Pinckney[33] SC 1750 46 53.4 51.4 1
1796* O DR Fmr. Sec. of State Thomas Jefferson[33] VA 1743 53 Senator Aaron Burr[34] NY 1756 40 46.6 49.3 2
1792* I N President George Washington[35] VA 1732 60 Vice President John Adams[36] MA 1735 57 100 100 1
1789* O N General George Washington[35] VA 1732 56 Fmr. Ambassador John Adams[36] MA 1735 53 100 100 1

Other significant tickets[edit]

The following post-1800 tickets won less than 10% of the popular vote and less than 10% of the electoral vote, but won more than 1% of the popular vote or at least one electoral vote.[37] A caret (^) denotes elections held before 1832; before 1832, many states did not hold a popular vote for president.[3]

Presidential candidate Vice Presidential candidate Results[4]
Year P Position Name S B A Position Name S B A PV% EV% R
2016 L Fmr. Governor Gary Johnson NM 1953 63 Fmr. Governor William Weld MA 1945 71 3.3 0 3
2016 G Physician Jill Stein MA 1950 66 Activist Ajamu Baraka IL 1953 63 1.1 0 4
2000 G Attorney Ralph Nader CT 1934 66 Economist Winona LaDuke MN 1959 41 2.7 0 3
1996 Ref Businessman Ross Perot TX 1930 66 Economist Pat Choate DC 1941 55 8.4 0 3
1980 I Congressman John B. Anderson IL 1922 58 Fmr. Governor Patrick Lucey WI 1918 62 6.6 0 3
1980 L Attorney Ed Clark CA 1930 50 Businessman David Koch KS 1940 40 1.1 0 4
1972 AI Congressman John G. Schmitz CA 1930 42 Publisher Thomas J. Anderson TN 1910 61 1.4 0 3
1960 D Senator Harry F. Byrd[38] VA 1887 73 Governor Strom Thurmond[38] SC 1902 57 0 2.8 3
1948 SR Governor Strom Thurmond SC 1902 45 Governor Fielding L. Wright MS 1895 53 2.4 7.3 3
1948 P Fmr. Vice President Henry A. Wallace IA 1888 60 Senator Glen H. Taylor ID 1904 44 2.4 0 4
1936 U Congressman William Lemke ND 1878 57 Attorney Thomas C. O'Brien MA 1887 48 1.9 0 3
1932 S Minister Norman Thomas NY 1884 47 Fmr. state rep. James H. Maurer PA 1864 68 2.2 0 3
1920 S Fmr. state senator Eugene V. Debs IN 1855 65 Attorney Seymour Stedman IL 1871 49 3.4 0 3
1916 S Editor Allan L. Benson NY 1871 45 Writer George Kirkpatrick NJ 1867 49 3.2 0 3
1916 Ph Fmr. Governor Frank Hanly IN 1863 53 Minister Ira Landrith TN 1865 55 1.2 0 4
1912 S Fmr. state senator Eugene V. Debs IN 1855 57 Mayor Emil Seidel WI 1864 47 6 0 4
1912 Ph Attorney Eugene W. Chafin IN 1852 60 Minister Aaron S. Watkins KY 1863 49 1.4 0 5
1908 S Fmr. state senator Eugene V. Debs IN 1855 53 Tradesman Ben Hanford NY 1861 47 2.8 0 3
1908 Ph Attorney Eugene W. Chafin IN 1852 56 Minister Aaron S. Watkins KY 1863 45 1.7 0 4
1904 S Fmr. state senator Eugene V. Debs IN 1855 48 Tradesman Ben Hanford NY 1861 43 3 0 3
1904 Ph Minister Silas C. Swallow PA 1839 65 Businessman George W. Carroll TX 1855 49 1.9 0 4
1900 Ph Attorney John G. Woolley IL 1850 50 Businessman Henry B. Metcalf RI 1829 71 1.5 0 3
1892 Po Fmr. Congressman James B. Weaver IA 1833 59 Fmr. state AG James G. Field VA 1826 66 8.5 5 3
1892 Ph Fmr. Congressman John Bidwell CA 1819 73 Minister James B. Cranfill[39] TX 1858 34 2.2 0 4
1888 Ph Businessman Clinton B. Fisk NY 1828 59 Scholar John A. Brooks MO 1836 51 2.2 0 3
1888 LU State senator Alson Streeter IL 1823 65 Attorney Charles Cunningham AR 1823 65 1.3 0 4
1884 GB Fmr. Governor Benjamin F. Butler MA 1818 65 State senator Absolom M. West MS 1817 67 1.7 0 3
1884 Ph Fmr. Governor John St. John KS 1833 51 Attorney William Daniel MD 1826 58 1.5 0 4
1880 GB Congressman James B. Weaver IA 1833 47 Businessman Barzillai Chambers TX 1817 62 3.4 0 3
1852 FS Senator John P. Hale NH 1806 46 Fmr. Congressman George W. Julian IN 1817 35 4.9 0 3
1844 Li Attorney James G. Birney MI 1792 52 Fmr. Senator Thomas Morris OH 1776 68 2.3 0 3
1836 W Senator Hugh Lawson White[26] TN 1773 63 Fmr. Senator John Tyler[27] VA 1790 46 9.7 8.8 3
1836 W Senator Daniel Webster[26] MA 1782 54 Congressman Francis Granger[27] NY 1792 44 2.7 4.8 4
1836 W Senator Willie Mangum[26] NC 1792 44 Fmr. Senator John Tyler[27] VA 1790 46 0[40] 3.7 5
1832 N Governor John Floyd[41] VA 1783 49 Economist Henry Lee MA 1782 50 0 3.8 3
1832 AM Fmr. Attorney General William Wirt VA 1772 60 Fmr. state AG Amos Ellmaker PA 1787 45 7.8 2.4 4
1820^ DR Governor DeWitt Clinton[42] NY 1769 51 - None - - - 1.75 0 3
1812^ F Fmr. Ambassador Rufus King[43] NY 1755 57 Fmr. Governor William Davie NC 1756 56 2 0 3
1808^ DR Vice President George Clinton[44] NY 1739 69 Fmr. Ambassador James Monroe[44] VA 1758 50 0 3.4 3
1808^ DR Ambassador James Monroe[45] VA 1758 50 - None - - - 2.5 0 4

See also[edit]

References and notes[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ For a full list of candidates that received electoral votes, see List of people who received an electoral vote in the United States Electoral College.
  2. ^ In elections held before the ratification of the 12th Amendment, each elector cast two electoral votes for president. For these elections, the party's candidate that received the most electoral votes is assigned the position of presidential nominee for the purposes of the table, while the party's candidate that won the second most electoral votes is assigned the position of vice presidential nominee. For these elections, the "electoral vote percentage" column reflects the percentage of electors won by the presidential candidate, rather than the percentage of electoral votes won.
  3. ^ a b Kolodny, Robin (1996). "The Several Elections of 1824". Congress & the Presidency. Washington, D.C.: American University. 23 (2).  and Moore, John L., ed. (1985). Congressional Quarterly's Guide to U.S. Elections (2nd ed.). Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly, Inc. p. 266.  The South Carolina legislature continued to choose presidential electors until 1868, but, with only a small number of exceptions, all other states held popular votes after the 1828 election. Between 1848 and 1872, four newly-admitted (or re-admitted) states used legislative choice for a single election.
  4. ^ a b The results reflect the presidential vote. The last column (marked "R") reflects the presidential nominee's ranking in number of electoral votes, with the popular vote breaking ties.
  5. ^ I=incumbent president, C=challenger to an incumbent, O=open seat, T=Post-1800 third party or independent ticket
  6. ^ Nixon resigned in 1974 and was succeeded by former Congressman Gerald Ford of Michigan.
  7. ^ Agnew resigned in 1973 and was succeeded by former Congressman Gerald Ford of Michigan. When President Nixon resigned in 1974, Ford ascended to the presidency. Ford appointed former Governor Nelson Rockefeller of New York as his successor as vice president.
  8. ^ Shriver replaced Missouri Senator Thomas Eagleton on the ticket after Eagleton stepped down.
  9. ^ Kennedy was assassinated 1963 and was succeeded by Johnson.
  10. ^ Roosevelt died in 1945 and was succeeded by Truman.
  11. ^ Harding died in 1923 and was succeeded by Coolidge.
  12. ^ Sherman died before the meeting of the electoral college, and Nicholas M. Butler received the electoral votes that would have gone to Sherman.
  13. ^ McKinley was assassinated in 1901 and was succeeded by Roosevelt.
  14. ^ Bryan was also the Populist nominee with Thomas E. Watson as his running mate.
  15. ^ Garfield was assassinated in 1881 and was succeeded by Arthur.
  16. ^ Greeley was nominated by the Liberal Republicans and subsequently nominated by the Democrats. Greeley died shortly after the election, but before the electoral votes were cast. Most of the electoral votes that would have been cast for Greeley instead went to former Indiana Senator Thomas A. Hendricks or Benjamin Gratz Brown. Greeley's EV% reflects what he would have won had he lived and if there were no faithless electors.
  17. ^ Lincoln ran on the National Union ticket which consisted of Republicans, War Democrats, and other Unionists. Lincoln was assassinated in 1865 and was succeeded by Johnson.
  18. ^ Andrew Johnson had been a Democrat, but ran with Lincoln as part of the National Union ticket which consisted of Republicans, War Democrats, and other Unionists. Johnson became president after Lincoln's assassination in 1865 and clashed with Republicans. Johnson attempted to establish his own party, then sought the Democratic nomination, but was defeated by Horatio Seymour.
  19. ^ a b The Democratic Party held three national conventions in 1860. The first produced a deadlock, and the second nominated Douglas. A group of Southern Democrats bolted from the second convention and held a third convention, which nominated Breckinridge. The Breckinridge-Lane ticket is often labelled as the "Southern Democratic" ticket while the Douglas-Johnson ticket is sometimes labelled as the "Northern Democratic" ticket.
  20. ^ Gienapp, William E. (1987). The Origins of the Republican Party, 1852-1856. Oxford University Press. p. 323. Retrieved 10 October 2015. 
  21. ^ a b With the collapse of the Whig Party in the early 1850s, the 1856 election lacked a clear second party in opposition to the Democrats. Many Whigs joined the Republican Party or the American Party, and the latter two parties competed to become the principal opposition party. Former Whig President Fillmore won the nomination of the American Party, as well as the nomination of the remaining Whigs. As slavery continued to divide the nation in the late 1850s, the Republican Party became the dominant party in the North and the American Party dissolved.
  22. ^ Taylor died in 1850 and was succeeded by Fillmore.
  23. ^ a b Harrison died in office in 1841 and was succeeded by Tyler. Tyler was expelled from the Whig Party shortly after taking office and spent most of his tenure as an independent. Tyler's name is italicized because he appears twice in the same table for the same election.
  24. ^ Van Buren campaigned without a running mate as the party refused to re-nominate Vice President Richard Mentor Johnson but was unable to agree on an alternative. A majority of Van Buren's electors ultimately cast their vice presidential vote for Johnson.
  25. ^ Though Van Buren won a majority of electoral votes, Johnson only won a plurality as Virginia's electors voted for Van Buren for president and William Smith for vice president. Under the terms of the 12th Amendment, the Senate held a contingent election to elect the vice president, which Johnson won.
  26. ^ a b c d The Whigs ran four candidates in 1836 in hopes of sending the election to the House under the terms of the 12th Amendment. The plan failed as Van Buren won a majority of the Electoral College.
  27. ^ a b c d Whigs electors spread their votes among two vice presidential candidates in 1836. Francis Granger won most of the electoral votes cast by electors that voted for Harrison and Webster, while John Tyler won the electoral votes of White and Mangum supporters.
  28. ^ a b c d In 1824, the Democratic-Republicans failed to agree on one candidate, and four Democratic-Republican candidates received electoral votes. No candidate won a majority of the electoral vote, so the House of Representatives conducted a contingent election under the terms of the 12th Amendment. The House chose between the three candidates with the most electoral votes, which were Jackson, Adams, and Crawford. Adams won the contingent election.
  29. ^ a b c d In 1824, several vice presidential candidates received electoral votes, but Calhoun won a majority of the electoral vote for vice president. Calhoun is italicized because he appears twice in the table for the same election.
  30. ^ Monroe was essentially unopposed in the election. A faithless elector, William Plumer, cast an electoral vote for Secretary of State John Quincy Adams, while unpledged Federalist electors and the independent candidacy of DeWitt Clinton won a small portion of the popular vote.
  31. ^ a b Clinton was supported by a mix of anti-Madison Democratic-Republicans and Federalists. Clinton himself remained in the Democratic-Republican Party. His running mate, Ingersoll, was a Federalist.
  32. ^ a b Jefferson tied his running mate, Burr, in electoral votes. As Jefferson and Burr tied, the House held a contingent election between Jefferson and Burr. Jefferson won the contingent election to become president, while Burr became vice president.
  33. ^ a b Though Adams won election as president, Pinckney did not win election as vice president. Instead, Thomas Jefferson won election as vice president since he had the second most electoral votes. In addition to Pinckney and Adams, five other Federalists received electoral votes.
  34. ^ Burr received less than half the number of electoral votes won by Jefferson. Three other Democratic-Republicans won electoral votes.
  35. ^ a b Washington won election before the formation of formal political parties, and refused to join either the Federalists or the Democratic-Republicans as they formed during his presidency.
  36. ^ a b Though Washington was essentially unopposed, Adams faced competition for the second most electoral votes in both 1789 and 1792. In 1789, Adams's strongest competition came from John Jay of New York, while in 1792 Adams's strongest opposition came from George Clinton of New York.
  37. ^ Discounting votes from faithless electors
  38. ^ a b Byrd and Thurmond did not seek national office in 1960, but received the votes of unpledged electors from Mississippi and Alabama.
  39. ^ Cranfill was allowed to appear on state ballots despite the fact that he was constitutionally ineligible to be vice president due to his age. Winger, Richard (2 April 2012). "How the 1892 Presidential Election Sheds Light on the Question of Printing Underage Presidential and Vice-Presidential Candidates' Names on Ballots". Ballot Access News. Retrieved 7 September 2017. 
  40. ^ Mangum won South Carolina, where the state legislature chose presidential electors. He did not appear on any other state's ballot.
  41. ^ Floyd did not actively campaign for the presidential nomination. He won the votes of South Carolina, where the legislature appointed electors.
  42. ^ Clinton did not actively run, but received 1,893 votes.
  43. ^ Most Federalists supported Clinton in 1812, but King received votes as a "straight Federalist."
  44. ^ a b The New York legislature split its presidential electoral votes between James Madison and George Clinton, and its vice presidential electoral votes between Monroe and Madison.
  45. ^ A group of tertium quids supported Monroe, but Monroe did not contest the election.

Sources[edit]